Public Speaking Quotes

Quotes tagged as "public-speaking" (showing 1-30 of 226)
Winston S. Churchill
“A good speech should be like a woman's skirt; long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.”
Winston S. Churchill

Winston S. Churchill
“If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time - a tremendous whack.”
Winston S. Churchill

Paul Arden
“Too many people spend too much time trying to perfect something before they actually do it. Instead of waiting for perfection, run with what you go, and fix it along the way…”
Paul Arden

Susan Cain
“Naked lions are just as dangerous as elegantly dressed ones”
Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

Ashley Ormon
“Honestly, if everyone likes what you say something is wrong with your message.”
Ashley Ormon

Dale Carnegie
“Students of public speaking continually ask, "How can I overcome
self-consciousness and the fear that paralyzes me before an
audience?"
Did you ever notice in looking from a train window that some
horses feed near the track and never even pause to look up at the
thundering cars, while just ahead at the next railroad crossing a
farmer's wife will be nervously trying to quiet her scared horse as
the train goes by?
How would you cure a horse that is afraid of cars—graze him in a
back-woods lot where he would never see steam-engines or
automobiles, or drive or pasture him where he would frequently see
the machines?
Apply horse-sense to ridding yourself of self-consciousness and
fear: face an audience as frequently as you can, and you will soon stop shying. You can never attain
freedom from stage-fright by reading a treatise. A book may give
you excellent suggestions on how best to conduct yourself in the
water, but sooner or later you must get wet, perhaps even strangle
and be "half scared to death." There are a great many "wetless"
bathing suits worn at the seashore, but no one ever learns to swim
in them. To plunge is the only way.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

Todd Stocker
“A speaker should approach his preparation not by what he wants to say, but by what he wants to learn.”
Todd Stocker

Nicholas Boothman
“It's much easier to be convincing if you care about your topic. Figure out what's important to you about your message and speak from the heart.”
Nicholas Boothman, Convince Them in 90 Seconds or Less: Make Instant Connections That Pay Off in Business and in Life

Stephen Keague
“Proper Planning and Preparation Prevents Poor Performance”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

Stephen Keague
“No audience ever complained about a presentation or speech being too short”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

Dale Carnegie
“The first
sign of greatness is when a man does not attempt to look and act
great. Before you can call yourself a man at all, Kipling assures
us, you must "not look too good nor talk too wise.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

Stephen Keague
“In presentations or speeches less really is more”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

Stephen Keague
“The audience are likely to remember only three things from your presentation or speech”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

Dale Carnegie
“Blacksmiths sometimes twist a rope tight around the nose of a horse, and by thus inflicting a little pain they distract his attention from the shoeing process. One way to get air out of a
glass is to pour in water. Be Absorbed by Your Subject”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

Amit Kalantri
“All worries are less with wine.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Be a worthy worker and work will come.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

“The customer is always right' may have become a standard motto in the world of business, but the idea that 'the audience is always right,' has yet to make much of an impression on the world of presentation, even though for the duration of the presentation at least, the audience is the speaker's only customer.”
Max Atkinson, Lend Me Your Ears: All You Need to Know about Making Speeches and Presentations

Amit Kalantri
“Father has a strengthening character like the sun and mother has a soothing temper like the moon.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Slavoj Žižek
“€7,500, first-class, everything—and all that for 40 minutes selling them some old stuff.”
Slavoj Žižek

Amit Kalantri
“Health is hearty, health is harmony, health is happiness.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Great losses are great lessons.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

“There is a strange sensation often experienced in the presence
of an audience. It may proceed from the gaze of the many eyes that
turn upon the speaker, especially if he permits himself to steadily
return that gaze. Most speakers have been conscious of this in a
nameless thrill, a real something, pervading the atmosphere,
tangible, evanescent, indescribable. All writers have borne
testimony to the power of a speaker's eye in impressing an
audience. This influence which we are now considering is the
reverse of that picture—the power their eyes may
exert upon him, especially before he begins to speak: after the
inward fires of oratory are fanned into flame the eyes of the
audience lose all terror.”
William Pittenger, Extempore Speech: How to Acquire and Practice It

Pliny the Younger
“So we must work at our profession and not make anybody else's idleness an excuse for our own. There is no lack of readers and listeners; it is for us to produce something worth being written and heard.”
Pliny the Younger, The Letters of the Younger Pliny

Amit Kalantri
“In your name, the family name is at last because it's the family name that lasts.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Hilary Mantel
“Fabre stood up. He placed his fingertips on d‘Anton’s temples. “Put your fingers here,” he said. “Feel the resonance. Put them here, and here.” He jabbed at d’Anton’s face: below the cheekbones, at the side of his jaw. “I’ll teach you like an actor,” he said. “This city is our stage.”
Camille said: “Book of Ezekiel. ‘This city is the cauldron, and we the flesh’ ...”
Fabre turned. “This stutter,” he said. “You don’t have to do it.” Camille put his hands over his eyes. “Leave me alone,” he said. “Even you.” Fabre’s face was incandescent. “Even you, I am going to teach.” He leapt forward, wrenched Camille upright in his chair. He took him by the shoulders and shook him. “You’re going to talk properly,” Fabre said. “Even if it kills one of us.” Camille put his hands protectively over his head. Fabre continued to perpetrate violence; d’Anton was too tired to intervene.”
Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety

Bernard Kelvin Clive
“The crowd shouldn't dictate your performance”
Bernard Kelvin Clive

Farshad Asl
“Communication without clarity is noise. Speak with purpose and you’ll propel your audience to take massive action towards a journey of self-improvement.”
Farshad Asl

“It's much easier to pull in an audience by framing the talk as an attempt to solve an intriguing riddle rather than as a plea for them to care. The first feels like a gift being offered. The second feels like an ask.”
Chris Andersen

“Visualize yourself giving the entire speech as a controlled, confident speaker.”
Ibrahim Mustapha, The Confident Speaker: Tools to Overcome Your Fear in Public Speaking

Alan Alda
“TIPS
Even though I don’t much like them, I have to admit that tips can sometimes be useful. Here are a few that have been good to me.
The Three Rules of Three
1. When I talk to an audience, I try to make no more than three points. (They can’t remember more than three, and neither can I.) In fact, restricting myself to one big point is even better. But three is the limit.
2. I try to explain difficult ideas three different ways. Some people can’t understand something the first couple of ways I say it, but can if I say it another way. This lets them triangulate their way to understanding.
3. I try to find a subtle way to make an important point three times. It sticks a little better.”
Alan Alda, If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?: My Adventures in the Art and Science of Relating and Communicating

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