Music Industry Quotes

Quotes tagged as "music-industry" (showing 1-15 of 15)
Corey Taylor
“Bad music is a form of murder to the true art of music in general.Bad music forced on a child is abuse because it invariably forms that child´s taste in music. Bad music has raped an industry that was held up strongly by great expression for decades but now finds itself floundering, giving in to the lowest common denominator of music just to keep its panties around its waist. Bad music tortures the eardrums and kills little bits of your senses through prolonged exposure. Bad music steals money from shallow pockets, steals airtime from more deserving bands and songwriters, and steals the spotlight from undiscovered geniuses who have all but given up on a dream because of the mediocrity of popular radio. Bad music is a lie, and yet it is foisted on the public in an attempt to turn melodies and songs into hamburgers and fries. Bad music is truly a sin because you don´t have to be exceptional to make it in the music industry anymore. You just have to be good enough to stick around and be tolerated. I understand that bad music is a matter of opinion. I know that. But I am fairly confident that more people agree with me than you suspect.
Bad music is just fucking bad.”
Corey Taylor, Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good

Jackie Williams
“You know the saying? Don't go in if you don't have a skin.”
Jackie Williams, A Perfect Summer

Simon S. Tam
“Your uniqueness is your greatest strength, not how well you emulate others.”
Simon S. Tam

Amit Kalantri
“Music is the fastest motivator in the world.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Music shouldn't be just a tune, it should be a touch.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Shannon McNally
“Well, I know a guy, he's from far far away
He's a songwriter, he got something to say
He says, "People in this city are too busy to hang out
This town's so spread out, no one would hear you if you shout"

Everyone's got a script to sell and someplace else they want to be
There's always a lock that would open if you could just find the key"

(It Ain't Easy Being Green)”
Shannon McNally

Loren Weisman
“Artists of today can be inspired by the past, but they have to apply present methods if they want a future in music.”
Loren Weisman

Loren Weisman
“The most devastating thing artists can do to their career is get in their own way, and way too many people do. It’s not the labels, the industry, the fans, the cities, the economy, the social media, the marketing, the promoting, the “right time,” the music, or whatever other excuse you can come up with that determines whether you succeed or you fail. It is you—no one else.”
Loren Weisman, The Artist's Guide to Success in the Music Business: The “Who, What, When, Where, Why & How” of the Steps that Musicians & Bands Have to Take to Succeed in Music

Loren Weisman
“Only Getting the A and Z with out the B through Y, leaves you SOL.”
Loren Weisman, The Artist's Guide to Success in the Music Business (2nd edition): The "Who, What, When, Where, Why & How" of the Steps that Musicians & Bands Have to Take to Succeed in Music

Loren Weisman
“The most devastating thing artists can do to their career is get in their own way, and way too many people do. It's not the labels, the industry, the fans, the cities, the economy, the social media, the marketing, the promoting, the 'right time,' the music, or whatever other excuse you can come up with that determines whether you succeed or you fail. It is you, no one else,”
Loren Weisman, The Artist's Guide to Success in the Music Business (2nd edition): The "Who, What, When, Where, Why & How" of the Steps that Musicians & Bands Have to Take to Succeed in Music

“The marketing geniuses on the corporate side of the country music labels had decided to start using focus groups to test their products before they were developed or released. An example of this would be to ask the focus group whether they liked sad songs or happy songs. “We like happy songs!” the focus group would chirp, and the word would go back to the writers and producers to come up with “happy” songs to record. This made it especially hard on the songwriters, who rarely feel a need to write when they are happy, as then they are busy luxuriating in the pleasure of happiness. When something bad happens, they want to find a way to transcend it, so they write a song about it. When Hank Williams, one of the greatest and most successful country artists of all time, wrote a song like “Your Cheatin’ Heart” or “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” he wasn’t writing “happy” songs, yet they made the listener feel better. The listener could feel that someone else had gone through an experience similar to the listener’s own, and then went to the trouble and effort to write it down accurately and share the experience like a compassionate friend might do. In this way, hearing a song like “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” could make the listener feel better, or “happy.”
Linda Ronstadt, Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir

“It's not my job to tell people how to consume music. I just want them to consume music.”
Eric Alper

Simon S. Tam
“Success in the music industry isn’t something that you wait for or hope for. It is something that you create, day after day.”
Simon S. Tam, Music Business Hacks

Loren Weisman
“The average artist has a naïve, unrealistic, and disconnected view of what the music industry is, how it works, what is involved in “making it”, and what actually is happening behind the scenes. Too many artists take at face value what they see on some TV documentary or read in a fan magazine. Whether you are working with others in a band, looking to connect with a manager, an agent, a label, or an investor, or you just want to work in the industry, it is more crucial than ever to know what you are working for and toward.”
Loren Weisman, The Artist's Guide to Success in the Music Business: The “Who, What, When, Where, Why & How” of the Steps that Musicians & Bands Have to Take to Succeed in Music

Loren Weisman
“Try not to sound like those singer-songwriters that go on and on with ten-minute, barely intelligible stories that everyone endures until the next song starts.”
Loren Weisman, The Artist's Guide to Success in the Music Business (2nd edition): The "Who, What, When, Where, Why & How" of the Steps that Musicians & Bands Have to Take to Succeed in Music

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