Courtesy Quotes

Quotes tagged as "courtesy" Showing 1-30 of 88
Shannon L. Alder
“A true gentleman is one that apologizes anyways, even though he has not offended a lady intentionally. He is in a class all of his own because he knows the value of a woman's heart.”
Shannon Alder

Dumas Malone
“The boldness of his mind was sheathed in a scabbard of politeness.”
Dumas Malone, Jefferson the Virginian

Bryant McGill
“No one is more insufferable than he who lacks basic courtesy.”
Bryant McGill

“Courtesy costs nothing, but buys everything.”
Hazrat Ali ibn Abu-Talib A.S

Shannon L. Alder
“Don’t ever stray from yourself, in order to be close to someone that doesn’t have the courtesy to remind you of your worth, or the integrity of a gentleman to walk you home.”
Shannon L. Alder

Roman Payne
“She was so delicate that, while we sat beneath the linden branches, a leaf would fall and drift down and touch her skin, and it would leave a bruise. So as we sat in the afternoon hour, beneath that fragrant linden bower, I had to chase all of the leafs that fell away.”
Roman Payne

Lemony Snicket
“Off with you" is a phrase used by people who lack the curtesy to say something more polite, such as, "if there's nothing else you require I must be going" or "I'm sorry but I'm going to have to ask you to leave, please" or even "excuse me but I believe you have mistaken my home for your own and my valuable belongings for yours and I must ask you to return the items in question to me and leave my home after untying me from this chair, as I'm unable to do it myself, if it's not too much trouble.”
Lemony Snicket, The Penultimate Peril

Herman Melville
“I'll try a pagan friend, thought I, since Christian kindness has proved but hollow courtesy.”
Herman Melville

Henry Clay
“Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.”
Henry Clay

Amit Kalantri
“Politeness is the first thing people lose once they get the power.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Henry David Thoreau
“A man can suffocate on courtesy.”
Henry David Thoreau

Germaine de Staël-Holstein
“Politeness is the art of choosing among your thoughts.”
Madame de Stael

Lawrence Goldstone
“You can demand courtesy but you have to earn respect.”
Lawrence Goldstone

Judith Martin
“Nowadays, we never allow ourselves the convenience of being temporarily unavailable, even to strangers. With telephone and beeper, people subject themselves to being instantly accessible to everyone at all times, and it is the person who refuses to be on call, rather than the importunate caller, who is considered rude.”
Judith Martin, Common Courtesy: In Which Miss Manners Solves the Problem That Baffled Mr. Jefferson

Georgette Heyer
“[He was aware] of the value of the word of praise dropped at exactly the right moment; and he would have thought himself extremely stupid to withhold what cost him so little and was productive of such desirable results.”
Georgette Heyer, Sylvester

Sheldon Vanauken
“Whatever one of us asked the other to do - it was assumed the asker would weigh all the consequences - the other would do. Thus one might wake the other in the night and ask for a cup of water; and the other would peacefully (and sleepily) fetch it. We, in fact, defined courtesy as 'a cup of water in the night'. And we considered it a very great courtesy to ask for the cup as well as to fetch it.”
Sheldon Vanauken, A Severe Mercy: A Story of Faith, Tragedy and Triumph

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“As we are, so we do; and as we do, so is it done to us; we are the builders of our fortunes.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Vera Nazarian
“Passion and courtesy are two polar opposite traits that serve to balance each other into a full-blooded whole.

Without socialization, passion is a crude barbarian, and without passion, the elegant and polite are dead.

Allow both passion and courtesy into your life in equal measure, and be complete.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Lynne Truss
“...when a phone call competes for attention with a real-world conversation, it wins. Everyone knows the distinctive high-and-dry feeling of being abandoned for a phone call, and of having to compensate - with quite elaborate behaviours = for the sudden half-disappearance of the person we were just speaking to. 'Go ahead!' we say. 'Don't mind us! Oh look, here's a magazine I can read!' When the call is over, other rituals come into play, to minimise the disruption caused and to restore good feeling.”
Lynne Truss, Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of the World Today, or Six Good Reasons to Stay Home and Bolt the Door

Judith Martin
“Nobody believes that the man who says, 'Look, lady, you wanted equality,' to explain why he won't give up his seat to a pregnant woman carrying three grocery bags, a briefcase, and a toddler is seized with the symbolism of idealism.”
Judith Martin, Common Courtesy: In Which Miss Manners Solves the Problem That Baffled Mr. Jefferson

Judith Martin
“One reason that the task of inventing manners is so difficult is that etiquette is folk custom, and people have emotional ties to the forms of their youth. That is why there is such hostility between generations in times of rapid change; their manners being different, each feels affronted by the other, taking even the most surface choices for challenges.”
Judith Martin, Common Courtesy: In Which Miss Manners Solves the Problem That Baffled Mr. Jefferson

Benjamin Franklin
“A Swedish minister having assembled the chiefs of the Susquehanna Indians, made a sermon to them, acquainting them with the principal historical facts on which our religion is founded — such as the fall of our first parents by eating an apple, the coming of Christ to repair the mischief, his miracles and suffering, etc. When he had finished an Indian orator stood up to thank him.

‘What you have told us,’ says he, ‘is all very good. It is indeed bad to eat apples. It is better to make them all into cider. We are much obliged by your kindness in coming so far to tell us those things which you have heard from your mothers. In return, I will tell you some of those we have heard from ours.

‘In the beginning, our fathers had only the flesh of animals to subsist on, and if their hunting was unsuccessful they were starving. Two of our young hunters, having killed a deer, made a fire in the woods to boil some parts of it. When they were about to satisfy their hunger, they beheld a beautiful young woman descend from the clouds and seat herself on that hill which you see yonder among the Blue Mountains.

‘They said to each other, “It is a spirit that perhaps has smelt our broiling venison and wishes to eat of it; let us offer some to her.” They presented her with the tongue; she was pleased with the taste of it and said: “Your kindness shall be rewarded; come to this place after thirteen moons, and you will find something that will be of great benefit in nourishing you and your children to the latest generations.” They did so, and to their surprise found plants they had never seen before, but which from that ancient time have been constantly cultivated among us to our great advantage. Where her right hand had touched the ground they found maize; where her left had touched it they found kidney-beans; and where her backside had sat on it they found tobacco.’

The good missionary, disgusted with this idle tale, said: ‘What I delivered to you were sacred truths; but what you tell me is mere fable, fiction, and falsehood.’

The Indian, offended, replied: ‘My brother, it seems your friends have not done you justice in your education; they have not well instructed you in the rules of common civility. You saw that we, who understand and practise those rules, believed all your stories; why do you refuse to believe ours?”
Benjamin Franklin, Remarks Concerning the Savages

Andrew Ashling
“Oh, hon, it's the little courtesies that make life bearable, I find, wouldn't you agree?”
Andrew Ashling, The Invisible Chains - Part 1: Bonds of Hate

Harper Lee
“Если ты человек вежливый, говори с другими не про то, что интересно тебе, а про то, что интересно им.”
Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Vinnie Tesla
“Perhaps if you were to refrain from deploying the phrase ‘ignorant
buffoon’ with a liberality most writers reserve for ‘it’ and ‘the,’
you would find a readier audience.”
Vinnie Tesla, The Erotofluidic Age

Mette Ivie Harrison
“Your name?" George asked him directly. He had probably seen the man a dozen times before yet did not know anything about him. King Davit would have no doubt have known half the man's history already.
"Henry."
George took Henry's hand firmly in his own and looked into his eyes. This had to be done delicately, to make sure this Henry did not think him a fool. He tried to think of how his father would do it.
"Thank you, Henry, for your concern. It is a comfort to know I am so well guarded. I will make sure to praise you when next I speak to the lord general. But for now I think there is no need to worry.”
Mette Ivie Harrison, The Princess and the Hound

Amit Kalantri
“Kind people are the best kind of people.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Be patient when you have nothing, be polite when you have everything.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Be courteous to see your mistakes, courageous to accept them, and clever enough to correct them.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“Have strong mind, soft heart and sacred soul.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

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