Falsehood Quotes

Quotes tagged as "falsehood" Showing 1-30 of 207
Edith Wharton
“The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!”
Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

Criss Jami
“The only thing more frustrating than slanderers is those foolish enough to listen to them.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

William Shakespeare
“God hath given you one face, and you make yourself another.”
Shakespeare, Hamlet

Euripides
“When one with honeyed words but evil mind
Persuades the mob, great woes befall the state.”
Euripides, Orestes

Harold Pinter
“There are some things one remembers even though they may never have happened.”
Harold Pinter, Old Times

Max Brooks
“Lies are neither bad nor good. Like a fire they can either keep you warm or burn you to death, depending on how they're used.”
Max Brooks, World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War

Criss Jami
“Like crying wolf, if you keep looking for sympathy as a justification for your actions, you will someday be left standing alone when you really need help.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Aesop
“A doubtful friend is worse than a certain enemy. Let a man be one thing or the other, and we then know how to meet him.”
Aesop, Aesop's Fables

Blaise Pascal
“Truth is so obscure in these times, and falsehood so established, that, unless we love the truth, we cannot know it.”
Blaise Pascal

Christine de Pizan
“Those who plead their cause in the absence of an opponent can invent to their heart's content, can pontificate without taking into account the opposite point of view and keep the best arguments for themselves, for aggressors are always quick to attack those who have no means of defence.”
Christine de Pizan, Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

Vera Nazarian
“There's a difference between playing and playing games. The former is an act of joy, the latter — an act.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Italo Calvino
“Falsehood is never in words; it is in things.”
Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

Thomas A. Edison
“Study, along the lines which the theologies have mapped, will never lead us to discovery of the fundamental facts of our existence. That goal must be attained by means of exact science and can only be achieved by such means. The fact that man, for ages, has superstitiously believed in what he calls a God does not prove at all that his theory has been right. There have been many gods – all makeshifts, born of inability to fathom the deep fundamental truth. There must be something at the bottom of existence, and man, in ignorance, being unable to discover what it is through reason, because his reason has been so imperfect, undeveloped, has used, instead, imagination, and created figments, of one kind or another, which, according to the country he was born in, the suggestions of his environment, satisfied him for the time being. Not one of all the gods of all the various theologies has ever really been proved. We accept no ordinary scientific fact without the final proof; why should we, then, be satisfied in this most mighty of all matters, with a mere theory?

Destruction of false theories will not decrease the sum of human happiness in future, any more than it has in the past... The days of miracles have passed. I do not believe, of course, that there was ever any day of actual miracles. I cannot understand that there were ever any miracles at all. My guide must be my reason, and at thought of miracles my reason is rebellious. Personally, I do not believe that Christ laid claim to doing miracles, or asserted that he had miraculous power...

Our intelligence is the aggregate intelligence of the cells which make us up. There is no soul, distinct from mind, and what we speak of as the mind is just the aggregate intelligence of cells. It is fallacious to declare that we have souls apart from animal intelligence, apart from brains. It is the brain that keeps us going. There is nothing beyond that.

Life goes on endlessly, but no more in human beings than in other animals, or, for that matter, than in vegetables. Life, collectively, must be immortal, human beings, individually, cannot be, as I see it, for they are not the individuals – they are mere aggregates of cells.

There is no supernatural. We are continually learning new things. There are powers within us which have not yet been developed and they will develop. We shall learn things of ourselves, which will be full of wonders, but none of them will be beyond the natural.

[Columbian Magazine interview]”
Thomas A. Edison

Guy de Maupassant
“Everything is false, everything is possible, everything is doubtful.”
Guy de Maupassant, Complete Works

Elizabeth Gaskell
“Oh! that look of love!" continued he, between his teeth, as he bolted himself into his own private room. "And that cursed lie; which showed some terrible shame in the background, to be kept from the light in which I thought she lived perpetually! Oh, Margaret, Margaret! Mother, how you have tortured me! Oh! Margaret, could you not have loved me? I am but uncouth and hard, but I would never have led you into any falsehood for me.”
Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South

Ludwig Feuerbach
“I would rather be a devil in alliance with truth, than an angel in alliance with falsehood.”
Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity

Jonathan Swift
“Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it, so that when men come to be undeceived, it is too late; the jest is over, and the tale hath had its effect: like a man, who hath thought of a good repartee when the discourse is changed, or the company parted; or like a physician, who hath found out an infallible medicine, after the patient is dead.”
Jonathan Swift

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg
“The most dangerous of all falsehoods is a slightly distorted truth.”
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, The Waste Books

Aristophanes
“To win the people, always cook them some savoury that pleases them.”
Aristophanes, The Knights

William Shakespeare
“Rumour is a pipe
Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures
And of so easy and so plain a stop
That the blunt monster with uncounted heads,
The still-discordant wavering multitude,
Can play upon it.”
William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2

William Shakespeare
“So may the outward shows be least themselves:
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt,
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.”
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

Robert G. Ingersoll
“Arguments cannot be answered by personal abuse; there is no logic in slander, and falsehood, in the long run, defeats itself.”
Robert G. Ingersoll, Some Mistakes of Moses

Richard Brinsley Sheridan
“Tale-bearers are as bad as the tale-makers.”
Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The School for Scandal

William Shakespeare
“DON PEDRO
Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick.

BEATRICE
Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for his single one: marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it.

DON PEDRO
You have put him down, lady, you have put him down.

BEATRICE
So I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Charles Dickens
“If I may ride with you, Citizen Evremonde, will you let me hold your hand? I am not afraid, but I am little and weak, and it will give me more courage." As the patient eyes were lifted to his face, he saw a sudden doubt in them, and then astonishment. He pressed the work-worn, hunger-worn young fingers, and touched his lips.
"Are you dying for him?" she whispered.
"And his wife and child. Hush! Yes."
"Oh, you will let me hold your brave hand, stranger?"
"Hush! Yes, my poor sister; to the last.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Martin
“Well...letting the cat out of the bag is a lot easier than putting it in.”
Charles Martin, Chasing Fireflies

William Shakespeare
“Enter RUMOUR, painted full of tongues."

[Stage direction, Henry IV, Part 2, Induction]”
William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2

“If the Creator stood before a million men with the light of a million lamps, only a few would truly see him because truth is already alive in their hearts. Truth can only be seen by those with truth in them. He who does not have Truth in his heart, will always be blind to it.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Sherwood Smith
“I've been working hard at assuming Court polish, but the more I learn about what really goes on behind the pretty voices and waving fans and graceful bows, the more I comprehend that what is really said matters little, so long as the manner in which it is said pleases. I understand it, but I don't like it. Were I truly influential, then I would halt this foolishness that decrees that in Court one cannot be sick; that to admit you are sick is really to admit to political or social or romantic defeat; that to admit to any emotions usually means one really feels the opposite. It is a terrible kind of falsehood that people can only claim feelings as a kind of social weapon.”
Sherwood Smith, Court Duel

Rick DeStefanis
“Truth has a resonance to it that fills the cracks where falsehoods lie.”
Rick DeStefanis

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