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Christine de Pizan

Christine de Pizan’s Followers (153)

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Christine de Pizan


Born
in Venice, Italy
November 30, 1362

Died
November 26, 1433


Christine de Pizan (also seen as de Pisan) (1363–c.1434) was a writer and analyst of the medieval era who strongly challenged misogyny and stereotypes that were prevalent in the male-dominated realm of the arts. De Pizan completed forty-one pieces during her thirty-year career (1399–1429). She earned her accolade as Europe’s first professional woman writer (Redfern 74). Her success stems from a wide range of innovative writing and rhetorical techniques that critically challenged renowned male writers such as Jean de Meun who, to Pizan’s dismay, incorporated misogynist beliefs within their literary works.

In recent decades, de Pizan's work has been returned to prominence by the efforts of scholars such as Charity Cannon Willard and Earl Jeffr
...more

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More books by Christine de Pizan…
Quotes by Christine de Pizan  (?)
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“Those who plead their cause in the absence of an opponent can invent to their heart's content, can pontificate without taking into account the opposite point of view and keep the best arguments for themselves, for aggressors are always quick to attack those who have no means of defence.”
Christine de Pizan, Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

“Ah, child and youth, if you knew the bliss which resides in the taste of knowledge, and the evil and ugliness that lies in ignorance, how well you are advised to not complain of the pain and labor of learning.”
Christine de Pizan, The Treasure of the City of Ladies

“Yet if women are so flighty, fickle, changeable, susceptible, and inconstant (as some clerks would have us believe), why is it that their suitors have to resort to such trickery to have their way with them? And why don't women quickly succumb to them, without the need for all this skill and ingenuity in conquering them? For there is no need to go to war for a castle that is already captured. (...)

Therefore, since it is necessary to call on such skill, ingenuity, and effort in order to seduce a woman, whether of high or humble birth, the logical conclusion to draw is that women are by no means as fickle as some men claim, or as easily influenced in their behaviour. And if anyone tells me that books are full of women like these, it is this very reply, frequently given, which causes me to complain. My response is that women did not write these books nor include the material which attacks them and their morals. Those who plead their cause in the absence of an opponent can invent to their heart's content, can pontificate without taking into account the opposite point of view and keep the best arguments for themselves, for aggressors are always quick to attack those who have no means of defence. But if women had written these books, I know full well the subject would have been handled differently. They know that they stand wrongfully accused, and that the cake has not been divided up equally, for the strongest take the lion's share, and the one who does the sharing out keeps the biggest portion for himself.”
Christine de Pizan, Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

Polls

October 2022 Old School Classics Read Poll

Thérèse Raquin by Émile Zola, 1867, 201pp
 
  50 votes, 22.5%

 
  43 votes, 19.4%

Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz, 1858, 216pp
 
  38 votes, 17.1%

 
  29 votes, 13.1%

Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov, 1859, 586pp
 
  27 votes, 12.2%

 
  24 votes, 10.8%

Caleb Williams by William Godwin, 1794, 374pp
 
  11 votes, 5.0%

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Topics Mentioning This Author

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