Stoics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "stoics" (showing 1-19 of 19)
Jenny Offill
“A thought experiment courtesy of the Stoics. If you are tired of everything you possess, imagine that you have lost all these things.”
Jenny Offill, Dept. of Speculation

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“We love being mentally strong, but we hate situations that allow us to put our mental strength to good use.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Some of the best things that have ever happened to us wouldn’t have happened to us, if it weren’t for some of the worst things that have ever happened to us.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Oliver Burkeman
“For the Stoics, then, our judgments about the world are all that we can control, but also all that we need to control in order to be happy; tranquility results from replacing our irrational judgments with rational ones”
Oliver Burkeman, The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking

Oliver Burkeman
“And here lies the essential difference between Stoicism and the modern-day 'cult of optimism.' For the Stoics, the ideal state of mind was tranquility, not the excitable cheer that positive thinkers usually seem to mean when they use the word, 'happiness.' And tranquility was to be achieved not by strenuously chasing after enjoyable experiences, but by cultivating a kind of calm indifference towards one's circumstances.”
Oliver Burkeman, The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking

Julian Huxley
“But if God and immortality be repudiated, what is left? That is the question usually thrown at the atheist's head. The orthodox believer likes to think that nothing is left. That, however, is because he has only been accustomed to think in terms of his orthodoxy. In point of fact, a great deal is left.

That is immediately obvious from the fact that many men and women have led active, or self-sacrificing, or noble, or devoted lives without any belief in God or immortality. Buddhism in its uncorrupted form has no such belief; nor did the great nineteenth-century agnostics; nor do the orthodox Russian Communists; nor did the Stoics. Of course, the unbelievers have often been guilty of selfish or wicked actions; but so have the believers. And in any case that is not the fundamental point. The point: is that without these beliefs men and women may yet possess the mainspring of full and purposive living, and just as strong a sense that existence can be worth while as is possible to the most devout believers.”
Julian Huxley, Man in the Modern World

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Death devours not only those who have been cooked by old age; it also feasts on those who are half-cooked and even those who are raw.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Use and Misuse of Children

Epictetus
“Man, what are you talking about? Me in chains? You may fetter my leg but my will, not even Zeus himself can overpower.”
Epictetus, The Discourses

Thomas Henry Huxley
“In order to get over the ethical difficulties presented by the naive naturalism of many parts of those Scriptures, in the divine authority of which he firmly believed, Philo borrowed from the Stoics (who had been in like straits in respect of Greek mythology), that great Excalibur which they had forged with infinite pains and skill—the method of allegorical interpretation. This mighty 'two-handed engine at the door' of the theologian is warranted to make a speedy end of any and every moral or intellectual difficulty, by showing that, taken allegorically or, as it is otherwise said, 'poetically' or, 'in a spiritual sense,' the plainest words mean whatever a pious interpreter desires they should mean.”
Thomas Henry Huxley, The Evolution Of Theology: An Anthropological Study

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“It takes courage to speak or react way slower than you think.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Suffering adds spice to life.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

“At first sight nothing seems more obvious than that everything has a beginning and an end, and that everything can be subdivided into smaller parts. Nevertheless, for entirely speculative reasons the philosophers of Antiquity, especially the Stoics, concluded this concept to be quite unnecessary. The prodigious development of physics has now reached the same conclusion as those philosophers, Empedocles and Democritus in particular, who lived around 500 B.C.E. and for whom even ancient man had a lively admiration.”
Svante Arrhenius

Epictetus
“Consider when, on a voyage, your ship is anchored; if you go on shore to get water you may along the way amuse yourself with picking up a shellfish, or an onion. However, your thoughts and continual attention ought to be bent towards the ship, waiting for the captain to call on board; you must then immediately leave all these things, otherwise you will be thrown into the ship, bound neck and feet like a sheep. So it is with life. If, instead of an onion or a shellfish, you are given a wife or child, that is fine.”
Epictetus, The Enchiridion: By Epictetus - Illustrated
tags: stoics

Marcus Aurelius
“Man, what are you talking about? Me in chains? You may fetter my leg but my will, not even Zeus himself can overpower.”
Marcus Aurelius

Luke Lively
“Well, that's what I still think, but I am in a rut at work--I hate my job,' I said, allowing my emotions to find words.”
Luke Lively

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“An action is at least a billion times less difficult to choose than a reaction.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana