Profound Quotes

Quotes tagged as "profound" Showing 1-30 of 373
Mitch Albom
“All endings are also beginnings. We just don't know it at the time.”
Mitch Albom, The Five People You Meet In Heaven

Chuck Klosterman
“Art and love are the same thing: It’s the process of seeing yourself in things that are not you.”
Chuck Klosterman, Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story

J.M. Barrie
“The reason birds can fly and we can't is simply because they have perfect faith, for to have faith is to have wings.”
J.M. Barrie, The Little White Bird

Jane Austen
“Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Lao Tzu
“At the center of your being
you have the answer;
you know who you are
and you know what you want.”
Lao Tzu

Milan Kundera
“We can never know what to want, because, living only one life, we can neither compare it with our previous lives nor perfect it in our lives to come.”
Milan Kundera

Sylvia Plath
“I told him I believed in hell, and that certain people, like me, had to live in hell before they died, to make up for missing out on it after death, since they didn't believe in life after death, and what each person believed happened to him when he died.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

Sanober  Khan
“The splendid thing
about falling apart
silently...
is that
you can start over
as many times
as you like.”
Sanober Khan, A Thousand Flamingos

Craig Thompson
“How satisfying it is to leave a mark on a blank surface. To make a map of my movement - no matter how temporary.”
Craig Thompson, Blankets

Steve Jobs
“Taking LSD was a profound experience, one of the most important things in my life. LSD shows you that there’s another side to the coin, and you can’t remember it when it wears off, but you know it. It reinforced my sense of what was important—creating great things instead of making money, putting things back into the stream of history and of human consciousness as much as I could.”
Steve Jobs

Mitch Albom
“It is not until much later, as the skin sags and the heart weakens, that children understand; their stories, and all their accomplishments, sit atop the stories of their mothers and fathers, stones upon stones, beneath the waters of their lives.”
Mitch Albom, The Five People You Meet in Heaven

Criss Jami
“I imagine that the intelligent people are the ones so intelligent that they don't even need or want to look 'intelligent' anymore.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Annie Dillard
“You've got to jump off cliffs all the time and build your wings on the way down.”
Annie Dillard

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“If our impulses were confined to hunger, thirst, and desire, we might be nearly free; but now we are moved by every wind that blows and a chance word or scene that that word may convey to us.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Sanober  Khan
“lean in to kiss me
in all the places

where the ache
is
the most special.”
Sanober Khan

Deb Caletti
“You can forget that other people carry pieces of your own story around in their heads. I've always thought--put together all those random pieces form everyone who's ever known you from your parents to the guy who once sat next to you on a bus, and you'd probably see a fuller version of your life than you even did while living it.”
Deb Caletti, Stay

Sanober  Khan
“I had embraced you...
long before i hugged you.”
Sanober Khan, A Thousand Flamingos

Charles Darwin
“...But I own that I cannot see as plainly as others do, and as I should wish to do, evidence of design and beneficence on all sides of us. There seems to me too much misery in the world. I cannot persuade myself that a beneficent and omnipotent God would have designedly created the Ichneumonidæ with the express intention of their feeding within the living bodies of Caterpillars, or that a cat should play with mice... I feel most deeply that the whole subject is too profound for the human intellect. A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton. Let each man hope and believe what he can.”
Charles Darwin, The Life & Letters of Charles Darwin

Deb Caletti
“People can attach themselves to something--an idea, another person, a desire--with an impossibly strong grip, and in the case of restless ghosts, a grip stronger than death. Will is a powerful thing. Will--it's supposed to be a good treat, a more determined and persistent version of determination and persistence. But will and obsession--they sit right next to each other. They pretend to be strangers and all the while meet secretly at midnight." -”
Deb Caletti, Stay

Michael Bassey Johnson
“A virtuos woman is not moved by big names and flamboyance, but only men of profound wisdom and integrity move her.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Edgar Allan Poe
“That is another of your odd notions," said the Prefect, who had a fashion of calling every thing "odd" that was beyond his comprehension, and thus lived amid an absolute legion of "oddities.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Purloined Letter

Surya  Das
“Forgiveness means letting go of the hope for a better past.”
Lama Surya Das

Douglas Adams
“The car shot forward straight into the circle of light, and suddenly Arthur had a fairly clear idea of what infinity looked like.

It wasn’t infinity in fact. Infinity itself looks flat and uninteresting. Looking up into the night sky is looking into infinity—distance is incomprehensible and therefore meaningless. The chamber into which the aircar emerged was anything but infinite, it was just very very very big, so big that it gave the impression of infinity far better than infinity itself.”
Douglas Adams

Markus Zusak
“It was Russia, January 5, 1943, and just another icy day. Out among the city and snow, there were dead Russians and Germans everywhere. Those who remained were firing into the blank pages in front of them. Three languages interwove. The Russian, the bullets, the German.”
Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

Criss Jami
“A sign of a lover of wisdom is his delight in not running his mouth about things he doesn't know.”
Criss Jami, Diotima, Battery, Electric Personality

Chris Crutcher
“From a distance,' he says, 'my car looks just like every other car on the freeway, and Sarah Byrnes looks just like the rest of us. And if she's going to get help, she'll get it from herself or she'll get it from us. Let me tell you why I brought this up. Because the other day when I saw how hard it was for Mobe to go to the hospital to see her, I was embarrassed that I didn't know her better, that I ever laughed at one joke about her. I was embarrassed that I let some kid go to school with me for twelve years and turned my back on pain that must be unbearable. I was embarrassed that I haven't found a way to include her somehow the way Mobe has.'

Jesus. I feel tears welling up, and I see them running down Ellerby's cheeks. Lemry better get a handle on this class before it turns into some kind of therapy group.

So,' Lemry says quietly, 'your subject will be the juxtaposition of man and God in the universe?'

Ellerby shakes his head. 'My subject will be shame.”
Chris Crutcher, Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Some of us were brought into this troubled world primarily or only to increase our fathers’ chances of not being left by our mothers, or vice versa.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Use and Misuse of Children

James Baldwin
“Dickens has not seen it all. The wretched of the earth do not decide to become extinct, they resolve, on the contrary, to multiply: life is their only weapon against life, life is all that they have. This is why the dispossessed and starving will never be convinced (though some may be coerced) by the population-control programs of the civilized. I have watched the dispossessed and starving laboring in the fields which others own, with their transistor radios at their ear, all day long: so they learn, for example, along with equally weighty matters, that the pope, one of the heads of the civilized world, forbids to the civilized that abortion which is being, literally, forced on them, the wretched. The civilized have created the wretched, quite coldly and deliberately, and do not intend to change the status quo; are responsible for their slaughter and enslavement; rain down bombs on defenseless children whenever and wherever they decide that their ‘vital interests’ are menaced, and think nothing of torturing a man to death: these people are not to be taken seriously when they speak of the ‘sanctity’ of human life, or the ‘conscience’ of the civilized world. There is a ‘sanctity’ involved with bringing a child into this world: it is better than bombing one out of it. Dreadful indeed it is to see a starving child, but the answer to that is not to prevent the child’s arrival but to restructure the world so that the child can live in it: so that the ‘vital interest’ of the world becomes nothing less than the life of the child. However—I could not have said any of this then, nor is so absurd a notion about to engulf the world now. But we were all starving children, after all, and none of our fathers, even at their most embittered and enraged, had ever suggested that we ‘die out.’ It was not we who were supposed to die out: this was, of all notions, the most forbidden, and we learned this from the cradle. Every trial, every beating, every drop of blood, every tear, were meant to be used by us for a day that was coming—for a day that was certainly coming, absolutely certainly, certainly coming: not for us, perhaps, but for our children. The children of the despised and rejected are menaced from the moment they stir in the womb, and are therefore sacred in a way that the children of the saved are not. And the children know it, which is how they manage to raise their children, and why they will not be persuaded—by their children’s murderers, after all—to cease having children.”
James Baldwin, The Devil Finds Work

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