Literary Quotes

Quotes tagged as "literary" (showing 1-30 of 182)
Rafael Sabatini
“He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.”
Rafael Sabatini, Scaramouche

Neil Gaiman
“The sky had never seemed so sky; the world had never seemed so world.”
Neil Gaiman, Coraline

Neil Gaiman
“There's a but, isn't there?" said Coraline. "I can feel it. Like a rain cloud.”
Neil Gaiman, Coraline

Virginia Woolf
“All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of Aphra Behn, for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds.”
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Henry Fielding
“No one hath seen beauty in its highest lustre who hath never seen it in distress.”
Henry Fielding, Tom Jones

D. Harlan Wilson
“Reality is shaped by the forces that destroy it.”
D. Harlan Wilson, The Kyoto Man

Robert Cormier
“He was intrigued by the power of words, not the literary words that filled the books in the library but the sharp, staccato words that went into the writing of news stories. Words that went for the jugular. Active verbs that danced and raced on the page.”
Robert Cormier, I Am the Cheese

Roman Payne
“What is a Wanderess? Bound by no boundaries, contained by no countries, tamed by no time, she is the force of nature’s course.”
Roman Payne, The Wanderess

David McCullough
“When a friend of Abigail and John Adams was killed at Bunker Hill, Abigail's response was to write a letter to her husband and include these words, "My bursting heart must find vent at my pen.”
David McCullough, John Adams

Henry Miller
“They never opened the door which leads to the soul.”
Henry Miller

Mo Willems
“I always say, 'Books beat boredom,' said Amanda wisely.”
Mo Willems, Hooray for Amanda & Her Alligator!

Cora Carmack
“Phaedra keeps saying she's being selfish. That she hates herself for it, but she does it anyway. She can't deny herself what she wants, even if it brings about her downfall and his." "And have you learned anything from our literary parallel?" "Not really, I keep thinking that she would do it all over again if there were a chance...a chance that it could go right. Even if 99 times out of a 100 the story ends badly, it's worth it if only once she gets a happy ending.”
Cora Carmack, Losing It

Roman Payne
“Who’s to say what a ‘literary life’ is? As long as you are writing often, and writing well, you don’t need to be hanging-out in libraries all the time.
Nightclubs are great literary research centers. So is Ibiza!”
Roman Payne, Cities & Countries

T.S. Eliot
“James's critical genius comes out most tellingly in his mastery over, his baffling escape from, Ideas; a mastery and an escape which are perhaps the last test of a superior intelligence. He had a mind so fine that no idea could violate it. [...] In England, ideas run wild and pasture on the emotions; instead of thinking with our feelings (a very different thing) we corrupt our feelings with ideas; we produce the public, the political, the emotional idea, evading sensation and thought. [...] James in his novels is like the best French critics in maintaining a point of view, a view-point untouched by the parasite idea. He is the most intelligent man of his generation."

(Little Review, 1918)”
T.S. Eliot

Janet Goodfriend
“Because you live to love and love to live/ And because of what your heardrum will give/ Now we might love to live and live to love.”
Janet Goodfriend, For the Love of Art

Margaret Atwood
“Anybody who writes a book is an optimist. First of all, they think they're going to finish it. Second, they think somebody's going to publish it. Third, they think somebody's going to read it. Fourth, they think somebody's going to like it. How optimistic is that?”
Margaret Atwood

G.F. Smith
“What is more precious: a thousand answers derived from one question? Or, one answer…from a thousand questions?”
G.F. Smith

D. Biswas
“Love enters later in life through the cracks left by the first heartbreak.”
D. Biswas, A to Z Stories of Life and Death

Jacques Barzun
“The book, like the bicycle, is a perfect form.”
Jacques Barzun, From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life, 1500 to the Present

Jane Austen
“This was a lucky recollection -- it saved her from something like regret.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Donna Jo Napoli
“If you fall into water, you may still be saved. But if you fall down in literary matters, there is no life left for you.”
Donna Jo Napoli, Bound

Taylor Caldwell
“. . . a statement that is repugnant to one's beliefs can be as true as one that is pleasurable.”
Taylor Caldwell, Dear and Glorious Physician

Lauren Oliver
“Do you want any breakfast, Sam?” my mom asks. I never eat breakfast at home, but my mom still asks me every day—when she catches me before I duck out, anyway—and in that moment I realize how much I love the little everyday routines of my life: the fact that she always asks, the fact that I always say no because there’s a sesame bagel waiting for me in Lindsay’s car, the fact that we always listen to “No More Drama” as we pull into the parking lot. The fact that my mom always cooks spaghetti and meatballs on Sunday, and the fact that once a month my dad takes over the kitchen and makes his “special stew” which is just hot-dog pieces and baked beans and lots of extra ketchup and molasses, and I would never admit to liking it, but it’s actually one of my favorite meals. The details that are my life’s special pattern, like how in handwoven rugs what really makes them unique are the tiny flaws in the stitching, little gaps and jumps and stutters that can never be reproduced.”
Lauren Oliver, Before I Fall

“The significant difference between Proust and Faulkner, for Sartre, is that where Proust discovers salvation in time, in the recovery of time past, for Faulkner time is never lost, however much he may want, like a mystic, to forget time. Both writers emphasize the transitoriness of emotion, of the condition of love or misery, or whatever passes because it is transitory in time. "Proust really should have employed a technique like Faulkner's," Sartre legislates, "that was the logical outcome of his metaphysic. Faulkner, however, is a lost man, and because he knows that he is lost he risks pushing his thoughts to its conclusion. Proust is a classicist and a Frenchman; and the French lose themselves with caution and always end by finding themselves.”
John McCormick

C.S. Lewis
“Naturally, since I myself am a writer, I do not wish the ordinary reader to read no modern books. But if he must read only the new or only the old, I would advise him to read the old.”
C.S. Lewis

C.A.  Conrad
“In a world of watered-down bestsellers and formula novels, Hitching to Nirvana eases back just enough to show the blade which cuts the real open, then bolts forward again, giving us a charged, swerving dance to self-actualization. Hitching to Nirvana is a magnetic forcefield, not just pulling us beautifully into the story, but into our own lives. It's rare when a writer can open the shared world with such a deft, personal touch. Janet Mason is a genius.”
C.A. Conrad, The Book of Frank

“I know I will always be attracted to the unknown as it does often verify what I am or what else I could be.”
Hollace M. Metzger

“کاش
قناری می فهمید زندگی پرواز نیست”
Mohammad Hossein Khosh Bayan

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