European History Quotes

Quotes tagged as "european-history" (showing 1-11 of 11)
Friedrich Nietzsche
“There have been two great narcotics in European civilisation: Christianity and alcohol.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

“There is of course a deep spiritual need which the pilgrimage seems to satisfy, particularly for those hardy enough to tackle the journey on foot.”
Edwin Mullins, The Pilgrimage to Santiago

Hank Bracker
“I was exhausted and had to rely on Herr Schreiner to help me and knew in my soul that God had sent him to my aid. As tired as I was, I couldn’t have handled my luggage alone. Finally another train did pull into the station but in stark contrast to the empty platform we were standing on, the train was completely full of people. Although he wasn’t that big of a man, Herr Schreiner pushed my suitcases up the two steps into the railway car, and I climbed up behind them. As the train left the station, he hung onto the two entrance handles right behind me and I pushed for space, trying to make enough room for him to get into the carriage. With every surge of the train I expected him to lose his grip but with what I am certain was superhuman strength, he hung on as the train picked up speed. Several of the people made snide remarks but I turned a deaf ear to this and pushed as hard as I could, so that he could also get in. With the help of another man pulling on his coat, Herr Schreiner finally managed to squeeze in far enough so that we could close the door behind him. Once safely on the train, someone from his school in Mannheim recognized him. Herr Schreiner had been a very popular, much admired school principal and seeing how tired and bedraggled we now looked, the passenger offered us his window seats and helped to make room so that we could store our suitcases in the luggage rack above our heads. The train didn’t make any more stops and continued east crossing the Rhine River Bridge, which miraculously was still there. I couldn’t believe that everything had come together as well as it had, and that I was on my way back to Überlingen and my children.”
Captain Hank Bracker

Adam Nevill
“Perhaps enlightenment, technology and secularism haven't cleared Europe of the oldest science of all - the occult.”
Adam Nevill, Banquet For the Damned

“The greater and better parts of Christendom would be very wrong, seeing themselves presently governed by princesses whose natural intelligence, seasoned by long experience of good and bad fortune both in wars and domestic matters, have put a great many kings to shame.”
Pierre de Rasnard

Hank Bracker
“I find it difficult to remember all of the details of our journey after leaving Mannheim. At the time I was depressed and extremely tired. The children must have felt the same way since they were just there. The unflappable joy they always demonstrated and the sparkle in their eyes was missing. An unspeakable sadness had settled in. Being children they were being denied the right to be happy, to be able to celebrate their youth and look forward to a promising future. Now they hardly ever complained or cried. They sometimes said that they were hungry and asked if we had food, but accepted the fact that we were all hungry most of the time. My only vivid recollection is that we were headed towards the Bodensee, or what is called Lake Constance, near the Swiss border. The only reason we were going there was that it seemed rural, and more distant from the advancing front and active war zone. Perhaps I felt that neutral Switzerland was close by and if need be we could appeal to someone’s compassion and escape. Of course this was only a fleeting thought and could never happen….”
Captain Hank Bracker

Hank Bracker
“Imagine if you can how I felt when I arrived in Strasbourg. I could still vividly remember the cruel treatment I had received in this same railroad station just a couple of months earlier. I tried not to do anything that would attract attention to myself and strove to be inconspicuous. There were still crowds of people trying to get home, but things seemed different.
From the Rosheim train station, it was a long, tiring walk back to Bischoffsheim, and as I walked I noticed that people were scurrying by and I just sensed that something terrible had happened. As I rounded the corner and started down the main street, I could see a crowd clustered around the gate to the Ortsgruppenleiter’s farmyard. It all looked very familiar since I had lived in the apartment across the street but nothing prepared me for what I was about to see. Heavens, what a terrible sight! I almost screamed but somehow managed to keep quiet and stifled any sounds that I normally would have made. There on the barn door was Herr Erdmann, crucified! He was still alive and twitching as he hung from some large rusty nails that had been driven into his flesh.”
Captain Hank Bracker

Hank Bracker
“Neville Chamberlain, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, honestly believed that he could reason with Adolf Hitler in good faith. Now, most history books find little else to say about Chamberlain and he is solely remembered for believing that he could pacify Herr Führer by signing the Munich Agreement of 1938. In doing this, he ceded to Germany the Sudetenland, a German-speaking part of Czechoslovakia, without having any real authority to do so. Three days later, French Prime Minister Édouard Daladier followed suit, thereby giving the “German Reich” a piece of Czechoslovakia, consisting of the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and parts of Silesia. In March of 1939, German troops rolled in and occupied the territory. Three other parts broke off from Czechoslovakia, with one becoming the Slovak Republic, another part being annexed by Hungary, and the third part, which was borderland, becoming a part of Poland. These all came together to become satellite states and allies of Nazi Germany.
On May 10, 1940, in a radio address to the 8th Pan American Scientific Congress, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared, “I am a pacifist. You, my fellow citizens of twenty-one American Republics, are pacifists too.” Roosevelt was referring to Canada and Latin America. The United States attempted to remain neutral and did not enter into the war until four days after Pearl Harbor was attacked by Japan. Roosevelt opposed the concept of war and made every attempt to find a peaceful solution to the hostilities in Europe. On December 11, 1941, after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, both Germany and Italy declared war on the United States.”
Captain Hank Bracker, "Seawater One...."

Stewart Stafford
“Brexit is the tip of the iceberg - there are so many endlessly complex permutations beneath the surface that nobody will see them all until Britain leaves the EU and maybe not even then.”
Stewart Stafford

Sarah Gristwood
“With Edward’s death imminent, questions of whether a woman could succeed were irrelevant. The only question was, which woman?”
Sarah Gristwood, Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth-Century Europe

Hank Bracker
“Pope Alexander VI issued a Papal bull authorizing the Treaty of Tordesillas on June 7, 1494. The treaty gave everything located beyond 370 leagues or exceeding 1,110 nautical miles west of Cape Verde to Spain for exploration, and everything east of this meridian went to Portugal.”
Captain Hank Bracker, The Exciting Story of Cuba