Stoic Quotes

Quotes tagged as "stoic" Showing 1-30 of 135
Marcus Aurelius
“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Seneca
“Until we have begun to go without them, we fail to realize how unnecessary many things are. We've been using them not because we needed them but because we had them.”
Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Epictetus
“Remember, it is not enough to be hit or insulted to be harmed, you must believe that you are being harmed. If someone succeeds in provoking you, realize that your mind is complicit in the provocation. Which is why it is essential that we not respond impulsively to impressions; take a moment before reacting, and you will find it easier to maintain control.”
Epictetus, The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness

Will Durant
“A nation is born stoic, and dies epicurean”
Will Durant

Fernando Pessoa
“At first I felt dizzy - not with the kind of dizziness that makes the body reel but the kind that's like a dead emptiness in the brain, an instinctive awareness of the void.”
Fernando Pessoa, The Education of the Stoic: The Only Manuscript of the Baron of Teive

Epicurus
“Never say that I have taken it, only that I have given it back.”
Epicurus

Seneca
“It is more civilized to make fun of life than to bewail it.”
Seneca, On the Shortness of Life

Marcus Aurelius
“Think of your many years of procrastination; how the gods have repeatedly granted you further periods of grace, of which you have taken no advantage. It is time now to realise the nature of the universe to which you belong, and of that controlling Power whose offspring you are; and to understand that your time has a limit set to it. Use it, then, to advance your enlightenment; or it will be gone, and never in your power again.”
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Seneca
“Nothing, to my way of thinking, is a better proof of a well ordered mind than a man’s ability to stop just where he is and pass some time in his own company.”
Seneca

Marcus Aurelius
“When people injure you, ask yourself what good or harm they thought would come of it. If you understand that, you'll feel sympathy rather than outrage or anger. Your sense of good and evil may be the same as theirs, or near it, in which case you have to excuse them. Or your sense of good and evil may differ from theirs. In which case they're misguided and deserve your compassion. Is that so hard?”
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Epictetus
“An ignorant person is inclined to blame others for his own misfortune. To blame oneself is proof of progress. But the wise man never has to blame another or himself.”
Epictetus, The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness

Epictetus
“If you want to make progress, put up with being perceived as ignorant or naive in worldly matters, don't aspire to a reputation for sagacity. If you do impress others as somebody, don't altogether believe it. You have to realize, it isn't easy to keep your will in agreement with nature, as well as externals. Caring about the one inevitably means you are going to shortchange the other.”
Epictetus, The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness

Epictetus
“Remember to act always as if you were at a symposium. When the food or drink comes around, reach out and take some politely; if it passes you by don't try pulling it back. And if it has not reached you yet, don't let your desire run ahead of you, be patient until your turn comes. Adopt a similar attitude with regard to children, wife, wealth and status, and in time, you will be entitled to dine with the gods. Go further and decline these goods even when they are on offer and you will have a share in the gods' power as well as their company. That is how Diogenes, Heraclitus and philosophers like them came to be called, and considered, divine.”
Epictetus, The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness

Criss Jami
“I've come to the point where I never feel the need to stop and evaluate whether or not I am happy. I'm just 'being', and without question, by default, it works.”
Criss Jami, Diotima, Battery, Electric Personality

Seneca
“I have learned to be a friend to myself Great improvement this indeed Such a one can never be said to be alone for know that he who is a friend to himself is a friend to all mankind”
Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“We love being mentally strong, but we hate situations that allow us to put our mental strength to good use.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Gillian Flynn
“I'd developed an inability to demonstrate much negative emotion at all. It was another thing that made me seem like a dick - my stomach could be all oiled eels, and you would get nothing from my face and less from my words. It was a constant problem: too much control or no control at all.”
Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl

Epictetus
“The first and most important field of philosophy is the application of principles such as “Do not lie.” Next come the proofs, such as why we should not lie. The third field supports and articulates the proofs, by asking, for example, “How does this prove it? What exactly is a proof, what is logical inference, what is contradiction, what is truth, what is falsehood?” Thus, the third field is necessary because of the second, and the second because of the first. The most important, though, the one that should occupy most of our time, is the first. But we do just the opposite. We are preoccupied with the third field and give that all our attention, passing the first by altogether. The result is that we lie – but have no difficulty proving why we shouldn’t.”
Epictetus, The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness

Seneca
“My advice is really this: what we hear the philosophers saying and what we find in their writings should be applied in our pursuit of the happy life. We should hunt out the helpful pieces of teaching, and the spirited and noble-minded sayings which are capable of immediate practical application—not far-fetched or archaic expressions or extravagant metaphors and figures of speech—and learn them so well that words become works. No one to my mind lets humanity down quite so much as those who study philosophy as if it were a sort of commercial skill and then proceed to live in a quite different manner from the way they tell other people to live.”
Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Gillian Flynn
“She released her grievances like handfuls of birdseed: They are there, and they are gone.”
Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl

Seneca
“Here is your great soul—the man who has given himself over to Fate; on the other hand, that man is a weakling and a degenerate who struggles and maligns the order of the universe and would rather reform the gods than reform himself.”
Seneca, Letters From A Stoic: Epistulae Morales AD Lucilium (Illustrated. Newly revised text. Includes Image Gallery + Audio): All Three Volumes

Marcus Aurelius
“It is quite possible to be a good man without anyone realizing it.”
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations: A New Translation

Seneca
“To expel hunger and thirst there is no necessity of sitting in a palace and submitting to the supercilious brow and contumelious favour of the rich and great there is no necessity of sailing upon the deep or of following the camp What nature wants is every where to be found and attainable without much difficulty whereas require the sweat of the brow for these we are obliged to dress anew j compelled to grow old in the field and driven to foreign mores A sufficiency is always at hand”
Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Marcus Aurelius
“And why should we feel anger at the world?

As if the world would notice.”
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations: A New Translation

“Forever seeking, forever moving forward. To strive, to struggle.”
Shonjuk Chakma

Ryan Holiday
“Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only they truly live. Not satisfied to merely keep good watch over their own days, they annex every age to their own. All the harvest of the past is added to their store. Only an ingrate would fail to see that these great architects of venerable thoughts were born for us and have designed a way of life for us.”
Ryan Holiday, The Daily Dad: 366 Meditations on Fatherhood, Love and Raising Great Kids

“Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only they truly live. Not satisfied to merely keep good watch over their own days, they annex every age to their own. All the harvest of the past is added to their store. Only an ingrate would fail to see that these great architects of venerable thoughts were born for us and have designed a way of life for us.”
Ryan Holiday Stephen Hanselman, The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living

Seneca
“It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waist a lot of it. Life is long enough, and a sufficient generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested. But when it is wasted in heedless luxury and spent on no good activity, we are forced at last by death's final constraint to realize that it has passed away before we know it was passing”
Seneca

Seneca
“I am acting on behalf of later generations. I am writing down a few things that may be of use to them.”
Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

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