Quotes About Allegory

Quotes tagged as "allegory" (showing 1-30 of 53)
Augustine of Hippo
“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”
Augustine of Hippo

Cormac McCarthy
“Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow. They smelled of moss in your hand. Polished and muscular and torsional. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where they lived all things were older than man and they hummed of mystery.”
Cormac McCarthy, The Road

William Shakespeare
“O, beware, my lord, of jealousy;
It is the green-ey'd monster, which doth mock
The meat it feeds on.”
William Shakespeare, Othello

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history – true or feigned– with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“A man inherited a field in which was an accumulation of old stone, part of an older hall. Of the old stone some had already been used in building the house in which he actually lived, not far from the old house of his fathers. Of the rest he took some and built a tower. But his friends coming perceived at once (without troubling to climb the steps) that these stones had formerly belonged to a more ancient building. So they pushed the tower over, with no little labour, and in order to look for hidden carvings and inscriptions, or to discover whence the man's distant forefathers had obtained their building material. Some suspecting a deposit of coal under the soil began to dig for it, and forgot even the stones. They all said: 'This tower is most interesting.' But they also said (after pushing it over): 'What a muddle it is in!' And even the man's own descendants, who might have been expected to consider what he had been about, were heard to murmur: 'He is such an odd fellow! Imagine using these old stones just to build a nonsensical tower! Why did not he restore the old house? he had no sense of proportion.' But from the top of that tower the man had been able to look out upon the sea.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, Beowulf and the Critics

Sarah MacLean
“What does Éloa mean?”

He narrowed his gaze, answered her literally. “It’s the name of an angel.”

Penelope tilted her head, thinking. “I’ve never heard of him.”

“You wouldn’t have.”

“Was he a fallen angel?”

“She was, yes.” He hesitated, not wanting to tell her the story, but unable to stop himself. “Lucifer tricked her into falling from heaven.”

“Tricked her how?”

He met her gaze. “She fell in love with him.”

Penelope’s eyes widened. “Did he love her?”

Like an addict loves his addiction. “The only way he knew how.”

She shook her head. “How could he trick her?”

“He never told her his name.”
Sarah MacLean, A Rogue by Any Other Name

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
“When I opened my eyes I saw nothing but the pool of nocturnal sky, for I was lying on my back with out-stretched arms, face to face with that hatchery of stars. Only half awake, still unaware that those depths were sky, having no roof between those depths and me, no branches to screen them, no root to cling to, I was seized with vertigo and felt myself as if flung forth and plunging downward like a diver.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Wind, Sand and Stars

Margaret Atwood
“I could end this with a moral,
as if this were a fable about animals,
though no fables are really about animals.”
Margaret Atwood, The Tent

Herman Melville
“All my means are sane, my motive and my object mad.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, The Whale

Vera Nazarian
“On this material plane, each living being is like a street lantern lamp with a dirty lampshade.

The inside flame burns evenly and is of the same quality as all the rest—hence all of us are equal in the absolute sense, the essence, in the quality of our energy.

However, some of the lamps are “turned down” and having less light in them, burn fainter, (the beings have a less defined individuality, are less in tune with the universal All which is the same as the Will)—hence all of us are unequal in a relative sense, some of us being more aware (human beings), and others being less aware (animal beings), with small wills and small flames.

The lampshades of all are stained with the clutter of the material reality or the physical world.

As a result, it is difficult for the light of each lamp to shine through to the outside and it is also difficult to see what is on the other side of the lampshade that represents the external world (a great thick muddy ocean of fog), and hence to “feel” a connection with the other lantern lamps (other beings).

The lampshade is the physical body immersed in the ocean of the material world, and the limiting host of senses that it comes with.

The dirt of the lampshade results from the cluttering bulk of life experience accumulated without a specific goal or purpose.

The dirtier the lampshade, the less connection each soul has to the rest of the universe—and this includes its sense of connection to other beings, its sense of dual presence in the material world and the metaphysical world, and the thin connection line to the wick of fuel or the flow of electricity that resides beyond the material plane and is the universal energy.

To remain “lit” each lantern lamp must tap into the universal Source of energy.

If the link is weak, depression and-or illness sets in.

If the link is strong, life persists.

This metaphor to me best illustrates the universe.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations...”
J.R.R. Tolkien

Roman Payne
“Ô, the wine of a woman
from heaven is sent,
more perfect than all
that a man can invent.

When she came to my bed and begged me with sighs
not to tempt her towards passion nor actions unwise,
I told her I’d spare her and kissed her closed eyes,
then unbraided her body of its clothing disguise.

While our bodies were nude bathed in candlelight fine
I devoured her mouth, tender lips divine;
and I drank through her thighs her feminine wine.

Ô, the wine of a woman
from heaven is sent,
more perfect than all
that a man can invent.”
Roman Payne

Roman Payne
“Ô, the wine of a woman from heaven is sent,
more perfect than all that a man can invent.”
Roman Payne, Europa: Limited Time Edition
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Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
“At this the duchess, laughing all the while, said: "Sancho Panza is right in all he has said, and will be right in all he shall say...”
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

C.S. Lewis
“The two things that came out clearly were the sense of reality in the background and the mythical value: the essence of myth being that it should have no taint of allegory to the maker and yet should suggest incipient allegories to the reader.
[C.S. Lewis writes to J.R.R. Tolkien on December 7, 1929]”
C.S. Lewis

Leah Wilson
“a thing may happen and be a total lie; another thing may not happen and be truer then the truth”
Leah Wilson, The Girl Who Was on Fire: Your Favorite Authors on Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games Trilogy

Dennis Lehane
“Twelve dead?” I said. “Jesus.”
Dennis Lehane, A Drink Before the War

Margaret Atwood
“I follow suit, said the lion,
vacating his coat of arms
and movie logos; and the eagle said,
Get me off this flag.”
Margaret Atwood, The Tent

C.S. Lewis
“Nowhere in Chaucer do we find what can be called a radically allegorical poem.”
C.S. Lewis

William Golding
“I was the only boy in our school what had asthma," said the fat boy with a touch of pride. "And I've been wearing specs since I was three.”
William Golding, Barron's Book Notes: Lord of the Flies

Chandel L. White
“Long before there was ever a King James Version of our Bible, there was a gospel truth...and long before doctrines and denominations, the preeminence of the gospel was already ripe to harvest. Before man had ever thought about creating symbols to represent spiritual things...there was a gospel.”
Chandel L. White, Romans to Jude - Precise Christian Scripture Revealed

Christina Baker Kline
“You can live for a long time inside the shell you were born in. But one day it'll become too small."
"Then what?" I ask.
"Well, then you'll have to find a larger shell to live in."
I consider this for a moment. "What if it's too small but you still want to live there?"
She sighs. "Gracious, child, what a question. I suppose you'll either have to be brave and find a new home or you'll have to live inside a broken shell.”
Christina Baker Kline, A Piece of the World

Flannery O'Connor
“In any case, you can't have effective allegory in times when people are swept this way and that by momentary convictions, because everyone will read it differently. You can't indicate moral values when morality changes with what is being done, because there is no accepted basis of judgment. And you cannot show the operation of grace when grace is cut off from nature or when the very possibility of grace is denied, because no one will have the least idea of what you are about.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Baruch Spinoza
“If Scripture were to describe the downfall of an empire in the style adopted by political historians, the common people would not be stirred.”
Baruch Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise

“I’m Temple Claybourne, an upright, warm-blooded hairy mammal, Caucasian, skidding into my fourth decade of existence, the progeny of meat-eating Anglo-Saxon tribal chieftains, left-handed, flat of foot, with low cholesterol and a predictably receding hairline, carrying a zero debt load, a nervous driver, nervous in crowds, nervous around women, hungry with curiosity, a collector of comforting, unnecessary things.”
Loyd Boldman, The Gravity Addict

Dan Wells
“- Szóval képzeld el, hogy a városban mindenki más elmehet a piacra, megveheti, amit akar, és megsütheti a kenyerét... csak úgy, hipp-hopp. Bármikor, bármennyi kenyeret. De te nem. Neked be kell vetned a saját meződet, és meg kell növesztened a saját búzádat, hogy aztán betakaríthasd, és feldolgozhasd. Meg kell építened a saját sütődet kőből vagy agyagból vagy mit tudom én, miből építették annak idején, és fel kell nevelned a saját fáidat, hogy legyen mit tűzifává vágnod, és még a saját kovászodat is el kell készítened egy... a franc tudja, miből...
- Éhen halnánk - vágott közbe Regina.
- Így van. Az egész életedet két vekni kenyér, mindössze két darab kenyér elkészítésével töltenéd, és azok jelentenének neked mindent.”
Dan Wells, Over Your Dead Body

John Bunyan
“On the Day of Judgment , life and death are not determined by the world but by God's wisdom and law”
John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress

Ernest Hemingway
“Every novel which is truly written contributes to the total of knowledge which is there at the disposal of the next writer who comes, but the next writer must pay, always, a certain nominal percentage in experience to be able to understand and assimilate what is available as his birthright and what he must, in turn, take his departure from. If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of an ice-berg is due to only one-eighth of it being above water. A writer who omits things because he does not know them only makes hollow places in his writing. A writer who appreciates the seriousness of writing so little that he is anxious to make people see he is formally educated, cultured or well-bred is merely a popinjay. And this too remember; a serious writer is not to be confounded with a solemn writer. A serious writer may be a hawk or a buzzard or even a popinjay, but a solemn writer is always a bloody owl.”
Ernest Hemingway, Death in the Afternoon

Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
“The reason creatures wanted to use language instead of mental telepathy was that they found out they could get so much more done with language. Language made them so much more active. Mental telepathy, with everybody constantly telling everybody everything, produced a sort of generalized indifference to all information. But language, with its slow, narrow meanings, made it possible to think about one thing at a time -- to start thinking in terms of projects.”
Kurt Vonnegut Jr., God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater

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