Maps Quotes

Quotes tagged as "maps" Showing 1-30 of 112
Cormac McCarthy
“Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow. They smelled of moss in your hand. Polished and muscular and torsional. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where they lived all things were older than man and they hummed of mystery.”
Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Terry Pratchett
“You can't map a sense of humor. Anyway, what is a fantasy map but a space beyond which There Be Dragons? On the Discworld we know that There Be Dragons Everywhere. They might not all have scales and forked tongues, but they Be Here all right, grinning and jostling and trying to sell you souvenirs. ”
Terry Pratchett, The Color of Magic

Gilles Deleuze
“Writing has nothing to do with meaning. It has to do with landsurveying and cartography, including the mapping of countries yet to come.”
Gilles Deleuze

Roseanne Barr
“Men read maps better than women because only men can understand the concept of an inch equaling a hundred miles.”
Roseanne Barr

Ilona Andrews
“He lunged for the maps. I grabbed the chair and hit him with it. He went down. I hit him again to make sure he stayed that way, stepped over him, and picked up the maps.
"I win.”
Ilona Andrews, Magic Burns

Alexander McCall Smith
“Regular maps have few surprises: their contour lines reveal where the Andes are, and are reasonably clear. More precious, though, are the unpublished maps we make ourselves, of our city, our place, our daily world, our life; those maps of our private world we use every day; here I was happy, in that place I left my coat behind after a party, that is where I met my love; I cried there once, I was heartsore; but felt better round the corner once I saw the hills of Fife across the Forth, things of that sort, our personal memories, that make the private tapestry of our lives.”
Alexander McCall Smith, Love Over Scotland

Rebecca Solnit
“A labyrinth is a symbolic journey . . . but it is a map we can really walk on, blurring the difference between map and world.”
Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking

Michael Ondaatje
“I believe in such cartography – to be marked by nature, not just label ourselves on a map like the names of rich men and women on buildings. We are communal histories, communal books. ... All I desired was to walk upon such an earth that had no maps.”
Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient

Gerald Durrell
“They were maps that lived, maps that one could study, frown over, and add to; maps, in short, that really meant something.”
Gerald Durrell, My Family and Other Animals
tags: maps

Reif Larsen
“A map does not just chart, it unlocks and formulates meaning; it forms bridges between here and there, between disparate ideas that we did not know were previously connected.”
Reif Larsen, The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet

Zeyn Joukhadar
“The most important places on a map are the places we haven't been yet”
Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar, The Map of Salt and Stars

Jonathan Safran Foer
“A map such as that one is worth many hundreds, and as luck will have it, thousands of dollars. But more than this, it is a remembrance of that time before our planet was so small. When this map was made, I thought, you could live without knowing where you were not living.”
Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated

Robert Harbison
“To put a city in a book, to put the world on one sheet of paper -- maps are the most condensed humanized spaces of all...They make the landscape fit indoors, make us masters of sights we can't see and spaces we can't cover.”
Robert Harbison, Eccentric Spaces

Gideon Defoe
“That explains a lot,' he said. 'I suppose it's also why we've never glimpsed that giant compass in the corner of the Atlantic. I have to say, I'm a little disappointed.”
Gideon Defoe, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists

Terry Pratchett
“Map-making had never been a precise art on the Discworld. People tended to start off with good intentions and then get so carried away with the spouting whales, monsters, waves and other twiddly bits of cartographic furniture that the often forgot to put the boring mountains and rivers in at all.”
Terry Pratchett, Moving Pictures
tags: maps

Abdulrazak Gurnah
“I speak to maps. And sometimes they something back to me. This is not as strange as it sounds, nor is it an unheard of thing. Before maps, the world was limitless. It was maps that gave it shape and made it seem like territory, like something that could be possessed, not just laid waste and plundered. Maps made places on the edges of the imagination seem graspable and placable.”
Abdulrazak Gurnah, By the Sea

Patrick White
“The map? I will first make it.”
Patrick White, Voss

“Maps codify the miracle of existence.”
Nicholas Crane, Mercator: The Man Who Mapped the Planet

Shawn Klomparens
“He comes down next to me, and when I hold out my hand, he takes it. Our fingers lace together. And in that feeling, that perfect feeling of our hands and fingers pressed together, I want to tell him everything. I want to tell him about Josh, and his sister, Emily. I want to tell him about tall, crazy Gert. I want to tell him about bridges and funerals, and most of all, maps. More than anything else, I want to tell him about myself. I want to tell him that I know what things look like from above now. There's so much I want to tell him, because I know he'll understand.”
Shawn Klomparens, Jessica Z.

Debbie Lee Wesselmann
“Through our maps, we willingly become a part of their boundaries. If our home is included, we feel pride, perhaps familiarity, but always a sense that this is ours. If it is not, we accept our roles as outsiders, though we may be of the same mind and culture. In this way, maps can be dangerous and powerful tools.”
Debbie Lee Wesselmann, Trutor & The Balloonist

Terry Pratchett
“It was a shack, somewhere out on the outskirts of the Plains town of Scrote. Scrote had a lot of outskirts, spread so widely-a busted cart here, a dead dog there-that often people went through it without even knowing it was there, and really it only appeared on the maps because cartographers get embarrassed about big empty spaces.”
Terry Pratchett

Jenn Bennett
“For our one-month anniversary, he made me a picture map.

A map of us.

It’s years in the making, and it’s messy and convoluted, some of it even tragic. But I wouldn’t change the route, because we walked it together, even when we were apart. And the best part about it is that it’s unfinished.

Uncertainty isn’t always a bad thing. Sometimes it can even be filled with extraordinary potential.”
Jenn Bennett, Starry Eyes

Christophe Galfard
“Even today, more than eighty years after Oort's bold guess, we still don't have a clue what this dark matter is made of. We know it exists. We know where it is. We have maps of its presence within and around galaxies throughout the universe. We even have stringent constraints on what it is not, but we have no clue what it is. And yes, its presence is overwhelming: for every one kilogram of ordinary matter made out of neutrons and protons and electrons, there are five kilograms of dark matter, made out of who-knows-what.”
Christophe Galfard, The Universe in Your Hand: A Journey Through Space, Time, and Beyond

Beryl Markham
“It seemed that the printers of the African maps had a slightly malicious habit of including, in large letters, the names of towns, junctions, and villages which, while most of them did exist in fact, as a group of thatched huts may exist or a water hole, they were usually so inconsequential as completely to escape discovery from the cockpit.”
Beryl Markham, West with the Night

Beryl Markham
“It was ... disconcerting to examine your charts before a proposed flight only to find that in many cases the bulk of the terrain over which you had to fly was bluntly marked: 'UNSURVEYED.'

It was as if the mapmakers had said, 'We are aware that between this spot and that one, there are several hundred thousands of acres, but until you make a forced landing there, we won't know whether it is mud, desert, or jungle -- and the chances are we won't know then!”
Beryl Markham, West with the Night

Ken Jennings
“Columbus’s fateful voyage was inspired by his study of a map by Paolo Toscanelli. But there was also the 1854 cholera outbreak in London, which killed hundreds of people until a physician, John Snow, drew a map demonstrating that a single contaminated water pump was the source of the illness, thereby founding the science of epidemiology. There was the 1944 invasion at Normandy, which succeeded only because of the unheralded contribution of mapmakers who had stolen across the English Channel by night for months before D-Day and mapped the French beaches.* Even the moon landing was a product of mapping. In 1961, the United States Geological Survey founded a Branch of Astrogeology, which spent a decade painstakingly assembling moon maps to plan the Apollo missions. The Apollo 11 crew pored over pouches of those maps as their capsule approached the lunar surface, much as Columbus did during his voyage. It seems that the greatest achievements in human history have all been made possible by the science of cartography.”
Ken Jennings, Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks

Thomm Quackenbush
“For the canny traveler, the map is dotted with tourist traps that were once something sincere, something worthy of reverence that gave way to branded merchandise. We follow the billboards that are as accurate as those guiding us to the Corn Palace or the World’s Largest Ball of Twine, kick at the dirt a bit, watch an overinflated PowerPoint or squint at a dusty artifact, peek at the gift shop, and go home with less money but nothing in value gained. These sites are mental stamps that one was in a place where something had once mattered, but the veil between Then and Now is thick and impermeable.”
Thomm Quackenbush, Holidays with Bigfoot

“In an important sense, therefore, Benjamin’s biography describes the construction of a map not meant for the eye.”
Brian Elliott, Benjamin For Architects

Huw Lewis-Jones
“It's easy to forget that old maps were once statements of the very latest in thinking: new visions brimming with the potential and power of up-to-date knowledge. The unknowns in such maps were warnings, certainly, but also became advertisements. When made visible on the chart they invited perilous new journeys as much as cautioned against them.”
Huw Lewis-Jones, The Writer's Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands
tags: maps

Kris Franken
“Rip up the maps. Burn them. Let them fly. Give thanks for all the well-meaning advice you've been given. Start afresh. Go against what you've been taught if you need to. It may feel uncomfortable, but that's only because it's new.”
Kris Franken, The Call of Intuition: How to Recognize & Honor Your Intuition, Instinct & Insight

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