Meet the Authors of June's Popular Queer Young Adult Fiction

Posted by Sharon on June 1, 2020
If you like books about queer kids falling in love and having adventures, you're in for quite the treat this month. June brings a great assortment of highly anticipated contemporary young adult books in that vein, just in time for Pride Month.

To help you find the titles you'll want to add to your Want to Read shelf, we reached out to the authors whose books are about to capture a lot of your reading time. We asked each YA writer to tell us about their new novel, the books they'd recommend, and their favorite romantic trope. Happy reading!
 


Leah Johnson, author of You Should See Me in a Crown 

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Goodreads: Describe your new book for us in a few sentences.

Leah Johnson: You Should See Me in a Crown is about a girl named Liz Lighty, whose number one goal is to get out of her small (and small-minded) Midwestern hometown and go to her dream school. But her plans are derailed when she doesn't land the financial aid she was expecting, and has to run for prom queen to secure the scholarship attached to winning queen. As if that wasn't tough enough, along the way, Liz also starts to fall for the competition—a new girl named Mack. 

You Should See Me in a Crown is a self-love anthem for queer black girls everywhere.

GR: Why did you want to tell this particular story?
 
LJ: My goal, always, is for black girls to come to my books and walk away knowing that they are loved. That they deserve beautiful things—that they are their own most beautiful thing.

Liz begins this story constantly attempting to make herself smaller and more palatable to better fit in—something I understood intimately—so I figured: What better way to remind girls that they're worthy of every bit of pomp and circumstance than to make gawky, anxious, magnificent Liz Lighty a literal queen? 
 
GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?
 
LJ: The most challenging part of writing this book wasn't in the writing at all (though that was also one of the toughest things I've ever done). When I began working on Crown, I wasn’t out—not even to myself. So in writing Liz's journey to self-ownership and shedding the shame that she's been taught about her queerness, I was doing that work right alongside her.

I had to learn to take up space, to love all the parts of myself that I was afraid to so much as name. Being given the space to publish this book has been the single greatest step in living the type of life I never thought I'd be able to have.
 
GR: What do you consider to be a classic, must-read queer young adult book, and who are the new voices in the genre that you're excited about?
 
LJ: Oh my goodness, this question is impossible! There are so many iconic, canonical texts in queer YA that I don't let my students leave my creative writing class without reading. But I'd have to say that above all Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz is a master class in what this genre can be. I will never stop singing that book's praises.

And as far as new voices are concerned, my debut class is full of incredible, brilliant queer writers that I'm learning from everyday. Adiba Jaigirdar and Kelly Quindlen in particular wrote two of my favorite and most anticipated queer YA novels so far this year. 
 
GR: What are the queer YA novels that you recommend to your friends?
 
LJ: My favorite question of all time! Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire SáenzThey Both Die at the End by Adam SilveraSimon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky AlbertalliThe Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily DanforthBoy Meets Boy by David Levithan, and Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram to name just a few. 
 
GR: What is your favorite romantic trope, and why? (Or, alternatively, describe your dream real-life meet-cute.)
 
LJ: Give me fake-dating-but-oops-I-actually-love-you or give me death!
 

Leah Johnson's You Should See Me in a Crown will be available in the U.S. on June 2.



Shaun David Hutchinson, author of The State of Us

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Goodreads: Describe your new book for us in a few sentences.

Shaun David Hutchinson: Dre is the son of the Democratic candidate for President of the United States. Dean is the son of the Republican candidate. They're thrown together during a lockdown at the first presidential debate, where they discover they have more in common than either of them realized. As a friendship (and more) begins to develop, a shady third-party candidate tries to use their burgeoning relationship to his advantage.

GR: Why did you want to tell this particular story?

SDH: I've always loved politics, and the 2016 election left me feeling raw and a bit hollowed out. I had to confront a lot of friends and family who voted for Trump, and many of those confrontations cost me the friendships. So I wanted to write a story that looks at the necessity of challenging each other's beliefs but in a way that allows both parties to grow.

And, truthfully, I also really wanted to write a sweet romance. Many of my books are a bit heavier, and writing Dean and Dre's story lightened my soul a little.

GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

SDH: The most challenging part of writing The State of Us was portraying the ideological divide between Dean and Dre, and between Dean's and Dre's parents, without validating the aspects that I find abhorrent. Take a topic like gay conversion therapy. I will never, ever entertain the idea that conversion therapy is valid. Period. Therefore, I had to find a way to acknowledge that points of view I disagree with exist and that there are arguments that support those points of view without giving credence to them.

At the end of the day, I didn't want to spend the book making judgments about specific topics. What I wanted to do was create an atmosphere where readers will feel comfortable interrogating their own beliefs and the beliefs of their friends and family. Because change happens when we take the time to question ourselves and when we take the time to educate others. 

GR: What do you consider to be a classic, must-read queer young adult book, and who are the new voices in the genre that you're excited about?

SDH: I think How to Be Remy Cameron by Julian Winters encapsulates everything that is wonderful about queer YA. I wish I'd had Julian's books to read when I was a teen, and I'm glad that current and future teens do.

As for new voices, there are so many! K. Ancrum isn't exactly new, but she deserves so much more attention than she's getting. The Weight of the Stars is a magnificently beautiful book about barreling through life without a safety net. I'm also dying to read Jake in the Box by Ryan Douglass. I heard him read a chapter from it last year and I was hooked. Adam SassSurrender Your Sons is brutal and beautiful. Then there's Aiden Thomas, who wrote Cemetery BoysI'm halfway through it now and it's magicalThere are, honestly, more amazing books coming out than I can keep up with. It's an embarrassment of riches.  

GR: What are the queer YA novels that you recommend to your friends? 

SDH: I'm a sucker for science fiction, so Willful Machines by Tim Floreen is always on my list to recommend. Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib KhorramWhat If It's Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam SilveraGone, Gone, Gone by Hannah MoskowitzDark and Deepest Red by Anna-Marie McLemore. And, though it's technically not YA, The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune blew me away this year. It's got a YA sensibility, I feel, and I've been putting it into the hands of everyone I talk to.

GR: What is your favorite romantic trope, and why? (Or, alternatively, describe your dream real-life meet-cute.)

SDH: My favorite romantic trope is definitely enemies to lovers. I love being on the sidelines shouting, "You're perfect for each other! Stop bickering and you'll see how much you have in common!" It feels so relatable to me. And that moment when it clicks—when they look at each other and realize they don't actually hate each other, that they actually feel the opposite—it's literary heroin for me.
 

Shaun David Hutchinson's The State of Us will be available in the U.S. on June 2.



Lucas Rocha, author of Where We Go from Here

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Goodreads: Describe your new book for us in a few sentences.

Lucas Rocha: Where We Go from Here is a story about love, friendship, and stigma regarding HIV-positive people. It is set in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and follows the lives of three main characters: Ian, Victor, and Henrique. Ian just received the news that he is now HIV-positive, and his world understandably turns upside down. At the clinic where he gets tested, he meets Victor, who's there for the same reason after Henrique, a guy that he may like more than he is willing to admit, discloses his own positive status. Victor tests negative, but chats with Ian, offering to connect Ian and Henrique for mutual support. Then, we follow the lives of these three Brazilian guys, their families, friends, hopes, and dreams.

GR: Why did you want to tell this particular story?
 
LR: I had the initial spark to write Where We Go from Here after I read a medical article that asked for opinions on HIV and HIV-positive people in the 21st century. In the interviews, I saw a lot of misconceptions and prejudice against HIV-positive people, things that I'd thought were behind us, but which are still very much alive.

So, the first thing I did when I decided to write about this subject was to search for YA novels that portrayed discussions about HIV in a way that could be hopeful for the future, but I did not find many of them to feel like there were enough stories like this in the world.

I wanted to tell a story about people who live with HIV or have relationships with HIV-positive people in a way that was not stigmatized. I wanted to tell stories about people—complex people with hopes, dreams, and desires—and write about the virus not as a monster that turns your life into misery, but as a chronic condition that can be treated. I wanted to show people the possibility of the life after a positive diagnosis as a fulfilling one, full of beauty and color.
 
GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?
 
LR: The research was my main concern. When dealing with a subject such as HIV that can be sensitive to a lot of people, I had to be extra careful to deliver the proper information and to not spread misconceptions, improper terminology, and/or false truths. I went to treatment centers and talked a lot with infectologists and patients to understand the different points of view they had of the virus and of how it can affect one's life.

I also had to do a lot of rewriting: After my agent read the book, after my sensitivity and beta readers read it, alongside my Brazilian editor, and then with my translator and my U.S. editor. It was a collective work that I am very proud of.
 
GR: What do you consider to be a classic, must-read queer young adult book, and who are the new voices in the genre that you're excited about?
 
LR: I was a late reader of queer novels, so my understanding of classics might be lightly biased.

But there were two queer YA books that resonated with me from the very first page: Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz. These two books changed my perspective in regard to seeing myself in narratives, because all I had read before were novels with straight characters. They showed me that it was possible to be a protagonist and not only a supporting character. Because of these novels, I was able to understand that my narrative as a person is also valid, and that my voice must be heard.
 
As of right now, I have a whole list of favorites! It makes me utterly happy to have a list of queer authors to suggest, and not just two. My favorites include Vitor Martins—another translated Brazilian debut, whose book, Here the Whole Time, is going to be released on November 10, 2020—and anything by Abdi Nazemian, Shaun David Hutchinson, Adam Silvera, Alice Oseman, and Leah Johnson.
 
GR: What are the queer YA novels that you recommend to your friends?
 
LR: Here the Whole Time by Vitor Martins: a sweet queer novel about a fat boy who must share his bedroom with his lifelong crush for 15 days. It is also a Brazilian novel and one of my favorites because it tackles themes like fatphobia, body image, and overall insecurities of growing up being fat and gay with a lot of humor and heartwarming moments.
 
Like a Love Story by Abdi Nazemian: This is one of the most beautiful novels I've read in my life. It talks about the power of community for queer people and wonderfully portrays the mess that is being afraid of coming out. It's also a tribute to Madonna, to pop music in general, and, especially, to love. Most important, it's set in New York during the AIDs crisis, and it shows us how the young queer people dealt with this new and unknown world. It is just an incredible book.
 
GR: What is your favorite romantic trope, and why? (Or, alternatively, describe your dream real-life meet-cute.)
 
LR: I'm a big fan of the stuck together trope—more so if it's done alongside enemies to lovers—because it is both uncomfortable to watch the characters freak out while trying to find a way out of a difficult situation and the perfect scenario for them to work out their differences and start having real conversations. I love when the characters express their feelings in a truthful way to sort out their problems and realize that they have a lot more in common than they initially thought, and that they are meant to be together until the end of times—c'mon, let me dream a little bit!
 

Lucas Rocha's Where We Go from Here will be available in the U.S. on June 2.



Ciara Smyth, author of The Falling in Love Montage

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Goodreads: Describe your new book for us in a few sentences.
 
Ciara SmythThe Falling in Love Montage is about Saoirse, a girl who does not believe that relationships last. She doesn't see the point because someone is going to get hurt when it ends. Enter Ruby: She argues that if they know when the relationship will end at the beginning, then no one can get hurt. Swayed by Ruby's general hotness, Saoirse agrees to a time-limited relationship that includes only the fun stuff you see in the falling-in-love montages of Ruby's beloved rom-coms. 
 
Then as the author I rub my hands together and do an evil laugh because things are not going to go to plan for them. 
 
GR: Why did you want to tell this particular story?
 
CS: I have watched one million rom-coms and I love them deeply, but they are mostly very heterosexual; the lesbian-focused films I grew up with tended to be quite serious and often bleak. For a long time as well, stories have centered around coming out, and that has been and continues to be important, but I really wanted to read and watch what happens after that story.

It was important to me to show a young Irish lesbian who is comfortable with her sexuality and is dealing with other issues and getting into mischief like everyone else, because that's what I would have wished for myself. 
 
GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?
 
CS: I think every part is challenging when you're doing it. And then when you're on to the next phase you think longingly of the last one.

But I think getting that first edit letter was a challenge, even though I was lucky to have two wonderful editors who I felt very in sync with, but it can be quite overwhelming. I felt like I'd knitted a scarf and then I had to somehow go back and fix the problems without unraveling the whole thing. Except that scarf also represents your heart, soul, and career. It's an important scarf. I've just been through that phase on my second book and I can tell you that feeling doesn't go away. 
 
GR: What do you consider to be a classic, must-read queer young adult book, and who are the new voices in the genre that you're excited about?
 
CS: Even though it's only eight years old, I think The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a classic and one everyone should read. It's beautiful and heartbreaking and one of my all-time favorites.
 
This year there are so many queer YA debuts coming out that it is impossible to mention everyone I'm excited about, but for fantasy readers I would recommend Kat Dunn (Dangerous Remedy) and Helen Corcoran (Queen of Coin and Whispers), and for those looking for more rom-com fun, look out for Kelly Quindlen (Late to the Party) and Leah Johnson (You Should See Me in a Crown).
 
GR: What are the queer YA novels that you recommend to your friends?
 
CSAmy Spalding's The Summer of Jordi Perez is one that I really love, and it inspired me when I was writing The Falling in Love Montage. I found it so uplifting and refreshing, and I wanted to write something that gave readers the same feelings. Another recent favorite of mine is Perfectly Preventable Deaths by Deirdre Sullivan, which is lyrical and witchy. Deirdre has a unique style and point of view in YA. 
 
GR: What is your favorite romantic trope, and why? (Or, alternatively, describe your dream real-life meet-cute.)
 
CS: Kristen Stewart will start a production company. She will read my book because she heard that it's funny and sweet and also name-checks her. She falls in love with it and absolutely must produce it! Of course she wants it to be authentic, so she makes sure it's filmed in Ireland and invites me to the set to watch filming and serve as a script consultant. I'm super excited and I can't wait to meet her, but then I realize she's butchered my book! I think she's a Hollywood hack. She thinks I'm a demanding artiste. We bicker constantly over the details.

Then one night over yet another rewrite, the lights go out. But we have to stay and work on the big scene being filmed tomorrow, so we light some candles and get to work. Somehow in the candlelight, haggling over what she considers gratuitous use of Irish slang, she realizes she loves me and I love her. And yes, this is not the first time I've thought about this. 
 

Ciara Smyth's The Falling in Love Montage will be available in the U.S. on June 9.



Lyla Lee, author of I'll Be the One 

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Lyla LeeI'll Be the One is about a bisexual Korean American teen who enters a Korean pop music competition in order to become one of the world's first plus-size K-pop stars. On a structural level, it's a fun and dramatic competition story with high stakes and exciting twists that keep the reader guessing who will make it to the next round. But the story also has a sweet, fun romance between Skye and the love interest, Henry. There are also lots of important moments of friendship, humor, and self-love sprinkled throughout the book.

GR: Why did you want to tell this particular story?

LL: I'll Be the One is ultimately the book I wrote for teen me and current teens who might have experiences similar to my own.

Although I'm not plus-size nor a K-pop star, a lot of what Skye experiences in the book are direct mirrors of things I experienced in real life. Dance and music were my first artistic loves, and the very first page where Skye talks about how she was fat-shamed in ballet class was based on my own experience of being fat-shamed in ballet when I was three.

In real life, I let the haters get to me and quit. I spent most of my teen years and beyond being so unhealthy to meet everyone's expectations. It wasn't until I was in my mid-20s that I started feeling OK with myself, and I poured my own journey of finding self-love and confidence into I'll Be the One so teen readers today could take the shortcut. A book like this would have been life-changing for teen me, and I hope it encourages teens today to love themselves for who they are.

GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

LL: Writing the first draft of this story was the most challenging part for me. When I was writing this book, I was coming from a place of a lot of self-doubt and negativity because two of my other YA novels had already been rejected by publishers and I'd had countless other rejections under my belt in the 10 years I sought out publication. 

I'll Be the One is also a very personal story, so there was a part of me that thought no one would want to read this kind of story as well. It took all my inner strength to finish writing this book.

GR: What do you consider to be a classic, must-read queer young adult book, and who are the new voices in the genre that you're excited about?

LL: I think any of Adam Silvera's books would be classic, must-read queer YA books. Reading his books (among others) gave me the bravery I needed to speak my truth and write about my own queer POC experiences.

Some new queer YA voices I'm excited about are Adiba Jaigirdar, Francesca Flores, Aiden Thomas, Leah Johnson, and Mason Deaver.

GR: What are the queer YA novels that you recommend to your friends?

LL: Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn BowmanWhat If It's Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam SilveraWhen the Moon Was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemoreAsh by Malinda LoHow to Be Remy Cameron by Julian Winters.

GR: What is your favorite romantic trope, and why? (Or, alternatively, describe your dream real-life meet-cute.)

LL: I really love friends to lovers. Maybe it's because this is the type of romance I have the most experience with, or because I always found the idea of friendship growing into something more to be incredibly sweet, but I always appreciate friends-to-lovers romances. It's a trope I also included in my own book. :)
 

Lyla Lee's I'll Be the One will be available in the U.S. on June 16.

 
 
Don't forget to add these titles to your Want to Read shelf, and tell us which books you're most excited about in the comments below.

Check out more recent articles, including:
June's Most Anticipated Young Adult Books
42 New Books to Read this Pride Month
Interview: The Lady Janies Tackle the American Wild West

Comments Showing 1-38 of 38 (38 new)

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message 1: by nat (new)

nat GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

SDH: The most challenging part of writing The State of Us was portraying the ideological divide between Dean and Dre, and between Dean's and Dre's parents, without validating the aspects that I find abhorrent.


as if he actually accomplished that


message 2: by Alaina (new)

Alaina Lisanti Most of these look cute (especially The Falling in Love Montage and You Should See Me in a Crown) but definitely count me out on "The State of Us". Hard pass, especially in a time with so much racism in our country.


message 3: by Aditi (new)

Aditi faith ✨ wrote: "GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

SDH: The most challenging part of writing The State of Us was portraying the ideological divide between Dean and Dre, and between Dea..."

oh damn 🤣 i was looking forward to it- gives me RW&RB vibes- but what do you think?


message 4: by nat (new)

nat Aditi wrote: "faith ✨ wrote: "GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

SDH: The most challenging part of writing The State of Us was portraying the ideological divide between Dean and Dre,..."


will dm you on hangouts about it 👀


message 5: by Aditi (new)

Aditi faith ✨ wrote: "Aditi wrote: "faith ✨ wrote: "GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

looking forward to it ;)


message 6: by David (new)

David Aditi wrote: "faith ✨ wrote: "GR: What was the most challenging aspect of writing your book?

SDH: The most challenging part of writing The State of Us was portraying the ideological divide between Dean and Dre,..."


I'm about 1/5 of the way through The State of Us and premise aside, I do get some RW&RB vibes. The first key plot point is the boys being thrown into a room together during a false alarm and are forced to bond. I'm curious whether that's just a common enemies to lovers romcom trope or whether it's just surprisingly similar.


message 7: by Via ⚡️ (new)

Via ⚡️ The State of Us is literally just Red, White and Royal Blue lol


message 8: by Aditi (new)

Aditi David- I've heard that its portrayal of relationships with different political beliefsvis not good at all and I definitely won't be reading this book. you might want to check Jen's review to see what you think. None of my friends think it's like RW&RB at all :(


message 9: by isa 💕 (new)

isa 💕 Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?


message 10: by Wade (last edited Jun 10, 2020 12:14PM) (new)

Wade baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"

i understand what you're saying, but a lot of us reclaimed that word a long time ago and it's kind of 50/50 in the community now on whether it's a slur or simply an umbrella term. i'm guessing the article was written by someone who has reclaimed and identifies with that term :)


message 11: by Madriyatou (new)

Madriyatou yuo


message 12: by Rika (new)

Rika Wow. The people interviewed here are seriously disgusting. First off all, "queer" is a slur and just because some LGBT use that term doesn't mean every ally just gets to throw it around. Secondly, the divisiveness of ideological nature of these author is disgustingly obvious. As an LGBT person, these people don't speak for me and I'm grossed out by them profiting off of our existence.


message 13: by Aditi (new)

Aditi most LGBTQ+ have reclaimed it! I don't take it as a slur anymore but I understand where you are coming from.


message 14: by Ryan (last edited Jun 10, 2020 09:09PM) (new)

Ryan Rika wrote: "Wow. The people interviewed here are seriously disgusting. First off all, "queer" is a slur and just because some LGBT use that term doesn't mean every ally just gets to throw it around. Secondly, ..."

I really don't see how using "queer" is a bad thing. Honestly, compared to some others out there, it isn't too bad. Then again, I'm pretty indifferent to slurs of the kind these days, so I don't care much in general. I might be a homosexual, but I don't really see a point of making a deal out of being called a queer.


Kate (Feathered Turtle Press) baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"

Agreed. If someone wants to use it for themselves or in their own body of work, it's one thing. It's rude and ignorant at best to claim it for the whole community on public/sponsored post like this, especially when it's a slur to so many people.


message 16: by Borders Are Global Apartheid (last edited Jun 14, 2020 08:15AM) (new)

Borders Are Global Apartheid Argh, I'm glad someone enjoys this stuff, but where's the queer fiction fad for *adults*? Also, here's my SFF bias, but I really don't get the appeal of all the real-life settings. Oh, school, how thrilling. Getting food at a cafe, people arguing over text. Yawn. At least put the "young adults" in space and have them shoot aliens in between shooting each other DMs.

Edit: scratch that, there are some sci-fi books mentioned by some authors. All look to be... as off-putting to me as other YA.


message 17: by nat (new)

nat Rika wrote: "Wow. The people interviewed here are seriously disgusting. First off all, "queer" is a slur and just because some LGBT use that term doesn't mean every ally just gets to throw it around. Secondly, ..."

100% sure all of these authors are queer though lmao (not sure about Lucas Rocha, don't know who they are)


message 18: by Ellery (new)

Ellery Brownlee baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"

I understand where you are coming from. This used to be a derogatory term directed at the LGBTQ+ community, but they have reclaimed it. As someone who has grown up with lesbian moms and is constantly being surrounded by people of the LGBTQ+ community, I can confidently tell you that, for the most part, people tend to use this word. People might identify as queer if they do not know if they identify as a certain term, like lesbian, gay, bi, etc. But, on the other hand, I cannot speak for everyone in the LGBTQ+ community, and there are probably still people who take offense when this word is used.


message 19: by Ryan (new)

Ryan There are still many yes, who still take offense to it. Though - and I say this via my own experiences - this seems to be more prominent in those who take offense to virtually anything not per their liking.


message 20: by David (new)

David It’s been a slur, yes, but it’s been reclaimed and used in a lot of scholarship such as Queer Theory. Also many use it as an accessible blanket term for the many and varied sexual and gender identities one can have. I understand that the use of the word can feel harmful to those who have been the recipients of queer as a slur, but within the community, it isn’t being utilized inappropriately.


message 21: by Aubrey (last edited Jun 15, 2020 09:03PM) (new)

Aubrey Don't drink the TERF koolaid, folks. People like "I Have No Life Other Than Trolling On Goodreads" Ryan feed on the division.


message 22: by Ryan (last edited Jun 16, 2020 08:18PM) (new)

Ryan Aubrey wrote: "Don't drink the TERF koolaid, folks. People like "I Have No Life Other Than Trolling On Goodreads" Ryan feed on the division."

Honestly, if your only tactic is name-calling; you might want to rethink what you said. Not only to me, but to yourself as well.

Also, how is this related to TERF's? Even the barest of feminism hasn't been mentioned as of yet, let alone the variety you describe.


message 23: by Alaina (new)

Alaina Lisanti How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-worthy or that people shouldn’t reclaim queer.


message 24: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Alaina wrote: "How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-worthy or that people shouldn’t reclaim queer."

She doesn't seem to like my views all that much. In particular, my egalitarianism, indifference to the various "-LM's", and personal dislike for Pride Month. As a result, she seems to be unable, unwilling, or both of the two; to handle my very existence.


message 25: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Alaina wrote: "How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-worthy or that people shouldn’t reclaim queer."

Ryan's built up quite the reputation over at the Anti-Racist article that's been headlining the past few weeks. The fact that they've butted in here and in other articles devoted to queer lit is hardly coincidence. This comment pretty much sums up Ryan's behavior: https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...


message 26: by Ryan (last edited Jun 19, 2020 03:46PM) (new)

Ryan Aubrey wrote: "Alaina wrote: "How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-worthy or that people should..."

Well first of all, if I've gained a reputation, I don't notice it nor care for that matter. Secondly, that comment reflects the more improper comments of mine. Ones of an untamed and at the time; not fully lucid mind. I won't deny that my continued presence there on that day was unneeded - fatigue performs strange manners to a person - but perhaps you ought to look back a ways. To the 23rd message. That more proper summarizes me. If it helps matters, I do apologize for the latter intrusions, and will remember not to repeat such a mistake. Though regardless, it seems they misunderstood even my drowsy comments. Of which has - as expected from past encounters - leeched from one to the other. It still does not permit why I am a TERF however, I've yet to comment on feminism and/or transgenderism not only to those articles, but to my recolllection throughout the whole of Goodreads.

Of course, you again are likely ignoring this. It seems the only words you want to hear, are those of either yourself or to the few who listen. The only words warranted to your opposition, are ones in-like manners of either the juvenile or feeble. After all, attributing such names and titles to someone, who has otherwise merely expressed views of personal disfavour, reminds me - if I may insert truthfully - of an almost Trumpistic rhetoric. Complete with the advocacy of silencing the other side, as noted in your repeated insistence to the Goodreads staff, for them to wipe the thread clean of the various comments on there.


message 27: by nat (new)

nat Ryan wrote: "Aubrey wrote: "Alaina wrote: "How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-worthy or tha..."

the fact you said 'transgenderism' solidifies everyone's negative thoughts about you


message 28: by Ryan (last edited Jun 19, 2020 04:00PM) (new)

Ryan faith ✨ wrote: "Ryan wrote: "Aubrey wrote: "Alaina wrote: "How is he trolling and what does this have to do with TERFs? I know a lot of TERFs don’t like the term “queer” but I don’t think Ryan said anything troll-..."

Well, I thought just saying "transgender" in lieu of the prior word; would've sounded off. At least it did to me last night, when I wrote the comment not long before bed. I understand the term, though, often is used in an ill manner - mostly by the more conservatively minded it seems. But unless it is used, as a term going against transgender people; which in this case was not so; I see no reason why it ought to give more of a negative view. It was used solely to refer to people of the sort, neither for or against them; merely as to denote who and what I was describing there. Much as I referred to feminism in the same sentence.


message 29: by SolarSatan (new)

SolarSatan transphobia isn't an issue that should be prioritised i think we should invest in ensuring the globalist rise and greater economics


message 30: by SolarSatan (new)

SolarSatan All Cops Are Bastards wrote: "Argh, I'm glad someone enjoys this stuff, but where's the queer fiction fad for *adults*? Also, here's my SFF bias, but I really don't get the appeal of all the real-life settings. Oh, school, how ..." police brutality is a great thing and i encourage it


message 31: by SolarSatan (new)

SolarSatan baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"

queer lol


message 32: by Ryan (new)

Ryan SolarSatan wrote: "baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT..."

I don't think we need another here causing problems. Aubrey is enough for this.


message 33: by SolarSatan (new)

SolarSatan Ryan wrote: "SolarSatan wrote: "baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’..."

yes aubrey does not follow allah


message 34: by Ryan (last edited Jun 19, 2020 04:34PM) (new)

Ryan SolarSatan wrote: "Ryan wrote: "SolarSatan wrote: "baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good loo..."

Well, you never know. She might just follow Allah as in a God - Allah is just the Arabic word for God after all - not to that of Islam's.


message 35: by Erin (new)

Erin baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"
A lot of terms people use nowadays are reclaimed slurs including gay. Queer is a term that's very old and while it's been used as a slur before it's been largely reclaimed. The vast majority of lgbt people (including me) like the word queer because it's easy to say and inclusive, there's no need to keep expanding the acronym when queer includes everyone who's not cishet and there's no gatekeeping. There's a saying I've heard before "Not queer as in gay, queer as in f**k you", it's a word that people fought to reclaim and why give bigots back a weapon when we can wear it like a badge of honour.


message 36: by Brigid (new)

Brigid baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT or LGBT+?"

I used to respond as you do to the word queer, even though it's widely used in my circles, but I've come to love it.

To me, queer is a very fluid term that can encompass a lot of identities, and leaves room for shifting self-perceptions.

I used to prefer lesbian, but when it comes down to it, I think "lesbian" can fail to leave space for trans people. I could fall in love with a trans man, before he's even ready to understand his own identity, but the word lesbian would undermine his identity even when he is ready to transition. I also keep myself open to dating trans people at large (trans men, trans women, nonbinary folks, etc), but I am not interested in cis men. So bi doesn't fit me; lesbian doesn't fit me; queer leaves space for conversation and variables. It allows me to maintain my identity within the gay community, without my terminology seeming so rigid as to be exclusionary.

I'm curious, if you don't mind answering, how old are you, and what part of the world are you in? I'm wondering if the word carries different connotations in different communities.


message 37: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Brigid wrote: "baby wrote: "Why is the word “queer” used in there title, it is still a derogatory slur and implying that LGBT people are weird and abnormal really is not a good look :( why don’t you just use LGBT..."

I would like, though, how you came to think the term "lesbian" does as such. To my recollection, it's definition poses no such restriction; par perhaps for N/B. Though I'm sure it could be passed by in a pinch, or if so; counted by birth-sex.


thegoddessofliterature All Cops Are Bastards wrote: "Argh, I'm glad someone enjoys this stuff, but where's the queer fiction fad for *adults*? Also, here's my SFF bias, but I really don't get the appeal of all the real-life settings. Oh, school, how ..."

I agree. I really want to read some adult F/F romance.


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