Sicily Quotes

Quotes tagged as "sicily" Showing 1-30 of 41
Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
“Noi fummo i Gattopardi, i Leoni; quelli che ci sostituiranno saranno gli sciacalletti, le iene; e tutti quanti gattopardi, sciacalli e pecore, continueremo a crederci il sale della terra."

("We were the Leopards, the Lions; those who'll take our place will be little jackals, hyenas; and the whole lot of us, Leopards, jackals, and sheep, we'll all go on thinking ourselves the salt of the earth.")
Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, The Leopard

Estelle Getty
“sticks and stones might break your bones, but cement pays homage to tradition.”
Estelle Getty

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
“For over twenty-five centuries we’ve been bearing the weight of superb and heterogeneous civilizations, all from outside, none made by ourselves, none that we could call our own.

This violence of landscape, this cruelty of climate, this continual tension in everything, and even these monuments of the past, magnificent yet incomprehensible because not built by us and yet standing round us like lovely mute ghosts; all those rulers who landed by main force from every direction who were at once obeyed, soon detested, and always misunderstood, their only expressions works of art we couldn't understand and taxes which we understood only too well and which they spent elsewhere: all these things have formed our character, which is thus conditioned by events outside our control as well as by a terrifying insularity of mind.”
Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, The Leopard

Leonardo Sciascia
“I hate and detest Sicily in so far as I love it, and in so far as it does not respond to the kind of love I would like to have for it.”
Leonardo Sciascia

Leonardo Sciascia
“Maybe the whole of italy is becoming a sort of Sicily.”
Leonardo Sciascia, The Day of the Owl

Leonardo Sciascia
“Scientists say that the palm tree line, that is the climate suitable to growth of the palm, is moving north, five hundred metres, I think it was, every year...The palm tree line...I call it the coffee line, the strong black coffee line...It's rising like mercury in a thermometer, this palm tree line, this strong coffee line, this scandal line, rising up throughout Italy and already passed Rome...”
Leonardo Sciascia, The Day of the Owl

Booker T. Washington
“The Negro is not the man farthest down. The condition of the coloured farmer in the most backward parts of the Southern States of America, even where he has the least education and the least encouragement, is incomparably better than the condition and opportunities of the agricultural population in Sicily.”
Booker T. Washington, The Man Farthest Down: A Record Of Observation And Study In Europe

Tembi Locke
“Cooking is about surrender.”
Tembi Locke, From Scratch: A Memoir of Love, Sicily, and Finding Home

Leonardo Sciascia
“There's a proverb, a maxim, that runs, 'The dead man is dead; let's give a hand to the living.' Now, you say that to a man from the North, and he visualizes the scene of an accident with one dead and one injured man; it's reasonable to let the dead man be and to set about saving the injured man. But a Sicilian visualizes a murdered man and his murderer, and the living man who's to be helped is the murderer.”
Leonardo Sciascia, To Each His Own

Matt Goulding
“But you don't come to Palermo to stay in minimalist hotels and eat avocado toast; you come to Palermo to be in Palermo, to drink espressos as dark and thick as crude oil, to eat tangles of toothsome spaghetti bathed in buttery sea urchins, to wander the streets at night, feeling perfectly charmed on one block, slightly concerned on the next. To get lost. After a few days, you learn to turn down one street because it smells like jasmine and honeysuckle in the morning; you learn to avoid another street because in the heat of the afternoon the air is thick with the suggestion of swordfish three days past its prime.”
Matt Goulding, Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy's Food Culture

Rosanna Chiofalo
“It was an overcast day, but the cloudy weather did not detract from the signs of spring that were evident all around them. It was the second week in March, and the official start of the season was just a couple of weeks away. The magnolia trees had already bloomed, and tulips, daffodils, and wildflowers were shooting up all around the convent's gardens.”
Rosanna Chiofalo, Rosalia's Bittersweet Pastry Shop

Matt Goulding
“Palermo is dotted everywhere with frittura shacks- street carts and storefronts specializing in fried foods of all shapes and cardiac impacts. On the fringes of the Ballarò market are bars serving pane e panelle, fried wedges of mashed chickpeas combined with potato fritters and stuffed into a roll the size of a catcher's mitt. This is how the vendors start their days; this is how you should start yours, too. If fried chickpea sandwiches don't register as breakfast food, consider an early evening at Friggitoria Chiluzzo, posted on a plastic stool with a pack of locals, knocking back beers with plates of fried artichokes and arancini, glorious balls of saffron-stained rice stuffed with ragù and fried golden- another delicious ode to Africa.
Indeed, frying food is one of the favorite pastimes of the palermitani, and they do it- as all great frying should be done- with a mix of skill and reckless abandon. Ganci is among the city's most beloved oil baths, a sliver of a store offering more calories per square foot than anywhere I've ever eaten. You can smell the mischief a block before you hit the front door: pizza topped with french fries and fried eggplant, fried rice balls stuffed with ham and cubes of mozzarella, and a ghastly concoction called spiedino that involves a brick of béchamel and meat sauce coated in bread crumbs and fried until you could break someone's window with it.”
Matt Goulding, Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy's Food Culture

Matt Goulding
“All of this could fall flat, feel too much like a caricature of a Sicilian trattoria, if the food itself weren't so damn good: arancini, saffron-scented rice fried into crunchy, greaseless golf balls; polpette di pesce spada, swordfish meatballs with a taste so deep and savory they might as well be made of dry-aged beef; and a superlative version of caponata di melanzane, that ubiquitous Sicilian starter of eggplant, capers, and various other vegetation, stewed into a sweet and savory jam that you will want to smear on everything. Everything around you screams Italy, but those flavors on the end of the fork? The sweet-and-sour tandem, the stain of saffron, the grains of rice: pure Africa.
The pasta: even better. Chewy noodles tinted jet black with squid ink and tossed with sautéed rings and crispy legs of calamari- a sort of nose-to-tail homage to the island's cherished cephalopod. And Palermo's most famous dish, pasta con le sarde, a bulge of thick spaghetti strewn with wild fennel, capers, raisins, and, most critically, a half dozen plump sardines slow cooked until they melt into a briny ocean ragù. Sweet, salty, fatty, funky- Palermo in a single bite.”
Matt Goulding, Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy's Food Culture

Lily Prior
“The gardens at Acquasanta was the nearest place to paradise that I had ever seen. Well-trimmed palm trees and sweet-smelling pines were interspersed with fruit trees bearing oranges, lemons, grapefruits, and kumquats. The branches bowed down under the weight of the golden fruit.
Low box hedges bordered the flower gardens. There were cornflowers and sweet peas and arum lilies. Terra cotta pots the size of men trailed trains of ivy and overflowed with pink geraniums.”
Lily Prior, La Cucina

Hannah Tunnicliffe
“This is where I come to eat lunch most days. The café is generally quiet and cool. It's across the road from the beach, which is rocky and met by the pale green, glittering sea. The caféiss't pretty or fancy; the food's simple and traditional. Some days the cook is late and they serve only what the man at the bar can grill or fry- whole fish, the silver scales marked with charred black lines, and home-cut potato fries. On very hot days, I order gelato brioche or granita.”
Hannah Tunnicliffe, Season of Salt and Honey

Matt Goulding
“By first light, immigrants haul crates of melons and buckets of ice over the narrow cobblestone streets. Old men sell salted capers and branches of wild oregano while the young ones build their fish stands, one silvery torqued body at a time, like an edible art installation. It's a startling scene: gruff young palermitani, foul-mouthed and wreathed in cigarette smoke, lovingly laying out each fish at just the right angle, burrowing its belly into the ice as if to mimic its swimming position in the ocean. Sicilian sun and soil and ingenuity have long produced some of Italy's most prized raw ingredients, and the colors of the market serve as a map of the island's agricultural prowess: the forest green pistachios of Bronte; the Crayola-bright lemons and oranges of Paternò; the famous pomodorini of Pachino, fiery orbs of magical tomato intensity.”
Matt Goulding, Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy's Food Culture

Matt Goulding
“You'll find trattorie brimming with the spirit of Sicily no matter which direction you head from the Four Corners. At Zia Pina, you will find no menu at all, just Pina and her helpers cooking up great piles of stuffed sardines, baby octopus, and fried red mullet. At Trattoria Basile, you take your ticket and build your meal piece by piece: a few stuffed eggplant, a plate of spaghetti and clams, maybe a bit of grilled sausage.”
Matt Goulding, Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy's Food Culture

Edward Falco
“Sicilians never forget and they never forgive. This is a truth you must always keep in mind.”
Edward Falco, The Family Corleone

Anna Del Conte
“The precept of Italian cooking is that the ingredient must always be respected and appreciated in its own right.

Respect for ingredients is common to most Mediterranean cooking. It is also ancient, as can be seen by reading the Sicilian cookery writer Archestratus, who lived in the fourth century BC, when Sicily was part of the Greek empire. He writes: ‘Sauces of cheese or pickled herbs are added to inferior fish, but in general this cooking is not based on sauces, the preference being for the addition of oil and light herbs to the fish juices. Meats are prepared with equal simplicity. Ingredients are cooked with few flavourings.’ Such flavouring as there is comes from the beginning of the cooking, often in the form of a battuto or a soffritto, which together form the point of departure of most dishes. Many dishes from these northern regions are ‘slow food’, cooked at length to suit the long cold evenings by the fire.”
Anna Del Conte, The Classic Food of Northern Italy

“But it seemed to him the world was brighter, more intense, more alive than he had remembered. Colours were more vibrant, shimmering; the scents of ordinary things, wet pavement, bricks in sunlight, unripe peaches, felt layered and dizzyingly complex.”
Steven Price, Lampedusa

“C'è un determinato momento della nostra tragedia meridionale, al fondo di tutte le cose, in cui troviamo l'origine di tutto, e cioè la nostra stessa incapacità a vivere come società.”
Giuseppe Fava, Processo alla Sicilia

“E me ne sono andato via dalla nostra Sicilia facendomi una convinzione: l'unica cosa che si può fare è la villeggiatura, dopo di che niente. Niente di niente.”
Pietrangelo Buttafuoco

Tembi Locke
“I was witnessing another example of the way community functioned so tightly here, for better or for worse. Each of the women on this street will be called upon and expected to participate in the illness or death of the others. They held one another up, it was a custom as ancient and alive as the ruins of Sicily's Harrah temple.”
Tembi Locke, From Scratch: A Memoir of Love, Sicily, and Finding Home

“In fondo al dramma del Sud c'è questa nostra solitudine umana: ognuno di noi è debole poiché è solo; ed è solo poiché rifiuta di avere fiducia o speranza negli altri, poiché è orgogliosamente convinto di poterne fare a meno.”
Giuseppe Fava, Processo alla Sicilia

“Non c'è in tutta l'Europa un popolo così orgoglioso e infelice come quello siciliano, che faccia tanto male a se stesso, ma non c'è nemmeno un popolo che abbia tanta devozione alla sua terra, e che abbia altrettanto coraggio di lottare per l'esistenza, e tanta violenza, tanto amore per la vita.”
Giuseppe Fava, Processo alla Sicilia

Simonetta Agnello Hornby
“Al sorgere del sole le ombre umide della notte si ritiravano dal le falde deserte, lasciandovi pennellate azzurre; le messi ristorate frusciavano e gli uccelli vi svolazzavano in cerca di cibo. Il cielo acquisiva profondità e diventava blu intenso. Poi sbiancava, incandescente. Il sole a picco dominava e folgorava ogni cosa, inesorabile. Gli uccelli, stanchi e accecati dalla luce sfavillante, si rifugiavano dietro le pietre; erbe e piante ai bordi dei sentieri tratteneva no i profumi e abbassavano le foglie arse. Le ombre assetate della sera - lunghe, nette, rosse - risvegliavano insetti, uccelli e odori campestri. Il sole tramontava dietro le colline in una fantasmagorìa di rosso, giallo, amaranto, violetto. Poi la calma.”
Simonetta Agnello Hornby, La zia marchesa

Simonetta Agnello Hornby
“Costanza non capiva sino in fondo, ma non poneva domande, tanto le piacevano quelle passeggiate in carrozza, seduta orgogliosa accanto al fratello maggiore, su e giù per il lungomare. Da un lato c'erano i grandi palazzi nobiliari con le loro terrazze lussureggianti. Sul marciapiede gremito di gente benvestita per la passeggiata si aprivano i caffè della Marina, davanti ai quali si fermavano le carrozze per il gelato. La strada costeggiava il mare limpido, tranquillo, su cui si rifletteva a occidente, magnifico, il lare protettore: Monte Pellegrino. I camerieri li servivano in carrozza. Si facevano strada in mezzo ai clienti seduti ai tavolini e alla gente che passeggiava davanti a loro tenendo in bilico sul braccio teso in alto, sulle teste dei passanti, grandi vassoi rotondi con sopra bicchieri d'acqua e coppette di metallo argentato piene di gelato rasato al bordo. Su ognuna era infilzato un biscotto tubolare, croccante. Costanza era golosa: assaporava con voluttà persino l'acqua dolce e rinfrescante, che sorbiva a piccoli sorsi dopo il gelato.”
Simonetta Agnello Hornby, La zia marchesa

Simonetta Agnello Hornby
“Amuri è cuntintizza.”
Simonetta Agnello Hornby

Simonetta Agnello Hornby
“Il tempo stava cambiando. Nuvoloni grigi spuntavano minacciosi dietro la cerchia dei monti alle spalle della città; lì il cielo era livido. Una grossa nuvola coprì il sole e la terrazza si oscurò all'improvviso. Il barone sollevò gli occhi malati e li puntò su Monte Pellegrino. Lo vedeva sfocato in lontananza, stagliato contro il cielo: ma il monte aveva già cambiato colore. Nuove sfumature - blu, viola - lo rendevano austero e minaccioso. Quella montagna dalle proporzioni perfette e dalla solida bellezza era il guardiano del golfo: una mitica fiera accovacciata e immersa a metà nel mare - groppa e gambe emergevano nelle loro forme angolose -, ma pronta a trarsi dal sonno e a drizzarsi contro chi osasse avvicinarsi alla città. Domenico Safamita amava Palermo d'una passione quasi fisica. "Si distruggono monasteri, palazzi, si sventrano quartieri. Non importa che manchi l'acqua, che le fognature siano rudimentali o inesistenti, che il popolino viva in tuguri e muoia di fame e malattie: i palermitani vogliono un nuovo grandioso teatro lirico. Sempre più bella e più abietta, mai come ora Palermo si rivela magnifica e compiaciuta di aver mantenuto la sua identità di città superlativamente cortigiana. A Palermo anche le pietre sudano sensualità." Sulla sinistra la nuova strada, larghissima, finiva a mare.
Lì sembrava essere calata la notte e l'acqua era cosparsa di puntini luccicanti: le prime lampare dei pescatori. La nuvola scivolò dal sole e tutto ritornò come prima: il mare era una macchia scura senza bagliori, Monte Pellegrino, appena rosato, si stagliava netto e benigno.”
Simonetta Agnello Hornby, La zia marchesa

“Ma gli altri, tutti quegli altri ragazzi a cui il «miracolo» di Anastasi ha dato un simbolo, un barlume di speranza, un anelito nuovo? Potranno almeno sperare di tenergli dietro e di vincere la vita, non sulle sole vie dello sport? Saremo un giorno anche noi come gli altri, in una società più civile, più larga di stimoli e di possibilità? Se un giorno lo saremo, se ogni piccolo siciliano potrà partire sulla stessa linea del suo fratello di Milano o di Verona, e non sembrerà più un miracolo che riesca, vorrà dire che avremo inteso sino in fondo che cosa vale e che cosa significa la favola dolce-amara del ragazzo che se ne andò dalla sua modesta casetta e fece tremare l'Olimpico.
– dalla prefazione di Luigi Prestinenza, "Brividi all'Olimpico”
Mario Continella, Anastasi. Favola e realtà

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