Schizophrenia Quotes

Quotes tagged as "schizophrenia" Showing 1-30 of 120
Philip K. Dick
“Maybe each human being lives in a unique world, a private world different from those inhabited and experienced by all other humans. . . If reality differs from person to person, can we speak of reality singular, or shouldn't we really be talking about plural realities? And if there are plural realities, are some more true (more real) than others? What about the world of a schizophrenic? Maybe it's as real as our world. Maybe we cannot say that we are in touch with reality and he is not, but should instead say, His reality is so different from ours that he can't explain his to us, and we can't explain ours to him. The problem, then, is that if subjective worlds are experienced too differently, there occurs a breakdown in communication ... and there is the real illness.”
Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick
“If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
Philip K. Dick

Emilie Autumn
“Oh, and I certainly don't suffer from schizophrenia. I quite enjoy it. And so do I.”
Emilie Autumn

Francesca Zappia
“Sometimes I think people take reality for granted.”
Francesca Zappia, Made You Up

Michael Thomas Ford
“I didn't realize there was a ranking." I said. "Sadie frowned. "What do you mean?" "A ranking," I said. "You know, what's crazier than what." "Oh, sure there is," Sadie said. She sat back in her chair. "First you have your generic depressives. They're a dime a dozen and usually pretty boring. Then you've got the bulimics and the anorexics. They're slightly more interesting, although usually they're just girls with nothing better to do. Then you start getting into the good stuff: the arsonists, the schizophrenics, the manic-depressives. You can never quite tell what those will do. And then you've got the junkies. They're completely tragic, because chances are they're just going to go right back on the stuff when they're out of here." "So junkies are at the top of the crazy chain," I said. Sadie shook her head. "Uh-uh," she said. "Suicides are." I looked at her. "Why?" "Anyone can be crazy," she answered. "That's usually just because there's something screwed up in your wiring, you know? But suicide is a whole different thing. I mean, how much do you have to hate yourself to want to just wipe yourself out?”
Michael Thomas Ford

Criss Jami
“I think a lot of psychopaths are just geniuses who drove so fast that they lost control.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Joseph Campbell
“The psychotic drowns in the same waters in which the mystic swims with delight.”
Joseph Campbell, Psychology of the Future: Lessons from Modern Consciousness Research

Francesca Zappia
“Believing something existed and then finding out it didn't was like reaching the top of the stairs and thinking there was one more step.”
Francesca Zappia, Made You Up

Irvine Welsh
“We wait and think and doubt and hate. How does it make you feel? The overwhelming feeling is rage. We hate ourself for being unable to be other than what we are. Unable to be better. We feel rage. The feelings must be followed. It doesn't matter whether you're an ideologue or a sensualist, you follow the stimuli thinking that they're your signposts to the promised land. But they are nothing of the kind. What they are is rocks to navigate the past, each on your brush against, ripping you a little more open and they are always more on the horizon. But you can't face up to the that, so you force yourself to believe the bullshit of those you instinctively know are liars and you repeat those lies to yourself and to others, hoping that by repeating them often and fervently enough you'll attain the godlike status we accord those who tell the lies most frequently and most passionately. But you never do, and even if you could, you wouldn't value it, you'd realise that nobody believes in heroes any more. We know that they only want to sell us something we don't really want and keep from us what we really do need. Maybe that's a good thing. Maybe we're getting in touch with our condition at last. It's horrible how we always die alone, but no worse than living alone.”
Irvine Welsh, Filth

Mark Vonnegut
“Knowing that you're crazy doesn't make the crazy things stop happening.”
Mark Vonnegut, The Eden Express: A Memoir of Insanity

Susan Ee
“My dad once told me life would get complicated when I grew up. I’m guessing this isn’t what he meant. My mom, on the other hand, agreed with him, and I’m guessing this kind of thing is exactly what she meant.”
Susan Ee, World After

“Am I a mindless fool? My life is a fragment, a disconnected dream that has no continuity. I am so tired of senselessness. I am tired of the music that my feelings sing, the dream music.”
Ross David Burke, When the Music's Over: My Journey into Schizophrenia

Francesca Zappia
“I didn't have the luxury of taking reality for granted. And I wouldn't say I hated people who did, because that's just about everyone. I didn't hate them. They didn't live in my world.

But that never stopped me from wishing I lived in theirs.”
Francesca Zappia, Made You Up

R.D. Laing
“Schizophrenia cannot be understood without understanding despair.”
R.D. Laing

Kevin Alan Lee
“In my opinion, our health care system has failed when a doctor fails to treat an illness that is treatable.”
Kevin Alan Lee, The Split Mind: Schizophrenia from an Insider's Point of View

Mira Bartok
“We children of schizophrenics are the great secret keepers, the ones who don't want you to think that anything is wrong.”
Mira Bartok, The Memory Palace

Joseph Campbell
“The LSD phenomenon, on the other hand, is—to me at least—more interesting. It is an intentionally achieved schizophrenia, with the expectation of a spontaneous remission—which, however, does not always follow. Yoga, too, is intentional schizophrenia: one breaks away from the world, plunging inward, and the ranges of vision experienced are in fact the same as those of a psychosis. But what, then, is the difference? What is the difference between a psychotic or LSD experience and a yogic, or a mystical? The plunges are all into the same deep inward sea; of that there can be no doubt. The symbolic figures encountered are in many instances identical (and I shall have something more to say about those in a moment). But there is an important difference. The difference—to put it sharply—is equivalent simply to that between a diver who can swim and one who cannot. The mystic, endowed with native talents for this sort of thing and following, stage by stage, the instruction of a master, enters the waters and finds he can swim; whereas the schizophrenic, unprepared, unguided, and ungifted, has fallen or has intentionally plunged, and is drowning.”
Joseph Campbell, Myths to Live By

Jonathan Harnisch
“I keep moving ahead, as always, knowing deep down inside that I am a good person and that I am worthy of a good life.”
Jonathan Harnisch

Rebecca McNutt
“Some of the most evil human beings in the world are psychiatrists. Not all psychiatrists. Some psychiatrists are selfless, caring people who really want to help. But the sad truth is that in today's society, mental health isn't a science. It's an industry. Ritalin, Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Resperidone, happy pills that are supposed to "normalize" the behavior of our families, our colleagues, our friends - tell me that doesn't sound the least bit creepy! Mental health is subjective. To us, a little girl talking to her pretend friends instead of other children might just be harmless playing around. To a psychiatrist, it's a financial opportunity. Automatically, the kid could be swept up in a sea of labels. "not talking to other kids? Okay, she's asocial!" or "imaginary friends? Bingo, she has schizophrenia!" I'm not saying in any way that schizophrenia and social disorders aren't real. But the alarming number of people, especially children, who seem to have these "illnesses" and need to be medicated or locked up... it's horrifying. The psychiatrists get their prestigious reputation and their money to burn. The drug companies get fast cash and a chance to claim that they've discovered a wonder-drug, capable of "curing" anyone who might be a burden on society... that's what it's all about. It's not about really talking to these troubled people and finding out what they need. It's about giving them a pill that fits a pattern, a weapon to normalize people who might make society uncomfortable. The psychiatrists get their weapon. Today's generations get cheated out of their childhoods. The mental health industry takes the world's most vulnerable people and messes with their heads, giving them controlled substances just because they don't fit the normal puzzle. And sadly, it's more or less going to get worse in this rapidly advancing century.”
Rebecca McNutt

“I tried to figure out the answer in books. The more books I read, though, the more it became clear that there was no simple answer as to what schizophrenia is, or what causes it. There was, if anything, a charged and polarized disagreement, a complicated one, one I had never known about before.”
Sandra Allen, A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise: A True Story About Schizophrenia

Kurt Vonnegut
“I did not and do not know for certain that I have that disease [schizophrenia]. This much I knew and know: I was making myself hideously uncomfortable by not narrowing my attention to details of life which were immediately important, and by refusing to believe what my neighbors believed.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions

“Thought creates a schism in everyday life. One's mind is one place, and one's body another.”
Marty Rubin

Neal Shusterman
“Tout ce qui est horrible porte un versant magnifique”
Neal Shusterman

“We defend so cautiously against our egoically limited experiences, states Laing in The Politics of Experience, that it is not surprising to see people grow defensive and panic at the idea of experiencing ego-loss through the use of drugs or collective experiences. But there is nothing pathological about ego-loss, Laing adds; quite the contrary. Ego-loss is the experience of all mankind, "of the primal man, of Adam and perhaps even [a journey] further into the beings of animals, vegetables and minerals." No age, Laing concludes, has so lost touch with this healing process as has ours. Deleuze and Guattari's schizoanalytic approach serves to begin such a healing process. Its major task is to destroy the oedipalized and neuroticized individual dependencies through the forging of a collective subjectivity, a nonfascist subject—anti-Oedipus. Anti-Oedipus is an individual or a group that no longer functions in terms of beliefs and that comes to redeem mankind, as Nietzsche foresaw, not only from the ideals that weighed it down, "but also from that which was bound to grow out of it, the great nausea, the will to nothingness, nihilism; this bell-stroke of noon and of the great decision that liberates the will again and restores its goal to the earth and his hope to man; this Antichrist and antinihilist. . . He must come one day.—”
Mark Seem, Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

Jia Apple
“Dad is the big bad and the big good. He throws things, he feeds us, he beats us, he dresses our wounds. And each day we live, we don't know if he is going to kill us or save our lives.”
Jia Apple, Oft Made to Wonder: a young girl's journey

“...I'd learned right away, a psychiatric diagnosis like schizophrenia is a hypothesis. There is no test to prove you have schizophrenia. The best doctor on earth cannot 'see' schizophrenia in your blood, in your hair, in your piss, in your genes.”
Sandra Allen, A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise: A True Story About Schizophrenia

“One of the most studied ideas as to what causes schizophrenia is the 'chemical imbalance theory,' which derives psychiatric pharmaceuticals themselves. Though the 'mechanism of action' of drugs marketed for their 'antipsychotic' properties isn't understood--plainly, drug companies believe these drugs are effective in lessening psychiatric symptoms, but they don't actually know why--what is known is that they affect chemical levels in the brain. It's therefore supposed that abnormal chemical levels might somehow be crucial to understanding what's different about the brains of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Testing chemical levels inside brains remains impossible. Despite billions of dollars of investigation, the chemical imbalance theory has never been confirmed.”
Sandra Allen, A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise: A True Story About Schizophrenia

“As some alternatives have taken root in this country in recent decades, others have worked to oppose them. Some groups feel that health care solutions that don't emphasize medication first and foremost are misguided--and even dangerous. Proponents of this position feel they are defending the 'right to treatment' or 'right to care.' They might grapple with the fact that many who receive psychiatric diagnoses often dispute them, and that many patients resist taking psychiatric medications. Some psychiatrists conclude that patients who are resistant to treatment are exhibiting signs of 'anosognosia,' or 'lack of insight' about their own disease. Psychiatric survivors I've spoken with find this charge--that a doctor might tell a patient she cannot understand herself, her own mind--to be especially offensive.”
Sandra Allen, A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise: A True Story About Schizophrenia

Alain Bremond-Torrent
“Dancing is like schizophrenia.”
Alain Bremond-Torrent, running is flying intermittently

“Go to hell, World! I cannot die in peace and safety. I cannot face the slightest breath of real life or death or ugliness. But I hurt for being such a coward. I was always a coward – socially, physically, mentally, sexually, emotionally. If I go insane, am I brave? I will, because then, and only then, I am brave, not a coward. [An excerpt from the diary of Jean Bouricius' son]”
Richard P. Bentall, Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature

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