Stereotypes Quotes

Quotes tagged as "stereotypes" Showing 1-30 of 319
Bette Davis
“When a man gives his opinion, he's a man. When a woman gives her opinion, she's a bitch.”
Bette Davis

Jane Austen
“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Virginia Woolf
“As long as she thinks of a man, nobody objects to a woman thinking.”
Virginia Woolf, Orlando

Dorothy L. Sayers
“Wherever you find a great man, you will find a great mother or a great wife standing behind him -- or so they used to say. It would be interesting to know how many great women have had great fathers and husbands behind them.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

Mary Wollstonecraft
“My own sex, I hope, will excuse me, if I treat them like rational creatures, instead of flattering their fascinating graces, and viewing them as if they were in a state of perpetual childhood, unable to stand alone.”
Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Jane Austen
“I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men."

"Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Peter Ustinov
“I imagine hell like this: Italian punctuality, German humour and English wine.”
Peter Ustinov

Stephenie Meyer
“Did you seriously just stamp your foot? I thought girls only did that on TV.”
Stephenie Meyer, Eclipse

Søren Kierkegaard
“Once you label me you negate me.”
Søren Kierkegaard

Moderata Fonte
“Do you really believe ... that everything historians tell us about men – or about women – is actually true? You ought to consider the fact that these histories have been written by men, who never tell the truth except by accident.”
Moderata Fonte, The Worth of Women: Wherein Is Clearly Revealed Their Nobility and Their Superiority to Men

C. JoyBell C.
“I don't fit into any stereotypes. And I like myself that way.”
C. JoyBell C.

Charlotte Brontë
“If men could see us as we really are, they would be a little amazed; but the cleverest, the acutest men are often under an illusion about women: they do not read them in a true light: they misapprehend them, both for good and evil: their good woman is a queer thing, half doll, half angel; their bad woman almost always a fiend.”
Charlotte Brontë, Shirley

Dorothy L. Sayers
“A man once asked me ... how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. "Well," said the man, "I shouldn't have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing." I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Tamora Pierce
“Why do boys say someone acts like a girl as if it were an insult?”
Tamora Pierce, In the Hand of the Goddess

Mary Wollstonecraft
“[I]f we revert to history, we shall find that the women who have distinguished themselves have neither been the most beautiful nor the most gentle of their sex.”
Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Virginia Woolf
“Anything may happen when womanhood has ceased to be a protected occupation.”
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Mary Wollstonecraft
“Taught from their infancy that beauty is woman's sceptre, the mind shapes itself to the body, and roaming round its gilt cage, only seeks to adorn its prison.”
Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Stephen King
“Do you drink?"
"Of course,I just said I was a writer.”
Stephen King

Margaret Mead
“Instead of being presented with stereotypes by age, sex, color, class, or religion, children must have the opportunity to learn that within each range, some people are loathsome and some are delightful.”
Margaret Mead

“16 Things Romance Readers Are Tired Of Hearin

1. All Romance books are exactly the same.
2. The endings are so predictable.
3. You know romance doesn't happen like that in real life.
4. You're setting unrealistic expectations for yourself about love.
5. Real men don't have abs like that.
6.So you think you're going to go on a lot of dates?
7. So you think you're going to fall in love with an ex-boyfriend?
8. ...or a billionaire?
9. ...or a duke?
10. So you'll stop reading romances when you have a boyfriend, right?
11. It's basically mommy porn, right?
12. I could write a romance book.
13. Do you only read female authors?
14. I saw the Notebook once.
15. Is Danielle Steel your favorite author?
16. Do you read REAL books?”
Bookbub Bulletin

Dorothy L. Sayers
“In reaction against the age-old slogan, "woman is the weaker vessel," or the still more offensive, "woman is a divine creature," we have, I think, allowed ourselves to drift into asserting that "a woman is as good as a man," without always pausing to think what exactly we mean by that. What, I feel, we ought to mean is something so obvious that it is apt to escape attention altogether, viz: (...) that a woman is just as much an ordinary human being as a man, with the same individual preferences, and with just as much right to the tastes and preferences of an individual. What is repugnant to every human being is to be reckoned always as a member of a class and not as an individual person.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Jane Austen
“She was heartily ashamed of her ignorance - a misplaced shame. Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.”
Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

Dorothy L. Sayers
“It is extraordinarily entertaining to watch the historians of the past ... entangling themselves in what they were pleased to call the "problem" of Queen Elizabeth. They invented the most complicated and astonishing reasons both for her success as a sovereign and for her tortuous matrimonial policy. She was the tool of Burleigh, she was the tool of Leicester, she was the fool of Essex; she was diseased, she was deformed, she was a man in disguise. She was a mystery, and must have some extraordinary solution. Only recently has it occrurred to a few enlightened people that the solution might be quite simple after all. She might be one of the rare people were born into the right job and put that job first.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Golda Poretsky
“I think fitting in is highly overrated. I’d rather just fit out... Fitting out means being who you are, even when people insist that you have to change. Fitting out means taking up space, not apologizing for yourself, and not agreeing with those who seek to label you with stereotypes.”
Golda Poretsky

Dorothy L. Sayers
“The rule seemed to be that a great woman must either die unwed ... or find a still greater man to marry her. ... The great man, on the other hand, could marry where he liked, not being restricted to great women; indeed, it was often found sweet and commendable in him to choose a woman of no sort of greatness at all.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

George Carlin
“I bet you anything that 10 times out of 10, Nicky, Vinny and Tony will beat the shit out of Todd, Kyle and Tucker.”
George Carlin

David Sedaris
“Kools and Newports were for black people and lower-class whites. Camels were for procrastinators, those who wrote bad poetry, and those who put off writing bad poetry. Merits were for sex addicts, Salems were for alcoholics, and Mores were for people who considered themselves to be outrageous but really weren't.”
David Sedaris, When You Are Engulfed in Flames

Karl Pilkington
“I think people would live a bit longer if they didn't know how old they were. Age puts restrictions on things.”
Karl Pilkington

“Wine and women make wise men dote and forsake God's law and do wrong."

However, the fault is not in the wine, and often not in the woman. The fault is in the one who misuses the wine or the woman or other of God's crations. Even if you get drunk on the wine and through this greed you lapse into lechery, the wine is not to blame but you are, in being unable or unwilling to discipline yourself. And even if you look at a woman and become caught up in her beauty and assent to sin [= adultery; extramarital sex], the woman is not to blame nor is the beauty given her by God to be disparaged: rather, you are to blame for not keeping your heart more clear of wicked thoughts. ... If you feel yourself tempted by the sight of a woman, control your gaze better ... You are free to leave her. Nothing constrains you to commit lechery but your own lecherous heart.”
Anonymous, Dives And Pauper

Christine de Pizan
“Does a rake deserve to possess anything of worth, since he chases everything in skirts and then imagines he can successfully hide his shame by slandering [women in general]?”
Christine de Pizan, Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

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