Cognition Quotes

Quotes tagged as "cognition" Showing 1-30 of 164
Criss Jami
“When good people consider you the bad guy, you develop a heart to help the bad ones. You actually understand them.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Criss Jami
“There are two circumstances that lead to arrogance: one is when you're wrong and you can't face it; the other is when you're right and nobody else can face it.”
Criss Jami, Diotima, Battery, Electric Personality

Oliver Sacks
“We speak not only to tell other people what we think, but to tell ourselves what we think. Speech is a part of thought.”
Oliver Sacks, Seeing Voices

Andrew Solomon
“You are constantly told in depression that your judgment is compromised, but a part of depression is that it touches cognition. That you are having a breakdown does not mean that your life isn't a mess. If there are issues you have successfully skirted or avoided for years, they come cropping back up and stare you full in the face, and one aspect of depression is a deep knowledge that the comforting doctors who assure you that your judgment is bad are wrong. You are in touch with the real terribleness of your life. You can accept rationally that later, after the medication sets in, you will be better able to deal with the terribleness, but you will not be free of it. When you are depressed, the past and future are absorbed entirely by the present moment, as in the world of a three-year-old. You cannot remember a time when you felt better, at least not clearly; and you certainly cannot imagine a future time when you will feel better.”
Andrew Solomon, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

Criss Jami
“I think a lot of psychopaths are just geniuses who drove so fast that they lost control.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Criss Jami
“Whenever I think of something but can't think of what it was I was thinking of, I can't stop thinking until I think I'm thinking of it again. I think I think too much.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Criss Jami
“The exaggerated dopamine sensitivity of the introvert leads one to believe that when in public, introverts, regardless of its validity, often feel to be the center of (unwanted) attention hence rarely craving attention. Extroverts, on the other hand, seem to never get enough attention. So on the flip side it seems as though the introvert is in a sense very external and the extrovert is in a sense very internal - the introvert constantly feels too much 'outerness' while the extrovert doesn't feel enough 'outerness'.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Lev S. Vygotsky
“A word devoid of thought is a dead thing, and a thought unembodied in words remains a shadow.”
Lev S. Vygotsky, Thought and Language

Haruki Murakami
“It is cognition that is the fantasy.... Everything I tell you now is mere words. Arrange them and rearrange them as I might, I will never be able to explain to you the form of Will... My explanation would only show the correlation between myself and that Will by means of a correlation on the verbal level. The negation of cognition thus correlates to the negation of language. For when those two pillars of Western humanism, individual cognition and evolutionary continuity, lose their meaning, language loses meaning. Existence ceases for the individuum as we know it, and all becomes chaos. You cease to be a unique entity unto yourself, but exist simply as chaos. And not just the chaos that is you; your chaos is also my chaos. To wit, existence is communication, and communication, existence.”
Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase

Criss Jami
“God judges men from the inside out; men judge men from the outside in. Perhaps to God, an extreme mental patient is doing quite well in going a month without murder, for he fought his chemical imbalance and succeeded; oppositely, perhaps the healthy, able and stable man who has never murdered in his life yet went a lifetime consciously, willingly never loving anyone but himself may then be subject to harsher judgment than the extreme mental patient. It might be so that God will stand for the weak and question the strong.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Hal Herzog
“The inconsistencies that haunt our relationships with animals also result from the quirks of human cognition. We like to think of ourselves as the rational species. But research in cognitive psychology and behavioral economics shows that our thinking and behavior are often completely illogical. In one study, for example, groups of people were independently asked how much they would give to prevent waterfowl from being killed in polluted oil ponds. On average, the subjects said they would pay $80 to save 2,000 birds, $78 to save 20,000 birds, and $88 to save 200,000 birds. Sometimes animals act more logically than people do; a recent study found that when picking a new home, the decisions of ant colonies were more rational than those of human house-hunters.
What is it about human psychology that makes it so difficult for us to think consistently about animals? The paradoxes that plague our interactions with other species are due to the fact that much of our thinking is a mire of instinct, learning, language, culture, intuition, and our reliance on mental shortcuts.”
Hal Herzog, Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals

Haruki Murakami
“As long as I stared at the clock, at least the world remained in motion. Not a very consequential world, but in motion nonetheless. And as long as I knew the world was still in motion, I knew I existed. Not a very consequential existence, but an existence nonetheless. It struck me as wanting that someone should confirm his own existence only by the hands of an electric wall clock. There had to be a more cognitive means of confirmation. But try as I might, nothing less facile came to mind.”
Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase

“Question the answers, I repeated every class. Reevaluate your conclusions when the evidence changes.”
Craig M. Mullaney, The Unforgiving Minute: A Soldier's Education

Jeff VanderMeer
“But there is a limit to thinking about even a small piece of something monumental. You still see the shadow of the whole rearing up behind you, and you become lost in your thoughts in part from the panic of realizing the size of that imagined leviathan.”
Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

Paul Valéry
“Cognition reigns but does not rule.”
Paul Valéry

Sam Harris
“There is a sense in which all cognition can be said to be motivated. One is motivated to understand the world, to be in touch with reality, to remove doubt, etc. Alternately one might say that motivation is an aspect of cognition itself. Nevertheless, motives like wanting to find the truth, not wanting to be mistaken, etc., tend to align with epistemic goals in a way that many other commitments do not. As we have begun to see, all reasoning may be inextricable from emotion. But if a person's primary motivation in holding a belief is to hue to a positive state of mind, to mitigate feelings of anxiety, embarrassment, or guilt for instance. This is precisely what we mean by phrases like "wishful thinking", and "self-deception". Such a person will of necessity be less responsive to valid chains of evidence and argument that run counter to the beliefs he is seeking to maintain. To point out non-epistemic motives in an others view of the world, therefore, is always a criticism, as it serves to cast doubt on a persons connection to the world as it is.”
Sam Harris, The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

Gad Saad
“Any human endeavor rooted in the pursuit of truth must rely on fact and not feelings.”
Gad Saad, The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense

“Our metaphors for the operation of the brain are frequently drawn from the production line. We think of the brain as a glorified sausage machine, taking in information from the senses, processing it and regurgitating it in a different form, as thoughts or actions. The digital computer reinforces this idea because it is quite explicitly a machine that does to information what a sausage machine does to pork. Indeed, the brain was the original inspiration and metaphor for the development of the digital computer, and early computers were often described as 'giant brains'. Unfortunately, neuroscientists have sometimes turned this analogy on its head, and based their models of brain function on the workings of the digital computer (for example by assuming that memory is separate and distinct from processing, as it is in a computer). This makes the whole metaphor dangerously self-reinforcing.”
Steve Grand, Creation: Life and How to Make It

“If the brain was simple enough to be understood - we would be too simple to understand it!”
Minsky M.A.

“People define you; analyze you by their own way. They see you; react at you under the best of their perception and cognition. Why people can’t accept anyone’s existence as a distinct entity? Is this due to the lack of good discernment? Or it is the direct underestimation of individuality? Maybe the acceptance of anyone’s intuitive understanding of the eternal conflict between inconsistency and compatibility.”
Raveen Paudel

“I wanted that future officer to weigh decisions with a supple mind and to be comfortable with nuance and uncertainty. ”
Craig M. Mullaney, The Unforgiving Minute: A Soldier's Education

Abhijit Naskar
“Conscience is not a dead constant, it is a living, breathing, ever-evolving force of progress – a force of upliftment.”
Abhijit Naskar, Conscience over Nonsense

“As historical texts become rich and conceptually dense, readers may slow down not because they fail to comprehend, but because the very act of comprehension demands that they stop to TALK with their texts. In plain English, they pretend to deliberate with others by talking to themselves.”
Sam Wineburg

Winifred Gallagher
“Consciousness, which is the "reflective" element of Norman's conceptual brain, handles the "higher" functions at the metaphorical tip of the very top of that complicated organ. Because consciousness pays a lot of attention to your thoughts, you tend to identify it with cognition. However, if you try to figure out exactly how you run your business or care for your family, you soon realize that you can't grasp that process just by thinking about it. As Norman puts it, "Consciousness also has a qualitative, sensory feel. If I say, 'I'm afraid,' it's not just my mind talking. My stomach also knots up.”
Winifred Gallagher

Abhijit Naskar
“Perception är 99 procent stereotyper och 1 procent sanning.”
Abhijit Naskar, When Veins Ignite: Either Integration or Degradation

Richard Powers
“You can't see what you don't understand. But what you think you already understand, you'll fail to look at.”
Richard Powers, The Overstory

Ludwik Fleck
“Thoughts pass from one individual to another, each time a little transformed, for each individual can attach to them somewhat different associations. Strictly speaking, the receiver never understands the thought exactly in the way that the transmitter intended it to be understood. After a series of such encounters, practically nothing is left of the original content. Whose thought is it that continues to circulate?”
Ludwik Fleck, Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact

Ludwik Fleck
“The current state of knowledge remains vague when history is not considered, just as history remains vague without substantive knowledge about the current state.”
Ludwik Fleck, Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact

Kim Stanley Robinson
“Ideology, n. An imaginary relationship to a real situation.

In common usage, what the other person has, especially when systematically distorting the facts.

But it seems to us that an ideology is a necessary feature of cognition, and if anyone were to lack one, which we doubt, they would be badly disabled. There is a real situation, that can't be denied, but it is too big for any individual to know in full, and so we must create our understanding by way of an act of the imagination. So we all have an ideology, and this is a good thing. So much information pours into the mind, ranging from sensory experience to discursive and mediated inputs of all kinds, that some kind of personal organizing system is necessary to make sense of things in ways that allow one to decide and to act. Worldview, philosophy, religion, these are all synonyms for ideology as defined above; and so is science, although it's a different one, the special one, by way of its perpetual cross-checking with reality tests of all kinds, and its continuous sharpening of focus. That surely makes science central to a most interesting project, which is to invent, improve, and put to use an ideology that explains in a coherent and useful way as much of the blooming buzzing inrush of the world as possible. What one would hope for in an ideology is clarity and explanatory breadth, and power. We leave the proof of this as an exercise for the reader.”
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future

“Need for cognition" is the psychological term for the tendency to engage in and enjoy hard mental slogs. [...] superforecasters score high in need-for-cognition tests.”
Philip E. Tetlock, Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction

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