Neurology Quotes

Quotes tagged as "neurology" (showing 1-30 of 55)
Cordelia Fine
“In the statistical gargon used in psychology, p refers to the probability that the difference you see between two groups (of introverts and extroverts, say, or males and females) could have occurred by chance. As a general rule, psychologists report a difference between two groups as 'significant' if the probability that it could have occurred by chance is 1 in 20, or less. The possibility of getting significant results by chance is a problem in any area of research, but it's particularly acute for sex differences research. Supppose, for example, you're a neuroscientist interested in what parts of the brain are involved in mind reading. You get fifteen participants into a scanner and ask them to guess the emotion of people in photographs. Since you have both males and females in your group, you rin a quick check to ensure that the two groups' brains respond in the same way. They do. What do you do next? Most likely, you publish your results without mentioning gender at all in your report (except to note the number of male and female participants). What you don't do is publish your findings with the title "No Sex Differences in Neural Circuitry Involved in Understanding Others' Minds." This is perfectly reasonable. After all, you weren't looking for gender difference and there were only small numbers of each sex in your study. But remember that even if males and females, overall, respond the same way on a task, five percent of studies investigating this question will throw up a "significant" difference between the sexes by chance. As Hines has explained, sex is "easily assessed, routinely evaluated, and not always reported. Because it is more interesting to find a difference than to find no difference, the 19 failures to observe a difference between men and women go unreported, whereas the 1 in 20 finding of a difference is likely to be published." This contributes to the so-called file-drawer phenomenon, whereby studies that do find sex differences get published, but those that don't languish unpublished and unseen in a researcher's file drawer.”
Cordelia Fine, Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference

Steven Wright
“My nephew has HDADHD. High Definition Attention Deficit Disorder. He can barely pay attention, but when he does it's unbelievably clear.”
Steven Wright

“The spirits of the brain are directly connected to the testicles. This is why men who weary their imagination in books are less suitable for procreative functions...”
Louis de la Forge

Jerry A. Coyne
“Which do you think is more valuable to humanity?

a. Finding ways to tell humans that they have free will despite the incontrovertible fact that their actions are completely dictated by the laws of physics as instantiated in our bodies, brains and environments? That is, engaging in the honored philosophical practice of showing that our notion of "free will" can be compatible with determinism?

or

b. Telling people, based on our scientific knowledge of physics, neurology, and behavior, that our actions are predetermined rather than dictated by some ghost in our brains, and then sussing out the consequences of that conclusion and applying them to society?



Of course my answer is b).”
Jerry A. Coyne

Abhijit Naskar
“Mother Nature created God as a neurological anti-depressant sentiment, but Man tore that God apart into pieces and made citadels of differentiation out of them.”
Abhijit Naskar, The Krishna Cancer

Oliver Sacks
“Some people with Tourette's have flinging tics- sudden, seemingly motiveless urges or compulsions to throw objects..... (I see somewhat similar flinging behaviors- though not tics- in my two year old godson, now in a stage of primal antinomianism and anarchy)”
Oliver Sacks, An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales

Alexandra Robbins
“The human brain takes in information from other people and incorporates it with the information coming from its own senses, neuroscientist Gregory Berns has written. Many times, the group's opinion trumps the individual's before he even becomes aware of it.”
Alexandra Robbins, The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School

Alexandra Robbins
“Nonconformists aren't just going against the grain; they're going against the brain. Either their brains aren't taking the easy way out to begin with, or in standing apart from their peers, these students are standing up to their biology.”
Alexandra Robbins, The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School

Abhijit Naskar
“​Everything that makes you, you, is a biologically existential expression of your entire brain.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Winifred Gallagher
“Recently, the search for what he calls "the splinters that make up different attention problems" has taken Castellanos in a new direction. First, he explains that your brain is far less concerned with your brilliant ideas or searing emotions than with its own internal "gyroscopic busyness," which consumes 65 percent of its total energy. Every fifty seconds, its activity fluctuates, causing what he calls a "brownout." No one knows the purpose of these neurological events, but Castellanos has a thesis: the clockwork pulses enable the brain's circuits to stay "logged on" and available to communicate with one another, even when they're not being used. "Imagine you're a cabdriver on your day off," Castellanos says. "You don't need to use your workday circuits on a Sunday, but to keep those channels open, your brain sends a ping through them every minute or so. The fluctuations are the brain's investment in maintaining its circuits online.”
Winifred Gallagher, Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life

“The human brain is the universe's most implausible science experiment.”
Will Boast, Daphne

Abhijit Naskar
“We gain from the new science of mind not only insights into ourselves - how we perceive, learn, remember, feel, believe and act - but also a new perspective of ourselves and our fellow human beings in the context of biological evolution.”
Abhijit Naskar, Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost

Abhijit Naskar
“Neuroscience in no longer simply the science of the nervous system. It is the actual empirical science of self-awareness.”
Abhijit Naskar

Abhijit Naskar
“​The universe perceives itself through us, or to be more specific, through our neurons.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Abhijit Naskar
“Genes come together to construct a magnificent life-form, while neurons come together to form our Illusion of Consciousness.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Abhijit Naskar
“Consciousness is simply the brain’s neural response to its surrounding environmental stimuli. Hence when the neural circuits malfunction, Consciousness tends to malfunction as well.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Abhijit Naskar
“Pathology can indeed evoke experiences of Absolute Godliness, but not all God experiences are caused by pathology. They can also occur due to disturbance in the geomagnetic field of our planet, consumption of psychedelics, excruciatingly extreme level of stress during a near- death situation, or ultimately through a natural and healthy procedure of meditation or/and prayer.”
Abhijit Naskar, Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost

Abhijit Naskar
“​I wanted to present Neuroscience to people in a way that would diminish their differences.”
Abhijit Naskar, Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost

Abhijit Naskar
“Neuroscience makes us connect with each other at an emotional level. It makes us make friends. It makes us dream more positively. It makes us more optimistic about ourselves and the world even in our darkest days. It makes us achieve our goal endowed with strength even through immense miseries. It allows us to attain the subjective reality of our fellow humans. Imbued with the understanding of the mind we can walk in the shoes of other people.”
Abhijit Naskar, Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost

Abhijit Naskar
“The lessons of relationship that our primordial ancestors learned are deeply encoded in the genetics of our neurobiological circuits of love. They are present from the moment we are born and activated at puberty by the cocktail of neurochemicals. It’s an elegant synchronized system. At first our brain weighs a potential partner, and if the person fits our ancestral wish list, we get a spike in the release of sex chemicals that makes us dizzy with a rush of unavoidable infatuation. It’s the first step down the primeval path of pair-bonding.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Oliver Sacks
“Our tests, our approaches...are ridiculously inadequate. They only show us deficits, they do not show us powers; they only show us puzzles and schemata, when we need to see music, narrative, play, a being conducting itself spontaneously in its own natural way.”
Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

Abhijit Naskar
“All our sentiments - religious, romantic or any other - are born in the neurons.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons of Jesus: Mind of A Teacher, Spouse & Thinker

Abhijit Naskar
“Memory is the binding foam of our mental life.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Abhijit Naskar
“What you today perceive as beautiful and special, over time, becomes not so special. That’s how the human brain works.”
Abhijit Naskar, The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality

Oliver Sacks
“What could we do? What should we do? 'There are no prescriptions,' Luria wrote, 'in a case like this. Do whatever your ingenuity and your heart suggest. There is little or no hope of any recovery in his memory. But a man does not consist of memory alone. He has feeling, will, sensibilities, moral being - matters of which neuropsychology cannot speak. And it is here, beyond the realm of an impersonal psychology, that you may find ways to touch him, and change him. [...] Neuropsychologically, there is little or nothing you can do; but in the realm of the Individual, there may be much you can do.”
Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

Abhijit Naskar
“Naturalism is the least subjective reality in this human world.”
Abhijit Naskar, Lord is My Sheep: Gospel of Human

Abhijit Naskar
“Memory is the coherence of life, that possesses all your emotions, and ambitions. Without it, your joyous as well as agonizing experiences of life won’t have any significance to you whatsoever.”
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Abhijit Naskar
“​God is hardwired within the neural circuitry.”
Abhijit Naskar, The God Parasite: Revelation of Neuroscience

“The association between the post-encephalitic syndrome and demyelination or incomplete myelination of the brain seems quite secure. And the fact that encephalitis -including that caused by vaccination- can cause demyelination has been known since the 1920's!”
Harris Coulter, Vaccination, Social Violence, and Criminality: The Medical Assault on the American Brain

“...epilepsijos metu būdavo viena stadija prieš pat priepuolį (jeigu tik priepuolis ištikdavo dar su sąmone), kada staiga, užėjus liūdesiui, dvasinei tamsai, slogumui, protarpiais tarytum įsiliepsnodavo jo smegenyse ir nepaprastai įsitempdavo iš karto visos jo gyvybinės galios. Gyvybės, sąmoningumo pojūtis beveik dešimteriopai padidėdavo tomis akimirkomis, kurios praeidavo kaip žaibas. Protas, širdis nutviksdavo nepaprasta šviesa; visas jo susijaudinimas, visos dvejonės, visas nerimas tarytum nuščiūdavo iš karto, ištirpdavo kažin kokioje aukštesnėje rimtyje, sklidinoje giedro, harmoningo džiaugsmo ir vilties, sklidinoje išminties bei galutinės priežasties. Bet tokie momentai, tie pragiedruliai tik pranašaudavo tą galutinę sekundę (niekuomet ne ilgiau nei vieną sekundę), kurią prasidėdavo pats priepuolis.”
Feodor Dostoevskij

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