Medication Quotes

Quotes tagged as "medication" Showing 1-30 of 86
Andrew Solomon
“Listen to the people who love you. Believe that they are worth living for even when you don't believe it. Seek out the memories depression takes away and project them into the future. Be brave; be strong; take your pills. Exercise because it's good for you even if every step weighs a thousand pounds. Eat when food itself disgusts you. Reason with yourself when you have lost your reason.”
Andrew Solomon, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

Carrie Fisher
“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you're living with this illness and functioning at all, it's something to be proud of, not ashamed of.
They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.”
Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking

John Green
“still, what could i say? that i didn't just feel depressed - instead, it was like the depression was the core of me, of every part of me, from my mind to my bones? that if he got blue, i got black? that i hated those pills so much, because i knew how much i relied on them to live?”
John Green, Will Grayson, Will Grayson

“Suddenly I wanted to get better. Mania wasn't fun anymore. It wasn't creative or visionary. It was mean parody at best, a cheap chemical trick. I needed to stop and get better. I'd take whatever they gave me, I pledged silently. I'd take Trilafon or Thorazine or whatever. I just wanted to sleep.”
David Lovelace, Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

“It's difficult. I take a low dose of lithium nightly. I take an antidepressant for my darkness because prayer isn't enough. My therapist hears confession twice a month, my shrink delivers the host, and I can stand in the woods and see the world spark.”
David Lovelace, Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

“I've been accustomed to mysteries, holy and otherwise, since I was a child. Some of us care for orphans, amass fortunes, raise protests or Nielsen ratings; some of us take communion or whiskey or poison. Some of us take lithium and antidepressants, and most everyone believes these pills are fundamentally wrong, a crutch, a sign of moral weakness, the surrender of art and individuality. Bullshit. Such thinking guarantees tradgedy for the bipolar. Without medicine, 20 percent of us, one in five, will commit suicide. Six-gun Russian roulette gives better odds. Denouncing these medicines makes as much sense as denouncing the immorality of motor oil. Without them, sooner or later the bipolar brain will go bang. I know plenty of potheads who sermonize against the pharmaceutical companies; I know plenty of born-again yoga instructors, plenty of missionaries who tell me I'm wrong about lithium. They don't have a clue.”
David Lovelace, Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

“Love is not enough. It takes courage to grab my father's demon, my own, or - God help me - my child's and strap it down and stop its mad jig; to sit in a row of white rooms filled with pills and clubbed dreamers and shout: stop smiling, shut up; shut up and stop laughing; you're sitting in hell. Stop preaching; stop weeping. You are a manic-depressive, always. your life is larger than most, unimaginable. You're blessed; just admit it and take the damn pill.”
David Lovelace, Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

Carrie Fisher
“I mean, that's at least in part why I ingested chemical waste - it was a kind of desire to abbreviate myself. To present the CliffNotes of the emotional me, as opposed to the twelve-column read.
I used to refer to my drug use as putting the monster in the box. I wanted to be less, so I took more - simple as that. Anyway, I eventually decided that the reason Dr. Stone had told me I was hypomanic was that he wanted to put me on medication instead of actually treating me. So I did the only rational thing I could do in the face of such as insult - I stopped talking to Stone, flew back to New York, and married Paul Simon a week later.”
Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking

William S. Burroughs
“You need a good bedside manner with doctors or you will get nowhere.”
William S. Burroughs, Junky

Vironika Tugaleva
“It is not depression or anxiety that truly hurts us. It is our active resistance against these states of mind and body. If you wake up with low energy, hopeless thoughts, and a lack of motivation - that is a signal from you to you. That is a sure sign that something in your mind or in your life is making you sick, and you must attend to that signal. But what do most people do? They hate their depressed feelings. They think "Why me?" They push them down. They take a pill. And so, the feelings return again and again, knocking at your door with a message while you turn up all the noise in your cave, refusing to hear the knocks. Madness. Open the door. Invite in depression. Invite anxiety. Invite self-hatred. Invite shame. Hear their message. Give them a hug. Accept their tirades as exaggerated mistruths typical of any upset person. Love your darkness and you shall know your light.”
Vironika Tugaleva

“I now know for certain that my mind and emotions, my fix on the real and my family's well-being, depend on just a few grams of salt. But treatment's the easy part. Without honesty, without a true family reckoning, that salt's next to worthless.”
David Lovelace, Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

Jen Lancaster
“Ambien might have mentally just tossed my salad. WITH CROUTONS.”
Jen Lancaster

Robert  Whitaker
“If you expand the boundaries of mental illness, which is clealry what has happened in this country during the past twenty-five years, and you treat the people so diagnosed with psychiatric medications, do you run the risk of turning an anger-ridden teenager into a lifelong mental patient? (p. 30)”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

Dennis Lehane
“...someday..., we'll medicate human experience right out of the human experience.”
Dennis Lehane, Shutter Island

“I was coming down off the last painkiller left in my dresser drawer after Autumn tossed my stash. In that moment I was so groggy and happy I would have accepted a date with Oscar the Grouch - and planned to do some serious feeling up on the green furry beast too. Yeah, stooping to pharmaceutical-inspired sex fantasies about garbage can Sesame Street characters - that had to be the best Just Say No drug lecture a girl in a leg cast could ever receive to make her go cold turkey off the meds.”
Rachel Cohn, Cupcake

Larry Godwin
“At those times when I’m weak, needy, and depressed, I must remember there’s someone who feels worse. To that person, I would appear whole.”
Larry Godwin, Transcending Depression: Quest Without a Compass

Ocean Vuong
“The say addiction might be linked to bipolar disorder. It's the chemicals in our brains, they say. I got the wrong chemicals, Ma. Or rather, I don't get enough of one or the other. They have a pill for it. They have an industry. They make millions. Did you know people get rich off of sadness? I want to meet the millionaire of American sadness. I want to look him in the eye, shake his hand, and say, 'it's been an honor to serve my country.”
Ocean Vuong, On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

Henry David Thoreau
“Give me the poverty that enjoys true wealth.”
Henry David Thoreau

Robert  Whitaker
“...all I could think about was how both sets of parents had needed to make their decision, on whether to medicate their child, in a scientific vacuum. (p. 35)”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

Kelli Jae Baeli
“Irony of the day: arthritis medication with a cap that old people can't get off, because of their arthritis.”
Kelli Jae Baeli

John Green
“There is something intensely weird and upsetting about the notion that you can only become yourself by ingesting a medication that changes your self.”
John Green, Turtles All the Way Down

Bobby Hall
“They are finding solace in substances. But the truth is, if they just dealt with their issues in the first place, then they wouldn't need to self-medicate.”
Bobby Hall, Supermarket

Anna Whateley
“My heart beats too loudly at the change in plans.
Changes happen sometimes; they aren’t always a bad thing. I grip my coffee cup and wriggle my toes. I can do this, the coffee says; of course you can, the meds reply.”
Anna Whateley, Peta Lyre’s Rating Normal

John Green
“(...) yo intentaba explicarle que hay algo enormemente extraño y triste en la idea de que solo puedes llegar a ser tú mismo ingiriendo una medicación que cambia tu yo.”
John Green, Turtles All the Way Down

Karl Kristian Flores
“A friend will soothe, like a cough drop smooth,
Making the symptoms of our condition not so bad.
You will soothe me, like a cough drop thick,
Making the pain go away while I'm still sick.
There's nothing we can do to close our interval,
But celebrate your flavor that makes a sore life bearable.”
Karl Kristian Flores, Can I Tell You Something?

Herman Koch
“I looked at her face. Besides being covered in tears, it was above all marked by dissatisfaction. Deep-lying dissatisfaction, the kind a person is born with. Nothing helps to drive out that dissatisfaction. Expensive espresso machines, attention, a new wing on the house— for a fleeting moment the dissatisfaction disappears into the background, but it's like a leak coming through the wallpaper: You can cover it with new wallpaper, but after a while the brown spots soak through, anyway. There's not much you can do about it. You can muffle it for a bit with medication, with what they call “mother’s little helpers,” but in the end it only comes back with renewed strength.”
Herman Koch, Summer House with Swimming Pool

“High-quality medication and swift access to treatment must be provided to all free of cost. There should be no difference in the treatment recieved by the high-powered and the weakest in the state.”
Shivanshu K. Srivastava

David Smail
“It is also true, however, that many patients experience psychotropic medication as in itself a further source of confusion and discomfort, since it may alter their perception of the world in an idiosyncratic way, so that their experience seems to bear no relation to the meaning of actual events of their world.”
David Smail, Illusion & Reality: The Meaning of Anxiety

Margot Berwin
Digitoxin
(sometimes referred to as digitoxin or digitalis)


This widely used heart medication is a cardiac glycoside used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and congestive heart failure. Found in the lovely purple bells of the foxglove plant and the gorgeous, velvety black wings of the monarch butterfly, digoxin is probably the most beautiful medication there ever was.

Margot Berwin, Hothouse Flower and the Nine Plants of Desire

Margot Berwin
Lily of the Valley
(Convallaria majalis)


Lily of the valley is known to slow the disturbed action of a weak and irritable heart, while at the same time increasing its power. As a heart medication, it is sometimes preferable to the digitalis made from the foxglove plant, because it is less toxic and does not accumulate in the blood. Lily of the valley has one of the most sexual scents of all plants and is widely used in perfume. No wonder it causes the heart to beat stronger.

Margot Berwin, Hothouse Flower and the Nine Plants of Desire

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