Chronic Pain Quotes

Quotes tagged as "chronic-pain" (showing 1-30 of 64)
George Orwell
“Of pain you could wish only one thing: that it should stop. Nothing in the world was so bad as physical pain. In the face of pain there are no heroes.”
George Orwell, 1984

Emm Roy
“Mental illness

People assume you aren’t sick
unless they see the sickness on your skin
like scars forming a map of all the ways you’re hurting.

My heart is a prison of Have you tried?s
Have you tried exercising? Have you tried eating better?
Have you tried not being sad, not being sick?
Have you tried being more like me?
Have you tried shutting up?

Yes, I have tried. Yes, I am still trying,
and yes, I am still sick.

Sometimes monsters are invisible, and
sometimes demons attack you from the inside.
Just because you cannot see the claws and the teeth
does not mean they aren’t ripping through me.
Pain does not need to be seen to be felt.

Telling me there is no problem
won’t solve the problem.

This is not how miracles are born.
This is not how sickness works.”
Emm Roy, The First Step

Marcia Angell
“Few things a doctor does are more important than relieving pain. . . pain is soul destroying. No patient should have to endure intense pain unnecessarily. The quality of mercy is essential to the practice of medicine; here, of all places, it should not be strained.”
Marcia Angell

Alison Lurie
“Having a chronic illness, Molly thought, was like being invaded. Her grandmother back in Michigan used to tell about the day one of their cows got loose and wandered into the parlor, and the awful time they had getting her out. That was exactly what Molly's arthritis was like: as if some big old cow had got into her house and wouldn't go away. It just sat there, taking up space in her life and making everything more difficult, mooing loudly from time to time and making cow pies, and all she could do really was edge around it and put up with it.

When other people first became aware of the cow, they expressed concern and anxiety. They suggested strategies for getting the animal out of Molly's parlor: remedies and doctors and procedures, some mainstream and some New Age. They related anecdotes of friends who had removed their own cows in one way or another. But after a while they had exhausted their suggestions. Then they usually began to pretend that the cow wasn't there, and they preferred for Molly to go along with the pretense.”
Alison Lurie, The Last Resort

“The trouble with chronic pain is that it is so easy to become accustomed to it, both mentally and physically. At first it's absolutely agonizing; it's the only thing you think about, like a rock in your shoe that rubs your foot raw with every step. Then the constant rubbing, the pain and the limp all become part of the status quo, the occasional stabbing pain just a reminder.
You are so set to endure, hunched against it - and when it starts to ease, you don't really notice, until the absence washes over you like a balm.”
Robert J. Wiersema

“If your body is screaming in pain, whether the pain is muscular contractions, anxiety, depression, asthma or arthritis, a first step in releasing the pain may be making the connection between your body pain and the cause. “Beliefs are physical. A thought held long enough and repeated enough becomes a belief. The belief then becomes biology.”
Marilyn Van Derbur, Miss America by Day

Jennifer Starzec
“I often wished that more people understood the invisible side of things. Even the people who seemed to understand, didn't really.”
Jennifer Starzec, Determination

Jennifer Starzec
“People who don't see you every day have a hard time understanding how on some days--good days--you can run three miles, but can barely walk across the parking lot on other days,' [my mom] said quietly.”
Jennifer Starzec, Determination

Melissa Cady
“The erosion of an effective patient-physician relationship has no place when dealing with chronic pain. Worst of all, dismissing the patient's pain is as devastating as crushing a patient's hope.”
Melissa Cady, Paindemic: A Practical and Holistic Look at Chronic Pain, the Medical System, and the antiPAIN Lifestyle

“If I only could explain
How much I miss
that precious moment
when I was free
from the shackles of chronic pain.”
Jenni Johanna Toivonen

“Somewhere inside that hurting body, there is something better, something stronger, something real.”
R. M. Drake

Robin Talley
“Lily had lived with the same pain for so long it felt like a part of her. The worst days, though, were when the pain was different. When it came faster, or harsher, or fiercer than she was used to. When it prickled instead of throbbed. When it attacked her right ankle instead of her left knee. When it woke her up at night instead of aching dully first thing in the morning. On those days, her standard-issue pain was replaced by something different and frightening, something that took over her body and left her without the slightest clue of when, or even if, it would release her.

Those times, her pain wasn’t a part of her anymore. Those times, she was a part of it.”
Robin Talley, As I Descended

Sometimes, this disapproval of how you are managing your pain crosses over to disbelief that
“Sometimes, this disapproval of how you are managing your pain crosses over to disbelief that you are in as much pain as you say you are. They don’t believe that your pain is a legitimate enough reason to rest or nap or cry or take narcotic medications or not go to work or to go to the doctor. They might think that you are making too big of a deal out of it. They doubt the legitimacy of the pain itself.

This kind of stigma is the source of the dreaded accusation that chronic pain is “all in your head.” It’s as if to say that you are making a mountain out of a molehill.”
Murray J. McAlister

“Since my symptoms began 13 years ago, I’ve tried every form of pain management I could access — NSAIDS, nonopioid analgesics, neurologic medications, acupuncture, laser therapy, physical therapy, prolotherapy, massage, and trigger-point injections. Most of these have been unhelpful; others provide temporary relief, often at great expense. At the end of the day, when my body is fully depleted of its resources and in the most pain, a single dose of Percocet is the only tool that silences the pain enough for me to fall asleep.

I honestly don’t know what I’d do if Percocet became unavailable to me, and the very thought scares me. I’ve been taking it for five years. To avoid any chance of addiction, I only take it at night and have stayed on a consistently low dose.”
Michael Bihovsky

Bernard Cornwell
“I'm in pain all the time,' I said, 'and if I gave into it then I'd do nothing.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Empty Throne

“We have a genuine and devastating epidemic of opiate abuse in this country, and it is of critical importance that this problem be addressed. But we must do so in a way that doesn’t cut off an effective (and often the only) treatment for the chronically ill, many of whom are able to function in this world at all only because of the small respite that responsible opiate use provides.”
Michael Bihovsky

“The stigma of chronic pain is one of the most difficult aspects of living with chronic pain. If you have chronic pain, people can sometimes judge you for it. Specifically, they can sometimes disapprovingly judge you for how you are coping with it. If you rest or nap because of the pain, they think you rest or nap too much. If they catch you crying, they become impatient and think you cry too much. If you don’t work because of the pain, you face scrutiny over why you don’t. If you go to your healthcare provider, they ask, “Are you going to the doctor again?” Maybe, they think that you take too many medications. In any of these ways, they disapprove of how you are coping with pain. These disapproving judgments are the stigma of living with chronic pain.”
Murray J. McAlister

“A common misconception is that some people are only in pain because they are weak, anxious, depressed, or do not deal well with stress. This is not correct.
Every experience you have — touch, warmth, itch, pain — is created by the brain and thus is all in your head, but it does not mean they are not real.

Things like fear, anxiety, or depression can increase pain levels and can increase the chance of persistent pain. But often, these feelings only develop after a person already has chronic pain.”
Tasha Stanton

“What a person did when they were in pain said a lot about them.

pg 459”
Veronics Roth

Cindee Snider Re
“Surrender is an incredibly difficult topic in light of chronic illness, because loss is often continued and sustained.”
Cindee Snider Re, Finding Purpose: Rediscovering Meaning in a Life with Chronic Illness

“Sometimes I wonder how I could have been so oblivious to the fact that proper treatment for pain is, well, not a bad thing.”
Anna Hamilton

Alison Moore
“I currently take Lortab, which is a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone. I’d rather not take this medication, or any medication for that matter, but it is the only one that controls my pain adequately enough to allow me to function on a daily basis... I take the smallest dose possible to enable me to remain as clear-headed as possible to do what I need to do each day...

Even with the minimal opioids I take, I still have pain all the time, 24 hours a day; without opioids, life would be torture.”
Alison Moore

Cindee Snider Re
“In the midst of pain, we begin to understand the price Jesus paid for our salvation.”
Cindee Snider Re, Discovering Hope: Beginning the Journey Toward Hope in Chronic Illness

“Government agencies are trying to get doctors to cut back on prescribing opioids. I understand that they need to do something about the epidemic of overdoses. However, labeling everyone as addicts, including those who responsibly take opioids for chronic pain, is not the answer. If the proposed changes take effect, they would force physicians to neglect their patients. Moreover, legitimate pain patients, like myself, would be left in agony on a daily basis.”
Alison Moore,

Cindee Snider Re
“Our circumstances might be abject, we might not think we can survive for one more day enslaved to illness, but God says, "My Presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.”
Cindee Snider Re, Finding Purpose: Rediscovering Meaning in a Life with Chronic Illness

Dan Mager
“Deepening awareness and nonjudgmental acceptance of one’s thoughts fosters a new relationship with them, creating the space to purposefully shift mental focus away from the ruminative thought patterns that pave the road to suffering.”
Dan Mager, Some Assembly Required: A Balanced Approach to Recovery from Addiction and Chronic Pain

Kathleen Turner
“Appearing nude on film was not easy when I was twenty-six in Body Heat; it was even harder when I was forty-six in The Graduate, on the stage, which is more up close and personal than film. After my middle-age nude scene, though, I unexpectedly got letters from women saying, "I have not undressed in front of my husband in ten years and I'm going to tonight." Or, "I have not looked in the mirror at my body and you gave me permission."
These affirmations from other women were especially touching to me because when I began The Graduate I'd just come through a period when I felt a great loss of confidence, when my rheumatoid arthritis hit me hard and I literally couldn't walk or do any of the things that I was so used to doing. It used to be that if I said to my body, "Leap across the room now," it would leap instantly. I don't know how I did it, but I did it. I hadn't realized how much my confidence was based on my physicality. On my ability to make my body do whatever I wanted it to do.
I was so consumed, not just by thinking about what I could and couldn't do, but also by handling the pain, the continual, chronic pain. I didn't realize how pain colored my whole world and how depressive it was. Before I was finally able to control my RA with proper medications, I truly had thought that my attractiveness and my ability to be attractive to men was gone, was lost. So for me to come back and do The Graduate was an affirmation to myself. I had my body back. I was back.”
Kathleen Turner, Send Yourself Roses: Thoughts on My Life, Love, and Leading Roles

Cindee Snider Re
“He spoke three simple sentences and I understood why my injuries are permanent. Every hard moment, all the pain, had prepared me to walk beside my son. In a heartbeat, it was worth it. A decade later, it still is.”
Cindee Snider Re, Finding Purpose: Rediscovering Meaning in a Life with Chronic Illness

“If I only could explain
how much I miss
that precious moment when I was free
from the shackles of chronic pain.”
J.J.Toivonen

“If I only could explain
how much I miss
that precious moment when I was free
from the shackles of chronic pain.”
J. J. Toivonen

« previous 1 3
All Quotes | My Quotes | Add A Quote