Ruling Class Quotes

Quotes tagged as "ruling-class" Showing 1-30 of 30
James Connolly
“It would be well to realize that the talk of ‘humane methods of warfare’, of the ‘rules of civilized warfare’, and all such homage to the finer sentiments of the race are hypocritical and unreal, and only intended for the consumption of stay-at-homes. There are no humane methods of warfare, there is no such thing as civilized warfare; all warfare is inhuman, all warfare is barbaric; the first blast of the bugles of war ever sounds for the time being the funeral knell of human progress… What lover of humanity can view with anything but horror the prospect of this ruthless destruction of human life. Yet this is war: war for which all the jingoes are howling, war to which all the hopes of the world are being sacrificed, war to which a mad ruling class would plunge a mad world.”
James Connolly

Alice Walker
“Those in power must spend a lot of their time laughing at us.”
Alice Walker

George Orwell
“England is the most class-ridden country under the sun. It is a land of snobbery and privilege, ruled largely by the old and silly.”
George Orwell, Why I Write

George Orwell
“The essence of oligarchical rule is not father-to-son inheritance, but the persistence of a certain world-view and a certain way of life ... A ruling group is a ruling group so long as it can nominate its successors ... Who wields power is not important, provided that the hierarchical structure remains always the same.”
George Orwell

Édouard Louis
“Among those who have everything, I have never seen a family go to the seashore just to celebrate a political decision, because for them politics changes almost nothing. This is something I realized when I went to live in Paris, far away from you: the ruling class may complain about a left-wing government, they may complain about a right-wing government, but no government ever ruins their digestion, no government ever breaks their backs, no government ever inspires a trip to the beach. Politics never changes their lives, at least not much. What’s strange, too, is that they’re the ones who engage in politics, though it has almost no effect on their lives. For the ruling class, in general, politics is a question of aesthetics: a way of seeing themselves, of seeing the world, of constructing a personality. For us it was life or death.”
Édouard Louis, Qui a tué mon père

Gore Vidal
“I say, they [those at the top] don't have to conspire, because they all think alike. The president of General Motors and the president of Chase Manhattan Bank really are not going to disagree much on anything, nor would the editor of the New York Times disagree with them. They all tend to think quite alike, otherwise they would not be in those jobs.”
Gore Vidal

Michael Parenti
“The very concept of "revolutionary violence" is somewhat falsely cast, since most of the violence comes from those who attempt to prevent reform, not from those struggling for reform. By focusing on the violent rebellions of the downtrodden, we overlook the much greater repressive force and violence utilized by the ruling oligarchs to maintain the status quo, including armed attacks against peaceful demonstrations, mass arrests, torture, destruction of opposition organizations, suppression of dissident publications, death squad assassinations, the extermination of whole villages, and the like.”
Michael Parenti, Blackshirts and Reds: Rational Fascism and the Overthrow of Communism

Michael Parenti
“History teaches us that all ruling elites try to portray themselves as the natural and durable social order, even ones that are in serious crisis, that threaten to devour their environmental base in order to continually recreate their hierarchical structure of power and privilege. And all ruling elites are scornful and intolerant of alternative viewpoints.”
Michael Parenti, Blackshirts and Reds: Rational Fascism and the Overthrow of Communism

Frank Herbert
“We are plagued by a corrupt polity which promotes unlawful and/or immoral behaviour. Public interest has no practical significance in everyday behaviour among the ruling factions. The real problems of our world are not being confronted by those in power. In the guise of public service, they use whatever comes to hand for personal gain. They are insane with and for power.”
Frank Herbert, The Dosadi Experiment

Sam Mbah
“The existence of the state and the manipulation of the structures and institutions of the state by the ruling elite for the (mis)allocation and (mal)distribution of public goods and services inevitably leads to corrupt practices.”
Sam Mbah, African Anarchism: The History of a Movement

Βασίλης Ραφαηλίδης
“Κάθε μικροαστός ονειρεύεται τον αστό που ζεσταίνει μέσα του, που τον μεγαλώνει στο θερμοκήπιο της μεγάλης ελπίδας για ένα πέρασμα στην «ανώτερη τάξη». Κάθε ψιλικατζής ονειρεύεται ένα σούπερ μάρκετ. Και επειδή το όνειρο για μερικούς πραγματοποιείται, όλοι οι χάχες πιστεύουν πως θα βγει αληθινό και γι’ αυτούς. Δεν έχει σημασία που οι περισσότεροι πεθαίνουν φτωχοί. Σημασία έχει που ο καπιταλισμός τους επιτρέπει να ονειρεύονται το δικό τους πλούτο. Και ο φασισμός, που είναι η ακραία μορφή καπιταλισμού, είναι μια εγγύηση για τη διατήρηση του ονείρου”
Βασίλης Ραφαηλίδης, Ιστορία (κωμικοτραγική) του νεοελληνικού κράτους, 1830-1974

Dean Cavanagh
“The ultimate goal of the political elite is to privatize the air. So as not to destroy their own edifice of democratic compassion they will make provisions for the sick and the poor. Air will be rationed by a privatized bureaucracy and only those who complete a series of stringent means tests will be allowed to breath freely. If this sounds like untenable dystopian sci-fi, you haven’t been paying attention. In the 17th century Dean Jonathon Swift satirically proposed that the impoverished Irish might ease their economic troubles by selling their children as food for rich gentlemen and ladies. Many Lords in Westminster at the time took this as a sign that an Irish voice was finally speaking sense. The descendants of these Lords still stalk the corridors of power today. Never underestimate the callousness or the hereditary madness of the ruling class.”
Dean Cavanagh

Perry Anderson
“Structurally, by reason of their smaller numbers and greater resources, virtually all ruling classes enjoy an advantage over the ruled in their capacity for collective action. Their internal lines of communication are more compact; their wealth offers an all-purpose medium of power, convertible into any number of forms of domination; their intelligence systems scan the political landscape from a greater height. More numerous and more dispersed, less equipped materially, less armed culturally, subordinate classes always tend, in the sociologist Michael Mann’s phrase, to be ‘organisationally outflanked'.”
Perry Anderson, The Indian Ideology

Majid Kazmi
“Our minds become slaves to those we see as having total power to control us and to cause pain to us. We are quick to give up control of ourselves to those who have the power to rule us as long as they also have the power to feed us. This is the fundamental construct of a feudal society.”
Majid Kazmi, The First Dancer: How to be the first among equals and attract unlimited opportunities

Donald J. Trump
“Socialism is not about the environment. It’s not about justice. It’s not about virtue. Socialism is about only one thing. It’s called power for the ruling class. That’s what it is.”
Donald Trump

Βασίλης Ραφαηλίδης
“Είναι ανόητος όποιος πιστεύει πως τα αφεντικά είναι καλύτερα ή χειρότερα ανάλογα με το τι Θεό πιστεύουν. Ένας είναι ο Θεός των αφεντικών, το χρήμα.”
Βασίλης Ραφαηλίδης, Οι λαοί της Μέσης Ανατολής

“Every leader attracts a different type of follower from the left or the right, from the lowest or the highest class. Every leader unwittingly attracts certain stereotypes that fuel their underlying agenda.”
Anita B. Sulser PhD, We Are One

“Capitalists believe they can take everything at the table as belonging to them. Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class.”
Al Capone

Arnold Hauser
“Aristocracy in general does not favour individualism; it bases its claim to privilege upon virtues which are common to the whole class or at least to whole clans.”
Arnold Hauser, The Social History of Art, Volume 1: From Prehistoric Times to the Middle Ages

Édouard Louis
“your back had been mangled by the factory, mangled by the life you were forced to live, by the life that wasn’t yours, that wasn’t yours because you never got to live a life of your own, because you lived on the outskirts of your life — because of all that you stayed at home, and usually they were the ones who came over.”
Édouard Louis, Qui a tué mon père

Christopher Lasch
“The notion that egalitarian purposes could be served by the "restoration" of upward mobility betrayed a fundamental misunderstanding. High rates of mobility are by no means inconsistent with a system of stratification that concentrates power and privilege in a ruling elite. Indeed, the circulation of elites strengthens the principle of hierarchy, furnishing elites with fresh talent and legitimating their ascendancy as
a function of merit rather than birth.”
Christopher Lasch, The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy

“Wars have been waged over millions of square miles, significantly larger than the British Empire at its peak. Historically, Islamic conquests stretched from southern France to the Philippines, from Austria to Nigeria, and from central Asia to New Guinea. The Muslim goal was to have a central government, first at Damascus, and then at Baghdad, later at Cairo, Istanbul, and other imperial centres. The local governors, judges, and other rulers were appointed by the central imperial authorities for far off colonies. Islamic law was introduced as the senior law, whether or not wanted by the local people. Arabic was introduced as the rulers’ language, while the local languages frequently disappeared. Then, two classes of residents were established. The native residents paid a tax that their rulers did not have to pay. In each case, these laws allowed the local conquered people less freedom than was given to Muslims.”
Anita B. Sulser PhD, We Are One

جلجامش نبيل, Gilgamesh Nabeel
“الشعور الديني أو القومي يتصاعد في أوقات المحن التي يشعر فيها أتباع تلك الأديان أو القوميات بالتهديد، هنالك قلة تنبذ المسألة برمتها لتتخلص من التهمة، ولكن الأغلبية تزداد تمسكاً بهويتها، وتعتبرها عنصراً من عناصر بقائها وقوتها. أدركت في تلك المرحلة، بأن الشعور الديني مجرد هوية تتراخى وتقوى وفقاً للظروف، وغالباً ما تكون الفئات المقموعة هي الأكثر تمسكاً بهويتها من أجل الحفاظ عليها، فيما تتراخى مثل تلك المشاعر تدريجاً لدى أتباع الفئات الحاكمة.”
جلجامش نبيل, Gilgamesh Nabeel, صراع الأقنعة

جلجامش نبيل, Gilgamesh Nabeel
“في العادة تتبع الفئات المستفيدة هوى الحاكم، وتعارض الفئات المضطهدة سياساته بوسائل شتى.”
جلجامش نبيل, Gilgamesh Nabeel, صراع الأقنعة

Édouard Louis
“September 2017 Emmanuel Macron condemns the “laziness” of those in France who, according to him, are blocking his reforms. You’ve always known that this word is reserved for people like you, people who can’t work because they live too far from large towns, who can’t find work because they were driven out of the educational system too soon, without a diploma, who can’t work anymore because life in the factory has mangled their back. We don’t use the word lazy to describe a boss who sits in an office all day ordering other people around. We’d never say that. When I was little, you were always saying, obsessively, I’m not lazy, because you knew this insult hung over you, like a specter you wished to exorcize.”
Édouard Louis, Qui a tué mon père

Édouard Louis
“Macron, Hollande, Valls, El Khomri, Hirsch, Sarkozy, Bertrand, Chirac. The history of your suffering bears these names. Your life story is the history of one person after another beating you down. The history of your body is the history of these names, one after another, destroying you. The history of your body stands as an accusation against political history”
Édouard Louis, Qui a tué mon père

Marge Piercy
“There is an attitude that has developed since about the 1890s that attempts to cast all politics and sociology out of poetry. I don't understand how anyone can seriously maintain this attitude. Actually, the attitude itself is political. Art which embodies the ideals of the ruling class in society isn't conceived as being political, and is simply judged by how well it is done. Art which contains ideas which threaten the position of that ruling class is silenced by critics: it is political, they say, and not art.”
Marge Piercy, Parti-Colored Blocks for a Quilt

Christopher Lasch
“Ruling classes have always sought to instill in their subordinates the capacity to experience exploitation and material deprivation as guilt, while deceiving themselves that their own material interests coincide with those of mankind as a whole.”
Christopher Lasch, The Culture of Narcissism: American Life in An Age of Diminishing Expectations

Frédéric Lordon
“Ce sont toujours les dominants qui fixent le niveau de la violence dans l'histoire.”
Frédéric Lordon, Vivre sans ?

Gaetano Mosca
“Page 118
As social organization progresses and the governing class begins to reap the benefits of an improved bureaucratic machine, its superiority in culture and wealth, and especially its better organization and firmer cohesion, may compensate to some extent for the lack of individual energy; and so it may come about that considerable portions of the governing class, especially the circles that give the society its intellectual tone and direction, lose the habit of dealing with people of the lower classes and command them directly. This state of affairs generally enables frivolousness, and a sort of culture that is wholly abstract and conventional, to supplant a vivid sense of realities and a sound and accurate knowledge of human nature. Thinking loses virility. Sentimental and exaggeratedly humanitarian theories come to the fore, theories that proclaim the innate goodness of men, especially when they are not spoiled by civilization, or theories that uphold the absolute preferableness, in the arts of government, of gentle and persuasive means to severe authoritarian measures. People imagine, as Taine puts it, that since social life has flowed blandly and smoothly on for centuries, like an impetuous river confined withing sturdy dikes, the dikes have become superfluous and can readily be dispensed with, now that the river has learned its lesson.

… It would seem therefore that there is a frequent, if not a universal, tendency in very mature civilizations, where ruling classes have acquired highly refined literary cultures, to wax enthusiastic, by a sort of antithesis, over the simple ways of savages, barbarians and peasants (the case of Arcadia!), and to clothe them with all sorts of virtues and sentiments that are as stereotyped as they are imaginary. Invariably underlying all such tendencies is the concept that was so aptly phrased by Rousseau, that man is good by nature but spoiled by society and civilization. This notion has had a very great influence on political thinking during the past hundred and fifty years.

… certain it is that when the ruling class has degenerated in the manner described, it loses its ability to provide against its own dangers and against those of the society that has the misfortune to be guided by it. So the state crashes at the first appreciable shock from the outside foe. Those who govern are unable to deal with the least flurry; and the changes that a strong and intelligent ruling class would have carried out at a negligible cost in wealth, blood and human dignity take on the proportions of a social cataclysm.”
Gaetano Mosca, The Ruling Class