Poetics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "poetics" Showing 1-30 of 41
William Wordsworth
“What is a Poet? He is a man speaking to men: a man, it is true, endued with more lively sensibility, more enthusiasm and tenderness, who has a greater knowledge of human nature, and a more comprehensive soul, than are supposed to be common among mankind; a man pleased with his own passions and volitions, and who rejoices more than other men in the spirit of life that is in him; delighting to contemplate similar volitions and passions as manifested in the goings-on of the universe, and habitually impelled to create them where he does not find them.”
William Wordsworth

André Breton
“Un mot et tout est perdu, un mot et tout est sauvé.”
Andre Breton

Jack Kerouac
“The unspeakable visions of the individual.”
Jack Kerouac

Stephen Dunn
“All good poems are victories over something.”
Stephen Dunn

Roman Payne
“I used to be a poet.
My words were traded in marketplaces like pieces of gold.
Merchants bought my verses for as much as they paid for saffron and Indian jade.

Now I am old...
drunk on wine and candle fumes.
Alone in this barren room, I speak my psalms to the night air
so as to entertain moths before they go off to die.
I used to be a poet
and my words were gold.”
Roman Payne

“There is no single thing... that is so cut and dried that one cannot attend to its secret whisper which says 'I am more than just my appearance'. If each object quivers with readiness to imply something other than itself, if each perception is a word in a poem dense with connotations, then the poet's selection of any given subject of speculation will become... a means of attuning himself to the rhythms and harmonies of reality at large. ... The notion of a network of correspondence is not an outmoded Romantic illusion: it represents a crucial intuition...”
Roger Cardinal, Figures of Reality

Northrop Frye
“The genuine artist, Harris is saying, finds reality in a point of identity between subject and object, a point at which the created world and the world that is really there become the same thing. [p.211]”
Northrop Frye, The Bush Garden

Human beings, in a sense, may be thought of as multidimensional creatures composed of such
“Human beings, in a sense, may be thought of as multidimensional creatures composed of such poetic considerations as the individual need
for self-realization, subdued passions for overwhelming beauty, and a hunger for meaning beyond the flavors that enter and exit the physical body.”
Aberjhani, Splendid Literarium: A Treasury of Stories, Aphorisms, Poems, and Essays

Alicia Suskin Ostriker
“With women poets we look at or into, but not up at, sacred things; we unlearn submission.”
Alicia Ostriker, Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America

Alicia Suskin Ostriker
“To Wallace Stevens' post-Nietzschean formula 'God and the imagination are one,' these women poets would add a crucial third element: God and the imagination and my body are one.”
Alicia Ostriker, Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America

Edmond Jabès
“[W]andering creates the desert.”
Edmond Jabès

Theodore Roethke
“It’s your privilege to find me incomprehensible. I gave you my minutes; let them remain ours. I hope I haunt you.”
Theodore Roethke, Straw for the Fire: From the Notebooks of Theodore Roethke

Marcel Proust
“Poets claim that we recapture for a moment the self that we were long ago when we enter some house or garden in which we used to live in our youth. But these are most hazardous pilgrimages, which end as often in disappointment as in success. It is in ourselves that we should rather seek to find those fixed places, contemporaneous with different years. And great fatigue followed by a good night's rest can to a certain extent help us to do so. For in order to make us descend into the most subterranean galleries of sleep, where no reflexion from overnight, no gleam of memory comes to light up the interior monologue—if the latter does not itself cease—fatigue followed by rest will so thoroughly turn over the soil and penetrate the bedrock of our bodies that we discover down there, where our muscles plunge and twist in their ramifications and breathe in new life, the garden where we played in our childhood. There is no need to travel in order to see it again; we must dig down inwardly to discover it. What once covered the earth is no longer above but beneath it; a mere excursion does not suffice for a visit to the dead city: excavation is necessary also. But we shall see how certain fugitive and fortuitous impressions carry us back even more effectively to the past, with a more delicate precision, with a more light-winged, more immaterial, more headlong, more unerring, more immortal flight, than these organic dislocations.”
Marcel Proust, The Guermantes Way

Annie Finch
“the next time you hear someone in a workshop remarking on how good a particular free-verse line or passage sounds, scan it. The odds are that it will fall into a regular metrical pattern.”
Annie Finch

Milan Kundera
“The novel has accompanied man uninterruptedly and faithfully since the beginning of the Modern Era. It was then that the "passion to know," which Husserl considered the essence of European spirituality, seized the novel and led it to scrutinize man's concrete life and protect it against "the forgetting of being"; to hold "the world of life" under a permanent light. That is the sense in which I understand and share Hermann Broch's insistence in repeating: The sole raison d'etre of a novel is to discover what only the novel can discover. A novel that does not discover a hitherto unknown segment of existence is immoral. Knowledge is the novel's only morality.”
Milan Kundera, The Art of the Novel

Gaston Bachelard
“In my Paris apartment, when a neighbor drives nails into the wall at an undue hour, I "naturalize" the noise by imagining that I am in my house in Dijon, where I have a garden. And finding everything I hear quite natural, I say to myself: "That's my woodpecker at work in the acacia tree." This is my method for obtaining calm when things disturb me.”
Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

R.M. Engelhardt
“Poetry Is The Language Of Mysticism &
Discourse. It Is The Whisper In The Dark,
The Shadow In The Light. Poetry Is An Incantation From The Depths Of Your Very Soul.”
R.M. Engelhardt, The Resurrection Waltz Poems R.M. Engelhardt

Alicia Suskin Ostriker
“The appropriation of the creativity-procreativity metaphor by women is a conscious challenge to traditional poetics and beyond that to traditional metaphysics, for the gynocentric vision is not that Logos condescends to incarnate itself, but that Flesh becomes Word.”
Alicia Ostriker, Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America

J.D. McClatchy
“The very conventions of poetry were devised to encode experience, to make it less obvious and thereby more true. To make a metaphor, after all, is to describe something in terms of what it is not, the better to apprehend what it is.”
J.D. McClatchy, Love Speaks Its Name: Gay and Lesbian Love Poems

“(She catches sight of herself in the mirror. Go in fear of hyperbole)”
Ann Lauterbach, The Night Sky: Writings on the Poetics of Experience

Charles Bernstein
“The poetry is not in speaking to the dead but listening to the dead.”
Charles Bernstein

Gaston Bachelard
“It is also a terrible trait of men that they should be incapable of understanding the forces of the universe intuitively, otherwise than in terms of a psychology of wrath.”
Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

Aristotle
“Poetry is more philosophical and more serious than history; poetry utters universal truths, history particular statements.”
Aristotle

R.M. Engelhardt
“The sonnet, a lyrical poem, the beauty and magic... convey with our hearts the truth of the universe in a single moment briefly.”
R.M. Engelhardt

Boris Pasternak
“Não gosto dos justos, dos que nunca caíram, que não recuaram. A virtude deles é morta, sem valor. A beleza da vida não foi revelada para eles.”
Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago

Srikanth Reddy
“Each week, I plan an assignment. Students, interrogate form down to the last comma. Students, broadcast the crimes of history.
Srikanth Reddy, Voyager

“Unlike essayists whom write primarily to understand complex situations or convince other people of the righteousness of their opinions, poets strive to stir memories, provoke feelings, and evoke emotions. Poets do not write to reach that exalted perch where logic replaces feelings. Poets write about the connective tissue that makes us human, the poignant remembrances, hopes, fears, and emotions of humankind. It is not our ability to think standing alone that makes us human, but a mélange of incongruous feelings, emotional tidings that are virtually inexpressible.”
Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

Marge Piercy
“There is an attitude that has developed since about the 1890s that attempts to cast all politics and sociology out of poetry. I don't understand how anyone can seriously maintain this attitude. Actually, the attitude itself is political. Art which embodies the ideals of the ruling class in society isn't conceived as being political, and is simply judged by how well it is done. Art which contains ideas which threaten the position of that ruling class is silenced by critics: it is political, they say, and not art.”
Marge Piercy, Parti-Colored Blocks for a Quilt

Wallace Stevens
“Poetry is a satisfying of the desire for resemblance. As the mere satisfying of a desire, it is pleasurable. But poetry if it did nothing but satisfy a desire would not rise above the level of many lesser things. Its singularity is that in the act of satisfying the desire for resemblance it touches the sense of reality, it enhances the sense of reality, heightens it, intensifies it.”
Wallace Stevens, The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and the Imagination

Wallace Stevens
“We cannot look at the past or the future except by means of the imagination but again the imagination of backward glances is one thing and the imagination of looks ahead something else. Even the psychologists concede this present particular, for, with them, memory involves a reproductive power, and looks ahead involve a creative power: the power of our expectations.”
Wallace Stevens, The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and the Imagination

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