Pakistani Quotes

Quotes tagged as "pakistani" (showing 1-16 of 16)
Muhammad Ali Jinnah
“Pakistan not only means freedom and independence but the Muslim Ideology which has to be preserved, which has come to us as a precious gift and treasure and which, we hope other will share with us.”
Muhammad Ali Jinnah

“They will become Godly when they will have God in their hearts.”
Riaz Ahmed Gohar Shahi, The Religion of God

Imran Khan
“My Pakistanis, you have not left me alone and I promise, I will never leave you alone in sha Allah”
Imran Khan

Mohsin Hamid
“I'm interested in things women do that aren't spoken about. Manto's stories let me breathe. They make me feel like less of a monster.”
Mohsin Hamid, Moth Smoke

Rohit Gore
“The real reason for Father Braganza's laughter was the history of Amrapur. It was a quaint town, nestled amidst barren mountains. The Hindus and Muslims living there were perpetually warring with each other, reacting violently at the slightest provocation. It had started a long time ago, this squabble, and had escalated into a terrible war. Some people say it started centuries ago, but many believe it started when the country gave one final, fierce shrug to rid itself of British rule. The shrug quickly became a relentless shuddering, and countless people were uprooted and flung into the air. Many didn't survive. Perhaps the mountains of Amrapur absorbed the deracinating wave. People weren't cruelly plucked from the town. They remained there, festering, becoming irate and harbouring murderous desires. And while the country was desperately trying to heal its near-mortal wounds and move on, Amrapur's dormant volcano erupted. Momentary and overlooked, but devastating. Leaders emerged on both sides and, driven by greed, they fed off the town's ignored bloodshed. They created ravines out of cracks, fostered hatred and grew richer. The Bhoite family, the erstwhile rulers of the ancient town, adopted the legacy of their British rulers---divide and conquer.”
Rohit Gore, A Darker Dawn

Zeenat Mahal
“Good humour was miles behind a second cup of morning tea. It was too early for nonsense.”
Zeenat Mahal, The Contract

Hanif Kureishi
“NASSER: (about OMAR): Haven't you trained him up to look after you, like I have done with my girls?
PAPA: He brushes the dust from one place to another. He squeezes shirts and heats soup. But that hardly stretches him. Though his food stretches me. It's only for a few months, yaar. I'll send him to college in the autumn.
NASSER: (VO) He failed once. He has this chronic laziness that runs in our family except for me.
PAPA: If his arse gets lazy - kick it. I'll send a certificate giving permission. And one more thing. Try and fix him up with a nice girl. I'm not sure if his penis is in full working order.”
Hanif Kureishi

“Only Give up,
When Your Hearts Gives up.

(Don't Give up, till your Last Breath)”
Fahad Rashiq

“Generation is the Important factor,

of the Growth of Ideas.”
Fahad Rashiq

Faiqa Mansab
“I'd morphed, altered, nipped and tucked away bits of my personality for so long, I no longer recognized myself. I feared that one day, even if I wanted to, I wouldn't be able to identify myself. I'd be forever trapped in an image of another's making, and there would be no escape because I would have forgotten to want to escape.
Nida”
Faiqa Mansab, THIS House of Clay and Water

“i believe in the freedom of state where every people have to right develop their culture and maintain the democracy while two things are very essential justice and equality - Long Live Pakistan and Happy Independence Day”
Avinash Advani

Rohit Gore
“The three flower shops were obliterated. The petals of the once-dewy flowers and their sellers' flesh burnt together. The people reacted and, unlike the birds, they did not react in unison. They ran towards the narrow streets near the masjid, trampling over the old and limping beggars. They pushed and shoved and cursed and cried. The birds circled in the air, pitying the humans who had lost their humanity.”
Rohit Gore, A Darker Dawn

Husain Haqqani
“Most Pakistanis would rather gloss over inconvenient truths or be content with blaming different villains for their country’s plight when confronted with unpleasant facts.”
Husain Haqqani, Reimagining Pakistan: Transforming a Dysfunctional Nuclear State

Husain Haqqani
“Pakistanis have constantly forgotten that offers of autonomy and recognition of linguistic and cultural separateness is often a better option than imposing greater centralization by force.”
Husain Haqqani, Reimagining Pakistan: Transforming a Dysfunctional Nuclear State

Ayesha Jalal
“Pakistanis have internalized the threats, imagined and real, to the political stability and security of their country. An overwhelming fear of continued chaos and violence, if not outright disintegration, has made it difficult to arrive at balanced assessments of a disturbing present in order to plan for the future as a unified and coherent nation.”
Ayesha Jalal, The Struggle for Pakistan: A Muslim Homeland and Global Politics

Ayesha Jalal
“Pakistan is a visibly perturbed and divided nation. Its people are struggling to find an answer to the mother of all questions: what sort of a Pakistan do they want along a spectrum of choices, ranging from an orthodox, religious state to a modern, enlightened one?”
Ayesha Jalal, The Struggle for Pakistan: A Muslim Homeland and Global Politics