Marlowe Quotes

Quotes tagged as "marlowe" Showing 1-22 of 22
Nikita Gill
“I am the girl who spends hours huddled in a corner of a library, trying to find what you love the most about Marlowe, just so I can write you a poem worthy of Shakespeare. I've made books my lovers, hours my enemies and you the only story.”
Nikita Gill, Your Body is an Ocean: Love and Other Experiments

Raymond Chandler
“I had a funny feeling as I saw the house disappear, as though I had written a poem and it was very good and I had lost it and would never remember it again.”
Raymond Chandler, The High Window

Christopher Marlowe
“The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike”
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

Christopher Marlowe
“I am Envy...I cannot read and therefore wish all books burned.”
Christopher Marlowe

Raymond Chandler
“I looked down at the chessboard. The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn't a game for knights.”
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep

Karen Chance
“Who is this Marlowe guy anyway? He's an ass. Threw him out. Threatened to have Ysmi sit on him if he returned.

Why are there two severed heads rolling around the house? Cats tried to eat one. Mostly prevented.

Headless guy is in hallway broom closet with head that I think is his.”
Karen Chance, Death's Mistress

Christopher Marlowe
“I am Envy, begotten of a chimney-sweeper and an oyster-wife. I cannot read, and therefore wish all books were burnt; I am lean with seeing others eat - O that there would come a famine through all the world, that all might die, and I live alone; then thou should'st see how fat I would be! But must thou sit and I stand? Come down, with a vengeance!”
Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus

E.A. Bucchianeri
“To be, or not to be: what a question!”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Faustus, who embraced evil and shunned righteousness, became the foremost symbol of the misuse of free will, that sublime gift from God with its inherent opportunity to choose virtue and reject iniquity. “What shall a man gain if he has the whole world and lose his soul,” (Matt. 16: v. 26) - but for a notorious name, the ethereal shadow of a career, and a brief life of fleeting pleasure with no true peace? This was the blackest and most captivating tragedy of all, few could have remained indifferent to the growing intrigue of this individual who apparently shook hands with the devil and freely chose to descend to the molten, sulphuric chasm of Hell for all eternity for so little in exchange. It is a drama that continues to fascinate today as powerfully as when Faustus first disseminated his infamous card in the Heidelberg locale to the scandal of his generation. In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1

E.A. Bucchianeri
“God Is, Lucifer is a devil, and there is a Hell.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1

Joseph Conrad
“The sight of it made the earth seem unearthly. They were accustomed to look upon the shackled form of a conquered monster, but there-- there you could look at a thing monstrous, beautiful, and free.”
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Thus, Marlowe posed the silent question: could aspiring Icarus be happy with a toilsome life on land managing a plough with plodding oxen having once tasted the weightless bliss of flight?”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Raymond Chandler
“Even on Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, he looked about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.”
Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely

Raymond Chandler
“I said: "Dead end - quiet, restful, like your town. I like a town like this." Marlowe (talking about Olympia) in a short story called Goldfish.”
Raymond Chandler, Collected Stories

E.A. Bucchianeri
“... the lofty mind of man can be imprisoned by the artifices of its own making.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Raymond Chandler
“She came back with the glass and her fingers, cold from holding the glass, touched mine, and I held them for a moment and then let them go slowly, as you let go of a dream when you wake with the sun in your face and you have been in an enchanted valley”
Raymond Chandler

Christopher Marlowe
“O, thou art fairer than the evening air
     Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars;
     Brighter art thou than flaming Jupiter
     When he appear'd to hapless Semele;
     More lovely than the monarch of the sky
     In wanton Arethusa's azur'd arms

Excerpt From: Christopher Marlowe. “The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus”
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

E.A. Bucchianeri
“(Marlowe's) Faustus stubbornly reverts to his atheistic beliefs and continues his elementary pagan re-education ~ the inferno to him is a 'place' invented by men.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Christopher Marlowe
Menaphon:
Your Majestie shall shortly have your wish,
And ride in triumph through Persepolis.
Tamburlaine:
And ride in triumph through Persepolis?
Is it not brave to be a King, Techelles?
Usumcasane and Theridamas,
Is it not passing brave to be a King,
And ride in triumph through Persepolis?”
Christopher Marlowe

“By the time you have a platform for saying what you want, you’ve already become part of the system. It’s how it works.”
Ingela Bohm, Rival Poet

Abigail   George
“Like water our ideals for writing what seems at first to be a calling to pen a masterpiece, it at first can be pure, fluid even (words can come easily) but we also have to learn to work with what our eyes glaze over as weak substitutes, words that we think have no substance to what we are learning towards. What is every poet's intention? Their intention is to forge, nullify, create, defend, fill the reader with the awe and inspiration that every poet themselves craves. They want to carve a name for themselves in the annals of history, leave a not so quiet legacy behind. Poets want immortality or rather they want their words to become immortal. Perhaps even Marlowe and Shakespeare had discussions about this.”
Abigail George, Feeding The Beasts

“Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici”
Кристофер Марло