Goethe Quotes

Quotes tagged as "goethe" Showing 1-30 of 107
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers & cities; but to know someone who thinks & feels with us, & who, though distant, is close to us in spirit, this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden.”
Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“I am proud of my heart alone, it is the sole source of everything, all our strength, happiness and misery. All the knowledge I possess everyone else can acquire, but my heart is all my own”
Goethe Wolfgang, The Sorrows of Young Werther

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“All theory is gray, my friend. But forever green is the tree of life.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, First Part

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“He is happiest, be he king or peasant, who finds peace in his home.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“I treat my heart like a sick child and gratify its every fancy.”
Goethe Wolfgang, The Sorrows of Young Werther

William Allingham
“Not like Homer would I write,
Not like Dante if I might,
Not like Shakespeare at his best,
Not like Goethe or the rest,
Like myself, however small,
Like myself, or not at all.”
William Allingham, Blackberries

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“The limits of my language are the limits of my universe.”
Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“If I wasn't a devil myself I'd give
Me up to the Devil this very minute.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Faustus, who embraced evil and shunned righteousness, became the foremost symbol of the misuse of free will, that sublime gift from God with its inherent opportunity to choose virtue and reject iniquity. “What shall a man gain if he has the whole world and lose his soul,” (Matt. 16: v. 26) - but for a notorious name, the ethereal shadow of a career, and a brief life of fleeting pleasure with no true peace? This was the blackest and most captivating tragedy of all, few could have remained indifferent to the growing intrigue of this individual who apparently shook hands with the devil and freely chose to descend to the molten, sulphuric chasm of Hell for all eternity for so little in exchange. It is a drama that continues to fascinate today as powerfully as when Faustus first disseminated his infamous card in the Heidelberg locale to the scandal of his generation. In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1

E.A. Bucchianeri
“... the vintage of history is forever repeating ~ same old vines, same old wines!”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul be Damned for the World, Vol. 2

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“How to please the public - that's the test,
But nowadays I find I'm in a fix;
I know they're not accustomed to the best,
But they've all read so much they know the tricks.
How can we give then something fresh and new
That's serious, but entertaining too?”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“If I love you, is that any of your business?”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Robert G. Ingersoll
“Is it possible that the Pentateuch could not have been written by uninspired men? that the assistance of God was necessary to produce these books? Is it possible that Galilei ascertained the mechanical principles of 'Virtual Velocity,' the laws of falling bodies and of all motion; that Copernicus ascertained the true position of the earth and accounted for all celestial phenomena; that Kepler discovered his three laws—discoveries of such importance that the 8th of May, 1618, may be called the birth-day of modern science; that Newton gave to the world the Method of Fluxions, the Theory of Universal Gravitation, and the Decomposition of Light; that Euclid, Cavalieri, Descartes, and Leibniz, almost completed the science of mathematics; that all the discoveries in optics, hydrostatics, pneumatics and chemistry, the experiments, discoveries, and inventions of Galvani, Volta, Franklin and Morse, of Trevithick, Watt and Fulton and of all the pioneers of progress—that all this was accomplished by uninspired men, while the writer of the Pentateuch was directed and inspired by an infinite God? Is it possible that the codes of China, India, Egypt, Greece and Rome were made by man, and that the laws recorded in the Pentateuch were alone given by God? Is it possible that Æschylus and Shakespeare, Burns, and Beranger, Goethe and Schiller, and all the poets of the world, and all their wondrous tragedies and songs are but the work of men, while no intelligence except the infinite God could be the author of the Pentateuch? Is it possible that of all the books that crowd the libraries of the world, the books of science, fiction, history and song, that all save only one, have been produced by man? Is it possible that of all these, the bible only is the work of God?”
Robert G. Ingersoll, Some Mistakes of Moses

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“„Was glänzt ist für den Augenblick geboren; Das Echte bleibt der Nachwelt unverloren.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, First Part

Heraclitus
“The lord whose is the oracle at Delphoi neither utters nor hides his meaning, but shows it by a sign.

The Sibyl, with raving lips uttering things mirthless, unbedizened, and unperfumed, reaches over a thousand years with her voice, thanks to the god in her.”
Heraclitus

Albert Camus
“The actor's realm is that of the fleeting. Of all kinds of fame, it is known, his is the most ephemeral. At least, this is said in conversation. But all kinds of fame are ephemeral. From the point of view of Sirius, Goethe's works in ten thousand years will be dust and his name forgotten.”
Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

Robert Anton Wilson
“If it were Hegel, I might suspect it means nothing. But Goethe means something, always.”
Robert Anton Wilson, Masks of the Illuminati

“Art is bad when ‘you see the intent and get put off.’ (Goethe) In Tolstoy one is unaware of the intent, and sees only the thing itself.
from the book, On Retranslating A Russian Classic Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy”
Joel Carmichael

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Grau, teurer Freund, ist alle Theorie und grün des Lebens goldner Baum”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, First Part
tags: goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“ Într-adevăr ştiu multe, dar aş vrea să ştiu totul. ”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Upon the publication of Goethe’s epic drama, the Faustian legend had reached an almost unapproachable zenith. Although many failed to appreciate, or indeed, to understand this magnum opus in its entirety, from this point onward his drama was the rule by which all other Faust adaptations were measured. Goethe had eclipsed the earlier legends and became the undisputed authority on the subject of Faust in the eyes of the new Romantic generation. To deviate from his path would be nothing short of blasphemy.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul be Damned for the World, Vol. 2

Thomas Henry Huxley
“In fact a favourite problem of Tyndall is—Given the molecular forces in a mutton chop, deduce Hamlet or Faust therefrom. He is confident that the Physics of the Future will solve this easily.”
Thomas Henry Huxley, Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley - Volume 1

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“When the sound and wholesome nature of man acts as an entirety, when he feels himself in the world as in a grand, beautiful, worthy and worthwhile whole, when this harmonious comfort affords him a pure, untrammeled delight: then the universe, if it could be sensible of itself, would shout for joy at having attained its goal and wonder at the pinnacle of its own essence and evolution. For what end is served by all the expenditure of suns and planets and moons, of stars and Milky Ways, of comets and nebula, of worlds evolving and passing away, if at last a happy man does not involuntarily rejoice in his existence?”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
tags: goethe

Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly
“Dandies, who – as you know - scorn all emotions as being beneath them, and do not believe, like that simpleton Goethe, that astonishment can ever be a proper feeling for the human mind.”
Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly, The Crimson Curtain

Arnold Hauser
“Just as his sentimentalism is profoundly middle-class and plebeian, but his irrationalism reactionary, so his moral philosophy also contains an inner contradiction: on the one hand, it is saturated with strongly plebeian characteristics, but on the other, it contains the germ of a new aristocratism. The concept of the ‘beautiful soul’ presupposes the complete dissolution of kalo-kagathia and implies the perfect spiritualization of all human values, but it also implies an application of aesthetic criteria to morality and is bound up with the view that moral values are the gift of nature. It means the recognition of a nobility of soul to which everyone has a right by nature, but in which the place of irrational birthrights is taken by an equally irrational quality of moral genius. The way of Rousseau’s ‘spiritual beauty’ leads, on the one hand, to characters like Dostoevsky’s Myshkin, who is a saint in the guise of an epilectic and an idiot, on the other, to the ideal of individual moral perfection which knows no social responsibility and does not aspire to be socially useful. Goethe, the Olympian, who thinks of nothing but his own spiritual perfection, is a disciple of Rousseau just as much as the young freethinker who wrote Werther.”
Arnold Hauser, The Social History of Art: Volume 3: Rococo, Classicism and Romanticism

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Zapanjen sam kako sam svjesno, korak po korak, ušao u sve to; kako sam uvijek u tako jasnom svjetlu vidio svoj položaj, a ipak sam postupao kao dijete; kako i sada još jasno vidim, a još uvijek nema ni traga nade da stvari pođu nabolje.”
Johann Wolfgang Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Des Menschen Kraft, im Dichter offenbart
The human power is revealed by poet
Il potere dell'umanità si rivela nel poeta”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“k Heb jarenlang achter mijn boeken zitten zweten;
en ‘k weet wel veel maar ik wil alles weten.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust

“Na een paar maanden constateert hij [Goethe] dat het hem zwaar valt rekenschap af te leggen van zijn verblijf, want - zo noteert hij op 25 januari 1787 - 'zoals men merkt dat de zee steeds dieper wordt naarmate men haar verder opvaart, zo vergaat het ook mij bij het beschouwen van deze stad'. Zich Rome werkelijk toe-eigenen vergt een mensenleven - zo verzucht de auteur enkele maanden later - 'of zelfs het leven van vele mensen, die stap voor stap van elkaar leren.”
Maarten Asscher, De ontdekking van Rome

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Comme les pêches et les melons sount pour la bouche d'un baron, ainsi les verges et les bâtons sont pour les fous, dit Salomon.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Italian Journey

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