Inventions Quotes

Quotes tagged as "inventions" Showing 1-30 of 75
Nicholson Baker
“Books: a beautifully browsable invention that needs no electricity and exists in a readable form no matter what happens.”
Nicholson Baker

Nikola Tesla
“I do not think you can name many great inventions that have been made by married men.”
Nikola Tesla

Christopher Hitchens
“Thus, though I dislike to differ with such a great man, Voltaire was simply ludicrous when he said that if god did not exist it would be necessary to invent him. The human invention of god is the problem to begin with.”
Christopher Hitchens, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

“When things get too complicated, it sometimes makes sense to stop and wonder: Have I asked the right question?”
Enrico Bombieri

Robert Schumann
“Remember, there are more people in the world than yourself. Be modest! You have not yet invented nor thought anything which others have not thought or invented before. And should you really have done so, consider it a gift of heaven which you are to share with others.”
Robert Schumann

Pooja Agnihotri
“Competition helps you to be innovative and innovation is what keeps us going and moving from one civilization to another advanced civilization.”
Pooja Agnihotri, 17 Reasons Why Businesses Fail :Unscrew Yourself From Business Failure

Robert G. Ingersoll
“Is it possible that the Pentateuch could not have been written by uninspired men? that the assistance of God was necessary to produce these books? Is it possible that Galilei ascertained the mechanical principles of 'Virtual Velocity,' the laws of falling bodies and of all motion; that Copernicus ascertained the true position of the earth and accounted for all celestial phenomena; that Kepler discovered his three laws—discoveries of such importance that the 8th of May, 1618, may be called the birth-day of modern science; that Newton gave to the world the Method of Fluxions, the Theory of Universal Gravitation, and the Decomposition of Light; that Euclid, Cavalieri, Descartes, and Leibniz, almost completed the science of mathematics; that all the discoveries in optics, hydrostatics, pneumatics and chemistry, the experiments, discoveries, and inventions of Galvani, Volta, Franklin and Morse, of Trevithick, Watt and Fulton and of all the pioneers of progress—that all this was accomplished by uninspired men, while the writer of the Pentateuch was directed and inspired by an infinite God? Is it possible that the codes of China, India, Egypt, Greece and Rome were made by man, and that the laws recorded in the Pentateuch were alone given by God? Is it possible that Æschylus and Shakespeare, Burns, and Beranger, Goethe and Schiller, and all the poets of the world, and all their wondrous tragedies and songs are but the work of men, while no intelligence except the infinite God could be the author of the Pentateuch? Is it possible that of all the books that crowd the libraries of the world, the books of science, fiction, history and song, that all save only one, have been produced by man? Is it possible that of all these, the bible only is the work of God?”
Robert G. Ingersoll, Some Mistakes of Moses

Pierre-Simon Laplace
“It is India that gave us the ingenious method of expressing all numbers by means of ten symbols, each symbol receiving a value of position as well as an absolute value; a profound and important idea which appears so simple to us now that we ignore its true merit. But its very simplicity and the great ease which it has lent to computations put our arithmetic in the first rank of useful inventions; and we shall appreciate the grandeur of the achievement the more when we remember that it escaped the genius of Archimedes and Apollonius, two of the greatest men produced by antiquity.”
Pierre-Simon Laplace

Israelmore Ayivor
“You were saved not by work, but for work. Do it till all is done. By your Inventions, Innovations, Initiatives, Improvements, Involvements, Imaginations, Information, Interventions and Inspirations... Go the extra mile and dare to do it.”
Israelmore Ayivor

“Did you ever think about the creation of the flame-thrower? Someone, somewhere, at some time must have been sitting on his porch, and said, thoughtfully, 'I want to set him on fire.' gesturing to his neighbor. His friend who sat beside him and happened to be handy with tools said, 'I can do that.' Thus, we have a flame thrower.”
John Larson

Umberto Eco
“[...] there is one inexorable law of technology, and it is this: when revolutionary inventions become widely accessible, they cease to be accessible. Technology is inherently democratic, because it promises the same services to all; but it works only if the rich are alone using it. When the poor also adopt technology, it stops working. A train used to take two hours to go from A to B; then the motor car arrived, which could cover the same distance in one hour. For this reason cars were very expensive. But as soon as the masses could afford to buy them, the roads became jammed, and the trains started to move faster. Consider how absurd it is for the authorities constantly to urge people to use public transport, in the age of the automobile; but with public transport, by consenting not to belong to the elite, you get where you're going before members of the elite do.”
Umberto Eco

Dejan Stojanovic
“We traveled long and forgot why poetry was invented.”
Dejan Stojanovic

Nikola Tesla
“Soon became convinced I was right and undertook the task with all the fire and boundless confidence of youth.”
Nikola Tesla, My Inventions

Rodney Stark
“That new technologies and techniques would be forthcoming was a fundamental article of Christian faith. Hence, no bishops or theologians denounced clocks or sailing ships--although both were condemned on religious grounds in various non-Western societies. ”
Rodney Stark

“Governments do not create, individuals create. Every invention was once just a thought inside someones head.”
William J Federer, Change to Chains-The 6,000 Year Quest for Control -Volume I-Rise of the Republic

Abhijit Naskar
“There was a time when necessity was the mother of invention, but today, over-abundance of technology has made us live in a world where, invention is the mother of necessity.”
Abhijit Naskar, Mission Reality

Suman Pokhrel
“May I pack all inventions in burlap and hide them in corners of Einsteins’ brains.”
Suman Pokhrel

Richie Norton
“Ideas become inventions become innovations.”
Richie Norton

“The FDA does not exist to protect you. They do no testing on any products. The FDA is a system that protects a person or person(s) from selling a product or products that could cause someone very important to lose money to others who may use that money and power to due them harm.”
James Thomas Kesterson Jr

Nikita Tak
“A good novel is the one which is well-researched on the topic that revolves around the novel.”
Nikita Tak, The Chocolate Cake

John Wilson
“„Well James,“ he said addressing me, as he does the officers in his command, informally, „it is true that many of our recent inventions will become much improved with use, and one day soon we may even have engines which do not break down with so much wheezing and groaning every two days of use, but I firmly believe that, while machines are perfectible, men are not.
Even a perfect machine must be run by men and, hence, subject to human errors. Take our situation as an example. Our machines keep us safe and warm, yet a simple mistake on our part, such as choosing one channel over another, could bring it all to naught and place us at the mercy of elemental nature. I believe we should work on the perfection of men before we worry overly about the perfection of his machines.”
John Wilson, North with Franklin: The Lost Journals of James Fitzjames

Shing-Tung Yau
“A lot of the mathematics discoveries occur through lucky accidents like that, [Calabi notes]. It's often a matter of connecting up ideas that might seem unrelated and then exploiting the newfound connection.”
Shing-Tung Yau, The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions

Douglas Rushkoff
“Simply remembering that corporations were invented should alone empower us to reinvent them to our liking.”
Douglas Rushkoff, Team Human

Graham Moore
“Edison and a few others had been working on improvements to Alexander Bell’s initial “telephone” device. Tesla was attempting to make the devices work without the aid of any wires at all. One didn’t have to be much of a scientist to know that this was absurd. Even if by some miracle Tesla managed to make them function, who in the world would have any use for them?”
Graham Moore, The Last Days of Night

“The amusement park was our best invention; the museum, our worst.”
Marty Rubin

“Thomas Edison was no an inventor but a very evil wealthy man with connections to the most wealthy Americans. He killed animals in order to demonize Nikola Tesla, the greatest inventor in human history. However, you will never learn about Tesla in any school system because he never wanted to be wealthy and his inventions were for the purpose of helping mankind. When JP Morgan, one of the most evil wealthy men in America, found out that Tesla wanted to give every human in the world free electricity, he stopped paying him and destroyed his invention to supply that free electricity. This is why you'll never learn about Tesla in the public school system.”
James Thomas Kesterson Jr

“Great inventors today or killed off long before we ever hear about them and their inventions stolen and developed by the wealthy as original ideas. This is why America has not produced one great inventor in the last 100 years and will never produce another great inventor.”
James Thomas Kesterson Jr

V.E. Schwab
“Of all the inventions Addie has seen her ushered into the world — steam-powered trains, electric lights, photography, and phones, and airplanes, and computers — movies might just be her favorite one.
Books are wonderful, portable, lasting, but sitting there, in the darkened theater, the wide screen filling her vision, the world falls away, and for a few short hours she is someone else, plunged into romance and intrigue and comedy and adventure.”
V.E. Schwab, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

V.E. Schwab
“Of all the inventions Addie has seen ushered into the world—steam-powered trains, electric lights, photography, and phones, and airplanes, and computers—movies might just be her favorite one.
Books are wonderful, portable, lasting, but sitting there, in the darkened theater, the wide screen filling her vision, the world falls away, and for a few short hours she is someone else, plunged into romance and intrigue and comedy and adventure. All of it complete with 4K picture and stereo sound.
A quiet heaviness fills her chest when the credits roll. For a while she was weightless, but now she returns to herself, sinking until her feet are back on the ground.”
V.E. Schwab, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

“Above all, we will need more public goods and more positive externalities. Star Trek teaches us that humanity’s wondrous inventions do not fully realize their potential until they are freely shared.”
Manu Saadia, Trekonomics: The Economics of Star Trek

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