Faustus Quotes

Quotes tagged as "faustus" Showing 1-17 of 17
Christopher Marlowe
“Faustus: Stay, Mephistopheles, and tell me, what good will
my soul do thy lord?

Mephistopheles: Enlarge his kingdom.

Faustus: Is that the reason he tempts us thus?

Mephistopheles: Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris.
(It is a comfort to the wretched to have companions in misery.)”
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

Christopher Marlowe
“What art thou Faustus, but a man condemned to die?”
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

Christopher Marlowe
“The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike”
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

Christopher Marlowe
“I am Envy, begotten of a chimney-sweeper and an oyster-wife. I cannot read, and therefore wish all books were burnt; I am lean with seeing others eat - O that there would come a famine through all the world, that all might die, and I live alone; then thou should'st see how fat I would be! But must thou sit and I stand? Come down, with a vengeance!”
Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Faustus, who embraced evil and shunned righteousness, became the foremost symbol of the misuse of free will, that sublime gift from God with its inherent opportunity to choose virtue and reject iniquity. “What shall a man gain if he has the whole world and lose his soul,” (Matt. 16: v. 26) - but for a notorious name, the ethereal shadow of a career, and a brief life of fleeting pleasure with no true peace? This was the blackest and most captivating tragedy of all, few could have remained indifferent to the growing intrigue of this individual who apparently shook hands with the devil and freely chose to descend to the molten, sulphuric chasm of Hell for all eternity for so little in exchange. It is a drama that continues to fascinate today as powerfully as when Faustus first disseminated his infamous card in the Heidelberg locale to the scandal of his generation. In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Thus, Marlowe posed the silent question: could aspiring Icarus be happy with a toilsome life on land managing a plough with plodding oxen having once tasted the weightless bliss of flight?”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“What you inherit from your father
must first be earned before it's yours.”
Goethe

E.A. Bucchianeri
“... the lofty mind of man can be imprisoned by the artifices of its own making.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Being full of mischief, they love to listen;
they gladly obey, for they like to betray you,
pretending to be sent from Heaven,
and lisping like angels, while they lie.”
Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“When he comes to the door
he always looks mocking and half-way angry.
You can see he has sympathy for nothing.
It's written on his forehead
that he can love no one.”
Goethe

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Upon the publication of Goethe’s epic drama, the Faustian legend had reached an almost unapproachable zenith. Although many failed to appreciate, or indeed, to understand this magnum opus in its entirety, from this point onward his drama was the rule by which all other Faust adaptations were measured. Goethe had eclipsed the earlier legends and became the undisputed authority on the subject of Faust in the eyes of the new Romantic generation. To deviate from his path would be nothing short of blasphemy.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul be Damned for the World, Vol. 2

E.A. Bucchianeri
“... Faustus ... dared to confirm he had advanced beyond the level of a scarlet sinner — he was a conscious follower of the Prince of Darkness. The fact he could publicly project an Antichrist image with pride, having no fear of reprisal, and his seeming diabolical art of escaping all punishment when others who were considered heretics had burned at the stake for less, would certainly signal that an unnatural individual walked in their midst. It is true in many respects he assumed the role of the charlatan, yet how apropos, considering his willingness to follow his ‘brother-in-law’ known as the Father of Lies and deception.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

E.A. Bucchianeri
“In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1

E.A. Bucchianeri
“(Marlowe's) Faustus stubbornly reverts to his atheistic beliefs and continues his elementary pagan re-education ~ the inferno to him is a 'place' invented by men.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Men grieve [Mephistopheles] so with the days of their lamenting, [he] even hate[s] to plague them with [his] torments.”
Goethe

Ljupka Cvetanova
“A success? Selling the most valuable thing in ourselves.”
Ljupka Cvetanova, The New Land

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“Des Menschen Kraft, im Dichter offenbart
The human power is revealed by poet
Il potere dell'umanità si rivela nel poeta”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe