Hemingway Quotes

Quotes tagged as "hemingway" Showing 1-30 of 103
Ernest Hemingway
“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Ernest Hemingway
“I am always in love.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway
“Most people were heartless about turtles because a turtle’s heart will beat for hours after it has been cut up and butchered. But the old man thought, I have such a heart too.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway
“He no longer dreamed of storms, nor of women, nor of great occurrences, nor of great fish, nor fights, nor contests of strength, nor of his wife. He only dreamed of places now and the lions on the beach. They played like young cats in the dusk and he loved them as he loved the boy. He never dreamed about the boy. He simply woke, looked out the open door at the moon and unrolled his trousers and put them on.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway
“Perhaps as you went along you did learn something. I did not care what it was all about. All I wanted to know was how to live in it. Maybe if you found out how to live in it you learned from that what it was all about.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway
“The people that I liked and had not met went to the big cafes because they were lost in them and no one noticed them and they could be alone in them and be together.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Ernest Hemingway
“He remembered the time he had hooked one of a pair of marlin. The male fish always let the female fish feed first and the hooked fish, the female, made a wild, panic-stricken, despairing fight that soon exhausted her, and all the time the male had stayed with her, crossing the line and circling with her on the surface. He had stayed so close that the old man was afraid he would cut the line with his tail which was sharp as a scythe and almost of that size and shape. When the old man had gaffed her and clubbed her, holding the rapier bill with its sandpaper edge and clubbing her across the top of her head until her colour turned to a colour almost like the backing of mirrors, and then, with the boy’s aid, hoisted her aboard, the male fish had stayed by the side of the boat. Then, while the old man was clearing the lines and preparing the harpoon, the male fish jumped high into the air beside the boat to see where the female was and then went down deep, his lavender wings, that were his pectoral fins, spread wide and all his wide lavender stripes showing. He was beautiful, the old man remembered, and he had stayed.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway
“My father was a deeply sentimental man. And like all sentimental men, he was also very cruel.”
Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway
“You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Ernest Hemingway
“Only I have no luck any more. But who knows? Maybe today. Every day is a new day. It is better to be lucky. But I would rather be exact. Then when luck comes you are ready.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway
“wonder what day god created the egg' 'how should we know? we should not question. our stay on earth is not for long. let us rejoice and believe and give thanks'. 'eat a egg”
Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway
“No good book has ever been written that has in it symbols arrived at beforehand and stuck in. ... I tried to make a real old man, a real boy, a real sea and a real fish and real sharks. But if I made them good and true enough they would mean many things”
Earnest Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway's the Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway
“Prose is architecture and the Baroque age is over.”
Ernest Hemingway

Elmore Leonard
“I started out of course with Hemingway when I learned how to write. Until I realized Hemingway doesn't have a sense of humor. He never has anything funny in his stories.”
Elmore Leonard

Tobias Wolff
“We even talked like Hemingway characters, though in travesty, as if to deny our discipleship: That is your bed, and it is a good bed, and you must make it and you must make it well. Or: Today is the day of the meatloaf. The meatloaf is swell. It is swell but when it is gone the not-having meatloaf will be tragic and the meatloaf man will not come anymore.”
Tobias Wolff, Old School

Ernest Hemingway
“that every day should be a fiesta seemed to me a marvelous discovery”
Ernest Hemingway

Bridie Clark
“I'd known since girlhood that I wanted to be a book editor. By high school, I'd pore over the acknowledgments section of novels I loved, daydreaming that someday a brilliant talent might see me as the person who 'made her book possible' or 'enhanced every page with editorial wisdom and insight.' Could I be the Maxwell Perkins to some future Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wolfe?”
Bridie Clark, Because She Can

Ernest Hemingway
“In those days we did not trust anyone who had not been in the war, but we did not
completely trust anyone.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Michael Hogan
“When words fail, the hammer drops,
living can never be its own excuse.”
Michael Hogan, Winter Solstice

Ernest Hemingway
“I even read aloud the part of the novel I had rewritten, which is about as low as a writer can get and much more dangerous for him than glacier skiing unroped before the full winter snowfall has set over the crevices.
When they said, 'It's great, Ernest. Truly, it's great. You cannot know the thing it has," I wagged my tail in pleasure and plunged into the fiesta concept of life to see if I could not bring some attractive stick back, instead of thinking, 'If these bastards like it what is wrong with it?' That was what I would think if I had been functioning as a professional although, if I had been functioning as a professional, I would never have read it to them.”
Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway
“I had never known any man to die while speaking in terza-rima”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Ernest Hemingway
“for all the poor in the world against all tyranny”
Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway
“The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shockproof, shit detector. This is the writer’s radar and all great writers have had it.”
Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway
“But then we did not think ever of ourselves as poor. We did not accept it. We thought we were superior people and other people that we looked down on and rightly mistrusted were rich. It had never seemed strange to me to wear sweatshirts for underwear to keep warm. It only seemed odd to rich. We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Lorrie Moore
“Before he wrote about them," said Quilty, pretending to read the guidebook out loud, "Hemingway shot his characters. It was considered an unusual but not unheard-of creative method. Still, even within literary circles, it is not that widely discussed.”
Lorrie Moore, Birds of America

Phen Weston
“I typed regret
into a search engine
and the familiar face
of Hemingway appeared.
Were his words
poured out for me
like wine waiting
for lost hearts?”
Phen Weston

“There's a well kept secret to intense and heartfelt writing. Let your words bleed. (A new take on Hemingway's famous quote)”
Sky Bardsey

Bob Woodward
“It's a good thing," Trump said, "but it's a bit of a shame because I was the Ernest Hemingway of 140 characters.”
Bob Woodward, Fear: Trump in the White House

Ernest Hemingway
“Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk... that will teach you to keep your mouth shut.
---Ernest Hemingway”
Ernest Hemingway

Joël Dicker
“«Harry, perché gli scrittori sono persone così sole? Hemingway, Melville... Sono gli uomini più soli del mondo!»
«Non so se siano gli scrittori a essere soli, o se sia la solitudine a spingerli a scrivere...»”
Joël Dicker, La Vérité sur l'affaire Harry Quebert

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