Spain Quotes

Quotes tagged as "spain" (showing 1-30 of 86)
Peter Singer
“To protest about bullfighting in Spain, the eating of dogs in South Korea, or the slaughter of baby seals in Canada while continuing to eat eggs from hens who have spent their lives crammed into cages, or veal from calves who have been deprived of their mothers, their proper diet, and the freedom to lie down with their legs extended, is like denouncing apartheid in South Africa while asking your neighbors not to sell their houses to blacks.”
Peter Singer, Animal Liberation

Elizabeth I
“And therefore I am come amongst you at this time, not as for my recreation or sport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all; to lay down, for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even the dust. I know I have but the body of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart of a king, and of a king of England, too.”
Elizabeth I

Henry Miller
“Certainly paradise, whatever, wherever it be, contains flaws. (Paradisical flaws, if you like.) If it did not, it would be incapable of drawing the hearts of men or angels.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch

Albert Camus
“It was in Spain that [my generation] learned that one can be right and yet be beaten, that force can vanquish spirit, that there are times when courage is not its own recompense. It is this, doubtless, which explains why so many, the world over, feel the Spanish drama as a personal tragedy.”
Albert Camus

Christopher Hitchens
“Hitherto, the Palestinians had been relatively immune to this Allahu Akhbar style. I thought this was a hugely retrograde development. I said as much to Edward. To reprint Nazi propaganda and to make a theocratic claim to Spanish soil was to be a protofascist and a supporter of 'Caliphate' imperialism: it had nothing at all to do with the mistreatment of the Palestinians. Once again, he did not exactly disagree. But he was anxious to emphasize that the Israelis had often encouraged Hamas as a foil against Fatah and the PLO. This I had known since seeing the burning out of leftist Palestinians by Muslim mobs in Gaza as early as 1981. Yet once again, it seemed Edward could only condemn Islamism if it could somehow be blamed on either Israel or the United States or the West, and not as a thing in itself. He sometimes employed the same sort of knight's move when discussing other Arabist movements, excoriating Saddam Hussein's Ba'ath Party, for example, mainly because it had once enjoyed the support of the CIA. But when Saddam was really being attacked, as in the case of his use of chemical weapons on noncombatants at Halabja, Edward gave second-hand currency to the falsified story that it had 'really' been the Iranians who had done it. If that didn't work, well, hadn't the United States sold Saddam the weaponry in the first place? Finally, and always—and this question wasn't automatically discredited by being a change of subject—what about Israel's unwanted and ugly rule over more and more millions of non-Jews?

I evolved a test for this mentality, which I applied to more people than Edward. What would, or did, the relevant person say when the United States intervened to stop the massacres and dispossessions in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo? Here were two majority-Muslim territories and populations being vilely mistreated by Orthodox and Catholic Christians. There was no oil in the region. The state interests of Israel were not involved (indeed, Ariel Sharon publicly opposed the return of the Kosovar refugees to their homes on the grounds that it set an alarming—I want to say 'unsettling'—precedent). The usual national-security 'hawks,' like Henry Kissinger, were also strongly opposed to the mission. One evening at Edward's apartment, with the other guest being the mercurial, courageous Azmi Bishara, then one of the more distinguished Arab members of the Israeli parliament, I was finally able to leave the arguing to someone else. Bishara [...] was quite shocked that Edward would not lend public support to Clinton for finally doing the right thing in the Balkans. Why was he being so stubborn? I had begun by then—belatedly you may say—to guess. Rather like our then-friend Noam Chomsky, Edward in the final instance believed that if the United States was doing something, then that thing could not by definition be a moral or ethical action.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir

Ernest Hemingway
“Are you a communist?"
"No I am an anti-fascist"
"For a long time?"
"Since I have understood fascism.”
Ernest Hemingway, For Whom the Bell Tolls

Christopher Hitchens
“Call no man lucky until he is dead, but there have been moment of rare satisfaction in the often random and fragmented life of the radical freelance scribbler. I have lived to see Ronald Reagan called “a useful idiot for Kremlin propaganda” by his former idolators; to see the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union regarded with fear and suspicion by the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (which blacked out an interview with Miloš Forman broadcast live on Moscow TV); to see Mao Zedong relegated like a despot of antiquity. I have also had the extraordinary pleasure of revisiting countries—Greece, Spain, Zimbabwe, and others—that were dictatorships or colonies when first I saw them. Other mini-Reichs have melted like dew, often bringing exiled and imprisoned friends blinking modestly and honorably into the glare. E pur si muove—it still moves, all right.”
Christopher Hitchens, Prepared for the Worst: Selected Essays and Minority Reports

Carlos Ruiz Zafón
“Recorrí pasillos y galerías en espiral pobladas por cientos, miles de tomos que parecían saber más acerca de mí que yo de ellos. Al poco, me asaltó la idea de que tras la cubierta de cada uno de aquellos libros se abría un universo infinito por explorar y de que, más allá de aquellos muros, el mundo dejaba pasar la vida en tardes de fútbol y seriales de radio, satisfecho con ver hasta allí donde alcanza su ombligo y poco más. Quizá fue aquel pensamiento, quizá el azar o su pariente de gala, el destino, pero en aquel mismo instante supe que ya había elegido el libro que iba a adoptar. O quizá debiera decir el libro que me iba a adoptar a mí. Se asomaba tímidamente en el extremo de una estantería, encuadernado en piel de color vino y susurrando su título en letras doradas que ardían a la luz que destilaba la cúpula desde lo alto. Me acerqué hasta él y acaricié las palabras con la yema de los dedos, leyendo en silencio.
La Sombra del Viento
JULIÁN CARAX.”
Carlos Ruiz Zafón, The Shadow of the Wind

Ernest Hemingway
“Thou askest me to take things seriously? After what thou didst last night? When thou needest to kill a man and instead did what you did? You were supposed to kill one, not make one! When we have just seen the sky full of airplanes of a quantity to kill us back to our grandfathers and forward to all unborn grandsons including all cats, goats and bedbugs. Airplanes making a noise to curdle the milk in your mother's breasts as they pass over darkening the sky and roaring like lions and you ask me to take things seriously. I take them too seriously already.”
Ernest Hemingway

Saddam Hussein
“Based on the considerations of history, ancient history, and international axioms, the logic of following up a citizen with his shadow for the purpose of the demarcation of political frontiers of any state has been discounted for international conventions. For example the Arabs cannot ask Spain just because they were there some time in the past nor can they ask for any other area outside the frontiers of the Arab homeland”
Saddam Hussein, Saddam Hussein on Current Events in Iraq

“To Judaism Christians ascribe the glory of having been the first religion to teach a pure monotheism. But monotheism existed long before the Jews attained to it. Zoroaster and his earliest followers were monotheists, dualism being a later development of the Persian theology. The adoption of monotheism by the Jews, which occurred only at a very late period in their history, was not, however, the result of a divine revelation, or even of an intellectual superiority, for the Jews were immeasurably inferior intellectually to the Greeks and Romans, to the Hindus and Egyptians, and to the Assyrians and Babylonians, who are supposed to have retained a belief in polytheism. This monotheism of the Jews has chiefly the result of a religious intolerance never before equaled and never since surpassed, except in the history of Christianity and Mohammedanism, the daughters of Judaism. Jehovistic priests and kings tolerated no rivals of their god and made death the penalty for disloyalty to him. The Jewish nation became monotheistic for the same reason that Spain, in the clutches of the Inquisition, became entirely Christian.”
John E. Remsburg, The Christ

“Freedom, or individual liberty, was a basic premise of the Spanish anarchist tradition. "Individual sovereignty" is a prime tenet of most anarchist writing; the free development of one' s individual potential is one of the basic "rights" to which all humans are born. Yet Spanish anarchists were firmly rooted in the communalist-anarchist tradition. For them, freedom was fundamentally a social product: the fullest expression of individuality and of creativity can be achieved only in and through community. As Carmen Conde (a teacher who was also active in Mujeres Libres) wrote, describing the relationship of individuality and community: "I and my truth; I and my faith ... And I for you, but without ever ceasing to be me, so that you can always be you. Because I don' t exist without your existence, but my existence is also indispensable to yours.”
Martha A. Ackelsberg, Free Women of Spain: Anarchism and the Struggle for the Emancipation of Women

David T. Dellinger
“After Spain, World War II was simple. I wasn't even tempted to pick up a gun to fight for General Motors, U.S. Steel, or the Chase Manhattan Bank, even if Hitler was running the other side.”
David T. Dellinger, From Yale to Jail: The Life Story of a Moral Dissenter

Michel del Castillo
“Dans une guerre il n'y a ni vainqueurs ni vaincus: rien que des victimes.”
Michel del Castillo, Tanguy

Ramón María del Valle-Inclán
“En España podrá faltar el pan, pero el ingenio y el buen humor no se acaban”
Ramón María del Valle-Inclán, Luces de bohemia: Esperpento

Christopher Hitchens
“I can remember when I was a bit of an ETA fan myself. It was in 1973, when a group of Basque militants assassinated Adm. Carrero Blanco. The admiral was a stone-faced secret police chief, personally groomed to be the successor to the decrepit Francisco Franco. His car blew up, killing only him and his chauffeur with a carefully planted charge, and not only was the world well rid of another fascist, but, more important, the whole scheme of extending Franco's rule was vaporized in the same instant. The dictator had to turn instead to Crown Prince Juan Carlos, who turned out to be the best Bourbon in history and who swiftly dismantled Franco's entire system. If this action was 'terrorism,' it had something to be said for it. Everyone I knew in Spain made a little holiday in their hearts when the gruesome admiral went sky-high.”
Christopher Hitchens, Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left

Ramón María del Valle-Inclán
“En España el mérito no se premia. Se premia el robar y el ser sinvergüenza. En España se premia todo lo malo”
Ramón María del Valle-Inclán, Luces de bohemia: Esperpento

José Manuel Caballero Bonald
“- ¿Qué, se dio bien la noche? - preguntó la mujer. (...) - Tempranito - volvió a decir la mujer.
- ¿Eh?
- Y sereno.
- Eso es lo que hay.
- ¿Cayó algo?
- Relente.”
José Manuel Caballero Bonald

Wendy Werneth
“Spain is more vegan-friendly than you've been led to believe. The truth is, most places are.”
Wendy Werneth

M.B. Dallocchio
“That seductive aroma of unchecked power was more than enough to commit genocide and mass sexual assault while unashamedly carrying their nation’s flag draped around a crucifix. People completely devoid of introspection, flaunting their entitlement and a self-importance that masked an endless pit of dejection that demanded more gold, land, and power. The Spanish crown was a plague of miserable dimensions for Chamorros.”
M.B. Dallocchio, The Desert Warrior

Dawn Patitucci
“The Spaniards were seated at a table by the hearth, dominating the room with their mustachioed handsomeness and aggressive good cheer.”
Dawn Patitucci, The Queen's Prophet

Dawn Patitucci
“The Queen wore a resplendent dress, with a skirt wide enough to hide two dwarfs comfortably, and a hatched bodice that looked like a gold-dipped waffle.”
Dawn Patitucci, The Queen's Prophet

Dawn Patitucci
“Mari's original plan to have the Queen play coy with the King was, she now realized, woefully inadequate—a milkmaid's game, played against actual military commanders.”
Dawn Patitucci, The Queen's Prophet

Dawn Patitucci
“Nicolas was dressed exquisitely tonight, with his usual air of effortlessness, in a silk doublet the color of blackberries and dotted with freshwater pearls, snug as a fruitskin against his tiny torso, and a ruff so crisply starched and diaphanous it looked to have been spun from sugar.”
Dawn Patitucci, The Queen's Prophet

Carlos Ruiz Zafón
“Els Quatre Gats was just a five-minute walk from our house and one of my favourite haunts. My parents had met there in 1932, and I attributed my one-way ticket into this world in part to the old cafe's charms. Stone dragons guarded a lamplit facade. Inside, voices seemed to echo with shadows of other times. Accountants, dreamers, and would-be geniuses shared tables with the spectres of Pablo Picasso, Isaac Albeniz, Federico Garcia Lorca, and Salvador Dali. There any poor devil could pass for a historical figure for the price of a small coffee.”
Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Francisco Franco
“Ahora se habla de democracia. Nosotros, los españoles, ya la hemos conocido. Y no nos dio resultado. Cuando otros van hacia la democracia, nosotros ya estamos de vuelta. Estamos dispuestos a sentarnos en la meta y esperar a que los otros regresen también.”
Francisco Franco

Francisco Franco
“Al llegar para mí la hora de rendir la vida ante el Altísimo, no olvidéis que los enemigos de España y de la civilización cristiana están alerta. Velad también vosotros, y para ello deponed, frente a los supremos intereses de la Patria y del pueblo español, toda mira personal.”
Francisco Franco

Francisco Franco
“En el día de hoy, cautivo y desarmado el Ejército Rojo, han alcanzado las tropas nacionales sus últimos objetivos militares. La guerra ha terminado.

[Parte oficial de guerra del 1 de abril de 1939]”
Francisco Franco

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
“Incluso aunque nuestros hombres y sus generales distaban de ser los mismos que cuando el duque de Alba y Alejandro Farnesio, los soldados españoles continuaron siendo por algún tiempo la pesadilla de Europa; los mismos que habían capturado a un rey francés en Pavía, vencido en San Quintín, saqueado Roma y Amberes, tomado Amiens y Ostende, matado diez mil enemigos en el asalto de Jemmigen, ocho mil en Maastrich y nueve mil en La Esclusa, peleando al arma blanca con el agua hasta la cintura. Éramos la ira de Dios.”
Arturo Pérez-Reverte, The Sun Over Breda

Anaïs Nin
“The women cannot go out except to go to church or to the bullfight, and even that is unusual. I consider it a very ugly custom, and if I couldn't go out as I wished, I would leave this country [Spain], if only because of that one custom of the inhabitants.”
Anaïs Nin, Linotte: The Early Diary of Anais Nin

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