David T. Dellinger





David T. Dellinger


Born
in The United States
August 22, 1915

Died
May 25, 2004

Genre

Influences


Born in Massachusetts, son of a prominent lawyer. Educated at Yale, Oxford, and Union Theological Seminary. Imprisoned during World War II for draft refusal, David Dellinger became the leader of the American peace movement during the Vietnam war. One of the Chicago 8 defendants arrested for nonviolent protest at the 1968 Democratic convention. Publisher of Liberation Magazine and other influential journals of progressive thought. Died in Vermont.

Average rating: 4.18 · 101 ratings · 18 reviews · 7 distinct works
From Yale to Jail: The Life...

4.30 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1993 — 3 editions
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Revolutionary Nonviolence: ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1970 — 3 editions
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More Power Than We Know: Th...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1975 — 2 editions
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Vietnam Revisited

4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
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Walls and Bars: Prisons and...

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4.06 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1927 — 9 editions
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The Conspiracy

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3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1969
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Beyond Survival: New Direct...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1983 — 2 editions
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More books by David T. Dellinger…
“The changes that take place when liberal Democrats replace not so liberal or compassionate Republicans (or Democrats) are merely cosmetic. ”
David T. Dellinger

“There is a heady sense of manhood that comes from advancing from apathy to commitment, from timidity to courage, from passivity to aggressiveness. There is an intoxication that comes from standing up to the police at last.”
David T. Dellinger, From Yale to Jail: The Life Story of a Moral Dissenter

“This is a diseased world in which it is impossible for anyone to be fully human. One way or another, everyone who lives in the modern world is sick or maladjusted.”
David T. Dellinger, Revolutionary Nonviolence: Essays