Bath Quotes

Quotes tagged as "bath" (showing 1-29 of 29)
Cassandra Clare
“Do you remember back at the hotel when you promised that if we lived, you’d get dressed up in a nurse’s outfit and give me a sponge bath?" asked Jace.
"It was Simon who promised you the sponge bath."
"As soon as I’m back on my feet, handsome," said Simon.
"I knew we should have left you a rat.”
Cassandra Clare, City of Bones

Sylvia Plath
“There must be quite a few things a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them. Whenever I’m sad I’m going to die, or so nervous I can’t sleep, or in love with somebody I won’t be seeing for a week, I slump down just so far and then I say: 'I’ll go take a hot bath.'

I meditate in the bath.The water needs to be very hot, so hot you can barely stand putting your foot in it. Then you lower yourself, inch by inch, till the water’s up to your neck.

I remember the ceiling over every bathtub I’ve stretched out in. I remember the texture of the ceilings and the cracks and the colors and the damp spots and the light fixtures. I remember the tubs, too: the antique griffin-legged tubs, and the modern coffin-shaped tubs, and the fancy pink marble tubs overlooking indoor lily ponds, and I remember the shapes and sizes of the water taps and the different sorts of soap holders.

I never feel so much myself as when I’m in a hot bath.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

Kamand Kojouri
“Reading poetry is like undressing before a bath. You don't undress out of fear that your clothes will become wet. You undress because you want the water to touch you. You want to completely immerse yourself in the feeling of the water and to emerge anew.”
Kamand Kojouri

Nalini Singh
“When you've lived as long as I have," he said, eyes heavy-lidded but definitely on her, "you learn to appreciate new sensations. They are rare in an immortal's life."

She found she'd moved toward him. He hooked her arm around her waist, pulling her closer until she straddled him as he sat on a ledge below the waterline, her legs wrapped around his waist.

He settled her firmly against him.

Sucking in a breath, she said, "Sex isn't new to you," and rocked her heat over the exquisite hardness of him. Good didn't begin to describe how it felt. How he felt.

"No. But you are."

"Never had a hunter before?" She grinned, nibbling on his lower lip.

But he didn't smile. "I've never had Elena before." The words were husky, his eyes so intent she felt owned.”
Nalini Singh, Angels' Blood

Katie MacAlister
“You took a bath without me?"
I smiled to myself at the accusation in his voice.”
Katie MacAlister, Sex, Lies and Vampires

Richelle E. Goodrich
“I love the magic of a hot bath, how time pauses and every grievance melts away.”
Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway

Jasper Fforde
“There is no problem on earth that can't be ameliorated by a hot bath and a cup of tea.”
Jasper Fforde, Shades of Grey
tags: bath, cure, tea

Sherwood Anderson
“She is always pretending she loves me, but look at her now. Am I in her thoughts? Is there a tender look in her eyes? Is she dreaming of me as she walks along the streets?”
Sherwood Anderson, Death in the Woods and Other Stories

Sylvia Plath
“There must be quite a few things a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them. Whenever I’m sad I’m going to die, or so nervous I can’t sleep, or in love with somebody I won’t be seeing for a week, I slump down so far and then I say: ‘I’ll go take a hot bath.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar
tags: bath

Tobias Smollett
“I can't help suspecting, that there is, or may be some regurgitation from the bath into the cistern of the pump. In that case, what a felicate beveridge is quaffed by the drinkers; medicated with the sweat and the dirt, and dandriff; and the abominable of various kinds, from twenty different diseased bodies, parboiling in the kettle below.”
Tobias Smollett, The Expedition of Humphry Clinker

Jane Austen
“He hoped she might make some amends for the many very plain faces he was continually passing in the streets. The worst of Bath was the number of its plain women. He did not mean to say there were not pretty women, but the number of the plain was out of all proportion. He had frequently observed, as he walked, that one handsome face would be followed by thirty, or five-and-thirty frights; and once, as he had stood in a shop on Bond street, he had counted eighty-seven women go by, without there being a tolerable face among them. ... But still, there certainly were a dreadful multitude of ugly women in Bath; and as for the men! they were infinitely worse. Such scarecrows as the streets were full of!”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Jay McInerney
“I’m about to take a shower because I smell like an all-nighter, then I think I’ll take a bath so I can have a faucet orgasm. After all, I didn’t get any last night. A faucet orgasm is pretty much the same principle as a bidet orgasm except upside-down. When we were growing up we had bidets in all the bathrooms and when I was about ten I accidentally discovered one of the things they were good for. After that I used to spend hours on the damn thing. This dump we rent doesn’t have a bidet so I have to get in the tub and slide up toward the front, running my legs up the wall on either side of the faucet. Turn on the warm water and smile. Actually, you’ve got to get the water temperature just right first or you could really be in for a nasty shock. I’ve made that mistake a few times. This time I get it just right and I come three times before I get around to actually taking a bath.”
Jay McInerney, Story of My Life

“I didn't like Dali: now, like you, I do. Like you, I began to drink my Coke with a pinch of salt . Like you, I stopped bothering about ironed clothes. Like you, I sit with a dictionary while reading the papers. Like you, I sit on the compound wall after a bath.”
Sachin Kundalkar, Cobalt Blue

“Home-grown pears are best eaten in the bath - they're so juicy, it's the easiest way to stay clean!”
Mitchell Beazley

Don DeLillo
“How language is webbed in the senses. Out of sand-blazed brilliance into quirky minds such as his, into touch, taste and fragrance. He thought he'd linger just a bit longer, let the bath take total hold, ease and alleviate, before he put on clothes and entered the complex boxes where people do their living.
Nothing fits the body so well as water.”
Don DeLillo

Dodie Smith
“I believe it is customary to get get one's washing over first in baths and bask afterwards; personally, I bask first. I have discovered that the first few minutes are the best and not to be wasted--- my brain always seethes with ideas and life suddenly looks much better than it did...So I bask first, wash second and then read as long as the hot water holds out. The last stage of a bath, when the water is cooling and there is nothing to look forward to, can be pretty disillusioning.”
Dodie Smith

Jay Woodman
“LOOKING

The world goes by, and what have I to do with it? I merely observe how the geese stretch their necks towards the orange rim of sky. I watch how light fades and children make their way home, hungry and tired. The bushes outside become ghosts while baths run and kitchen windows steam up with the cooking. This is the smell of our home, where I have a place in the wrinkled hours making beds and hugging boys awake. This is the sound of the house where I feel out lives into words, translate ragged nights and days into something whole, or try to. You may look if you wish..... The world goes by, and what have you or I to do with it, except perhaps for looking... ?”
Jay Woodman, SPAN

“have you killed me, false thief?”
Chaucer Geoffrey, Selections from Chaucer - Scholar's Choice Edition

Sheila Kohler
“The bath is one of the places I prefer, certainly not a place I leave readily, a place where one can close the door and remove oneself, put oneself in parentheses, as it were, from the rest of humanity. It is a place for reading and thinking, where one's mind wanders easily, where time seems temporarily suspended.”
Sheila Kohler, The Perfect Place
tags: bath

Debora Greger
“I wanted a bath, even if it were dust. A strigil to scrape the skin that I couldn’t crawl out of.”
Debora Greger, Desert Fathers, Uranium Daughters
tags: bath, dust, skin

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Whenever they are given the choice, some people choose a bath over a shower; they, too, would like to do their bit to waste water.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Deyth Banger
“I now watch porn, but I don't have the feeling to go to the bath and start to jerk off. It's the world bad idea ever came. I have quite jerk off and I will quit it's not the way I should live, the same is for you!”
Deyth Banger

“Even dirty water has a bath”
R.W. Erskine

“Happiness is a hot bath on a Sunday afternoon.”
A.D. Posey

Jean Rhys
“There is a porter at the door and at the reception-desk a grey-haired woman and a sleek young man.
'I want a room for tonight.'
'A room? A room with bath?'
I am still feeling ill and giddy. I say confidentially, leaning forward: 'I want a light room.'
The young man lifts his eyebrows and stares at me.
I try again. 'I don't want a room looking on the courtyard. I want a light room.'
'A light room?' the lady says pensively. She turns over the pages of her books, looking for a light room.
'We have number 219,' she says. 'A beautiful room with bath. Seventy-five francs a night.' (God, I can't afford that.) 'It's a very beautiful room with bath. Two windows. Very light,' she says persuasively.
A girl is called to show me the room. As we are about to start for the lift, the young man says, speaking out of the side of his mouth: 'Of course you know that number 219 is occupied.'
'Oh no. Number 219 had his bill before yesterday.' the receptionist says. 'I remember. I gave it to him myself.'
I listen anxiously to this conversation. Suddenly I feel that I must have number 219, with bath - number 219, with rose-coloured curtains, carpet and bath. I shall exist on a different planet at once if I can get this room, if only for a couple of nights. It will be an omen. Who says you can't escape from your faith? I'll escape from mine, into room number 219. Just try me, just give me a chance.
'He asked for his bill,' the young man says, in a voice which is a triumph of scorn and cynicism. 'He asked for his bill but that doesn't mean that he has gone.'
The receptionist starts arguing. 'When people ask for their bills, it's because they are going, isn't it?'
'Yes,' he says, 'French' people. The others ask for their bills to see if we're going to cheat them.'
'My God,' says the receptionist, 'foreigners, foreigners, my God. ...'
The young man turns his back, entirely dissociating himself from what is going on.
Number 219 - well, now I know all about him. All the time they are talking I am seeing him - his trousers, his shoes, the way he brushes his hair, the sort of girls he likes. His hand-luggage is light yellow and he has a paunch. But I can't see his face. He wears a mask, number 219. ...
'Show the lady number 334.”
Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight
tags: bath, hotel

Katherine Rundell
“Quite suddenly Sophie couldn't bear it. She pelted up to her bedroom, tripping over the stairs. The tears in her eyes were making the world blur... She stamped and kicked...

It took her some minutes to realize that Charles was standing in the doorway... 'This calls for hot water... Get in the tub, Sophie, and do some splashing. You will be surprised at what a difference splashing can make.”
Katherine Rundell, Rooftoppers
tags: bath

“Sink not into oblivion, but sink into a nice hot spa.”
Anthony T. Hincks

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