Victorian Quotes

Quotes tagged as "victorian" Showing 1-30 of 150
Bernie Mcgill
“Some ghosts are so quiet you would hardly know they were there.”
Bernie Mcgill, The Butterfly Cabinet

Oscar Wilde
“One must have a heart of stone to read the death of little Nell without laughing.”
Oscar Wilde

Charles Dickens
“There are very few moments in a man's existence when he experiences so much ludicrous distress, or meets with so little charitable commiseration, as when he is in pursuit of his own hat.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

Gail Carriger
“What if all those strange and unexplainable bends in history were the result of supernatural interference? At which point I asked myself, what's the weirdest most eccentric historical phenomenon of them all? Answer:the Great British Empire. Clearly, one tiny little island could only conquer half the known world with supernatural aid. Those absurd Victorian manners and ridiculous fashions were obviously dictated by vampires. And, without a doubt, the British army regimental system functions on werewolf pack dynamics.”
Gail Carriger

Lisa Kleypas
“I’m going to take Charity to France. I can look after her there. You can go on with your life here, and I won’t be here to … to bother anyone.”
He muttered two quiet words.
“What?” she asked in bewilderment, inching forward to hear him.
“I said, try it.”
Lisa Kleypas, Marrying Winterborne

Sara Sheridan
“I'm accustomed to reading Georgian and Victorian letters and sometimes you simply know in your gut that a blithe sentence is covering up a deeper emotion.”
Sara Sheridan

Charles Dickens
“And here you see me working out, as cheerfully and thankfully as I may, my doom of sharing in the glass a constant change of customers, and of lying down and rising up with the skeleton allotted to me for my mortal companion.”
Charles Dickens, The Haunted House

George Macaulay Trevelyan
“Enlarged sympathy with children was one of the chief contributions made by the Victorian English to real civilization.”
G.M. Trevelyan

Charlotte Brontë
“I held a brief debate with myself as to whether I should change my ordinary attire for something smarter. At last I concluded it would be a waste of labour. "Doubtless," though I, "she is some stiff old maid ; for though the daughter of Madame Reuter, she may well number upwards of forty winters; besides, if it were otherwise, if she be both young and pretty, I am not handsome, and no dressing can make me so, therefore I'll go as I am." And off I started, cursorily glancing sideways as I passed the toilet-table, surmounted by a looking-glass: a thin irregular face I saw, with sunk, dark eyes under a large, square forehead, complexion destitute of bloom or attraction; something young, but not youthful, no object to win a lady's love, no butt for the shafts of Cupid.”
Charlotte Brontë, The Professor

Robert Liparulo
“Oh, Ed!" Mom exclaimed. "It's a Victorian.”
Robert Liparulo, House of Dark Shadows

John Fowles
“...she was really very pretty, one of the prettiest girls she knew. And as if to prove it she raised her arms and unloosed her hair, a thing she knew to be vaguely sinful, yet necessary, like a hot bath or a warm bed on a winter's night. She imagined herself for a truly sinful moment as someone wicked — a dancer, an actress.”
John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman

John Fowles
“Then she did something as strange, as shocking, as if she had thrown off her clothes.

She smiled.”
John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman

Wendy Wasserstein
“In the world of The Age of Innocence, a financial disaster or moral scandal would permanently exile a guest from the finest dinner tables. In contemporary New York, a mere change of fashion can eliminate a place setting; therefore, the need to maintain a rigidity not of morals, but of taste, seems all the more desperate.”
Wendy Wasserstein

Katherine McIntyre
“Here to arrest me, handsome?” the woman asked, a smirk on her lips as if she wasn’t staring down the end of a barrel.”
Katherine McIntyre, Of Coppers and Cracksmen

Katherine McIntyre
“This close, she could smell the crisp bite of gin on his breath and feel the heat emanating off him. She leaned in and pressed a kiss to his cheek.”
Katherine McIntyre, Of Coppers and Cracksmen

Katherine McIntyre
“Those angels you’ve painted in your mind wouldn’t last for a moment on the streets of London, Mother,” Ellie called out to her. “We’re the devils who stepped in to replace them.”
Katherine McIntyre, Of Coppers and Cracksmen

Gail Carriger
“This resembled hedgehog fur so precisely that Percy, who rarely noticed fashion, was struck momentarily speechless by the shocking similarity between this hat and his mother's Erinaceinae nature.”
Gail Carriger, Reticence

Samuel Butler
“Theobald had proposed to call him George after old Mr Pontifex, but strange to say, Mr Pontifex over-ruled him in favour of the name Ernest. The word 'earnest' was just beginning to come into fashion, and he thought the possession of such a name might, like his having been baptised in water from the Jordan, have a permanent effect upon the boy’s character, and influence him for good during the more critical periods of his life.”
Samuel Butler, The Way of All Flesh

Katherine McIntyre
“Damn and double damn,” Ellie cursed, her feet landing on the ground with a clap. “Look lively, Taylor. We’ve found ourselves privy to one of the most pigeon-livered men you’ll ever meet.”
Katherine McIntyre, Of Coppers and Cracksmen

Kate Morton
“It was a delicate silver frame, small enough to fit within her hand, containing a photograph of a woman. She was young, with long hair, light but not blond, half of which was wound into a loose knot on the top of her head; her gaze was direct, her chin slightly lifted, her cheekbones high. Her lips were set in an attitude of intelligent engagement, perhaps even defiance.
Elodie felt a familiar stirring of anticipation as she took in the sepia tones, the promise of a life awaiting rediscovery. The woman's dress was looser than might be expected for the period. White fabric draped over her shoulders, and the neckline fell in a V. The sleeves were sheer and billowed, and had been pushed to the elbow on one arm. Her wrist was slender, the hand on her hip accentuating the indentation of her waist.
The treatment was as unusual as the subject, for the woman wasn't posed inside on a settee or against a scenic curtain, as one might expect in a Victorian portrait. She was outside, surrounded by dense greenery, a setting that spoke of movement and life. The light was diffuse, the effect intoxicating.”
Kate Morton, The Clockmaker's Daughter

“The true poet is of the hero type, soaring above sensual gratification and rational formulas. The language of poetry has the potential for generating cosmic visions and the optimism of a regenerative belief system.”
Fred Kaplan

Elizabeth Gaskell
“—it seemed as if she could dream her life away in such luxury of pensiveness, in which she made her present all in all, from not daring to think of the past, or wishing to contemplate the future. (Pg 59)”
Elizabeth Gaskell, North & South

“Although it had been several years since, I could still taste the atmosphere of that horrible day. The stench, the braying of the horse in the yard outside, the shuffling and scraping of chairs in the room above, and then the muted mumbling of serious voices. Serious voices that had come upon a seriously wrong conclusion...”
Martin R Jackson : Running with Finn McCool

“The sun was blindingly bright and I hadn’t a care in the world until a solitary black cloud twisted my fantasy to gloom and despondency. I knew that I must shortly return home. I turned the other way, attempting to run—to run and escape, but I was frozen. No matter how hard I tried, my legs had turned to stone and night fell upon me that instant. No stars were out. No moon, just blackness. I was suddenly back in that little attic bedroom of Primrose Cottage, with the smell of freshly extinguished tallow just starting to fade away, supplanted by the pungent odour of that vinegary bastard, my grandfather.”
Martin R Jackson : Running with Finn McCool

“The repetitive drone of the shanty music and raucous banter had stopped dead.
All eyes were upon them.
‘Carry on, boys—don’t let me spoil yer merriment,’ Brady called, rolling his hand around in a barrel-organ gesture.
Then, just like an engine, the whole commotion rumbled up to steam again, the fiddler’s elbow sawing away, concertina pumping and spoons clacking, but no one sang...”
Martin R Jackson : Running with Finn McCool

“Dogs cocked their legs on anything perpendicular, carriages clopped and growled along the cobblestones, and all with the prevailing aroma of rancid fish quietly melding the confusion together...”
Martin R Jackson : Running with Finn McCool

“I thought about addiction. It was a high that you were always chasing, something that you need as desperately as your next breath, something that consumes you entirely for better or for worse. For my father, it was gambling. For Victoria, it was worrying. And for me, it was Alexander Langley.”
A. N. Horton, C is for Conspiracy

“Don't let his gentlemanly airs fool you, Miss Porter. Alex Langley is one of the toughest men I ever met.”
A. N. Horton, B is for Bookies: A Langley & Porter Mystery

Bram Stoker
“However, when we got to the pathway outside the churchyard, where there was a puddle of water, remaining from the storm, I daubed my feet with mud, using each foot in turn on the other, so that as we went home, no one, in case we should meet any one, should notice my bare feet.”
Bram Stoker, Dracula

Bram Stoker
“[...] we got up and walked down Piccadilly. Jonathan was holding me by the arm, the way he used to in the old days before I went to school. I felt it very improper, for you can't go on for some years teaching etiquette and decorum to other girls without the pedantry of it biting into yourself a bit; but it was Jonathan, and he was my husband, and we didn't know anybody who saw us - and we didn't care if they did - so on we walked.”
Bram Stoker, Dracula

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