Charles Dickens Quotes

Quotes tagged as "charles-dickens" Showing 1-30 of 91
Charles Dickens
“A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“Please, sir, I want some more.”
Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

“I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.

(John 11:25-26)”
Anonymous, The Holy Bible: King James Version

Charles Dickens
“I care for no man on earth, and no man on earth cares for me.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Love, though said to be afflicted with blindness, is a vigilant watchman.”
Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

Charles Dickens
“She had curiously thoughtful and attentive eyes; eyes that were very pretty and very good.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us!...”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Eudora Welty
“She read Dickens in the same spirit she would have eloped with him.”
Eudora Welty, One Writer's Beginnings

Charles Dickens
“There are very few moments in a man's existence when he experiences so much ludicrous distress, or meets with so little charitable commiseration, as when he is in pursuit of his own hat.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

Dan Simmons
“When the last autumn of Dickens's life was over, he continued to work through his final winter and into spring. This is how all of us writers give away the days and years and decades of our lives in exchange for stacks of paper with scratches and squiggles on them. And when Death calls, how many of us would trade all those pages, all that squandered lifetime-worth of painfully achieved scratches and squiggles, for just one more day, one more fully lived and experienced day? And what price would we writers pay for that one extra day spent with those we ignored while we were locked away scratching and squiggling in our arrogant years of solipsistic isolation?

Would we trade all those pages for a single hour? Or all of our books for one real minute?”
Dan Simmons, Drood

Charles Dickens
“Good for Christmas-time is the ruddy colour of the cloak in which--the tree making a forest of itself for her to trip through, with her basket--Little Red Riding-Hood comes to me one Christmas Eve to give me information of the cruelty and treachery of that dissembling Wolf who ate her grandmother, without making any impression on his appetite, and then ate her, after making that ferocious joke about his teeth. She was my first love. I felt that if I could have married Little Red Riding-Hood, I should have known perfect bliss. But, it was not to be; and there was nothing for it but to look out the Wolf in the Noah's Ark there, and put him late in the procession on the table, as a monster who was to be degraded.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Tree

Charles Dickens
“In a word, it was impossible for me to separate her, in the past or in the present, from the innermost life of my life.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“The great grindstone, Earth, had turned when Mr. Lorry looked out again, and the sun was red on the courtyard. But, the lesser grindstone stood alone there in the calm morning air, with red upon it that the sun had never give, and would never take away.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“I see Barsad, and Cly, Defarge, The Vengeance, the Juryman, the Judge, long ranks of the new oppressors who have risen on the destruction of the old, perishing by this retributive instrument, before it shall cease out of its present use. I see a beautiful city and brilliant people rising from this abyss, and, in their struggles to be truly free, in their triumphs and defeats, through long long years to come, I see the evil of this time and of the previous time of which this is the natural birth, gradually making explanation for itself and wearing it out. ”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Stephen King
“Of course they had more chains on him than Scrooge saw on Marley's ghost, but he could have kicked up dickens if he'd wanted. That's a pun, son.”
Stephen King, The Green Mile

Truman Capote
“Thackeray's a good writer and Flaubert is a great artist. Trollope is a good writer and Dickens is a great artist. Colette is a very good writer and Proust is a great artist. Katherine Anne Porter was an extremely good writer and Willa Cather was a great artist.”
Truman Capote, Conversations with Capote

Charles Dickens
“Meat, ma'am, meat.”
Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

Dan Simmons
“The day before the Queen's Ball, Father had a visitor--a very young girl with literary aspirations, someone Lord Lytton had recommended visit Father and sent over–and while Father was explaining to her the enjoyment he was having in writing this Drood book for serialisation, this upstart of a girl had the temerity to ask, 'But suppose you died before all the book was written?' [...] He spoke very softly in his kindest voice and said to her, 'One can only work on, you know--work while it is day.”
Dan Simmons, Drood

Conor Cruise O'Brien
“Today, as a result of the policy of Macmillan's Government, Great Britain presents in the United Nations the face of Pecksniff and in Katanga the face of Gradgrind.”
Conor Cruise O'Brien

Charles Dickens
“And here you see me working out, as cheerfully and thankfully as I may, my doom of sharing in the glass a constant change of customers, and of lying down and rising up with the skeleton allotted to me for my mortal companion.”
Charles Dickens, The Haunted House

Charles Dickens
“When I had lain awake a little awhile, those extraordinary voices with which silence teems, began to make themselves audible. The closet whispered, the fireplace sighed, the little washing-stand ticked, and one guitar-string played occasionally in the chest of drawers.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Onları öğüten değirmen gençleri yaşlandıran bir değirmendi; çocukların suratları yüzlerce yıl öncesinden kalma gibiydi, sesleri son derece ciddiydi ve bu yaşlı suratlarda saban izi gibi devam eden her bir çizgide görülen tek bir şey vardı: Açlık. Açlık dört bir yanda hüküm sürüyordu. Açlık, yüksek evlerin dışındaki iplere ya da direklere asılmış içler acısı kıyafetlerdeydi; Açlık, bu kıyafetlerin kâğıttan, samandan, paçavradan ve tahtadan yamalarındaydı; Açlık, adamın testereyle kestiği her ufacık odun parçasında kendini tekrarlıyordu; Açlık, tütmeyen bacalardan aşağıdakileri seyrediyordu; Açlık, çöplerinde zerre kadar yiyecek bulunmayan, leş gibi sokaklarda şaha kalkmış bir dev gibi dikiliyordu. Açlık, fırıncının raflarındaki tek tük bayat ekmeğin üzerine kazılı olan kelimeydi; Açlık, sosis dükkânlarında satılan, ölü köpek etinden yapılmış yiyeceklerdeydi. Açlık, kuru kemiklerini, dönen silindirlerde kebap yapılan kestanelerin arasında takırdatıyordu; Açlık, çeyrek penilik çorba kâsesindeki kendine hayrı olmayan birkaç damla yağ içerisinde kızartılmış sert patates dilimlerinin her bir zerresindeydi.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol & Other Holiday Tales

Charles Dickens
“He’s a going out with the tide,’ said Mr. Peggotty to me, behind his hand.

My eyes were dim and so were Mr. Peggotty’s; but I repeated in a whisper, ‘With the tide?’

‘People can’t die, along the coast,’ said Mr. Peggotty, ‘except when the tide’s pretty nigh out. They can’t be born, unless it’s pretty nigh in—not properly born, till flood. He’s a going out with the tide. It’s ebb at half-arter three, slack water half an hour. If he lives till it turns, he’ll hold his own till past the flood, and go out with the next tide.’

We remained there, watching him, a long time—hours. What mysterious influence my presence had upon him in that state of his senses, I shall not pretend to say; but when he at last began to wander feebly, it is certain he was muttering about driving me to school.

‘He’s coming to himself,’ said Peggotty.

Mr. Peggotty touched me, and whispered with much awe and reverence. ‘They are both a-going out fast.’

‘Barkis, my dear!’ said Peggotty.

‘C. P. Barkis,’ he cried faintly. ‘No better woman anywhere!’

‘Look! Here’s Master Davy!’ said Peggotty. For he now opened his eyes.

I was on the point of asking him if he knew me, when he tried to stretch out his arm, and said to me, distinctly, with a pleasant smile:

‘Barkis is willin’!’

And, it being low water, he went out with the tide.”
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

James Joyce
“Like distant music these words that he had written years before were borne towards him from the past.”
James Joyce, The Dead

Charles Dickens
“And what's the best of all, you've been more comfortable alonger me, since I was under a dark cloud, than when the sun shone. That's best of all.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

“Rockwell once said, 'The commonplaces of America are to me the richest subjects in art.' His paintings depict the dignity of everyday people, like the books of Charles Dickens, who in many ways was like Rockwell, appreciated by the masses in his lifetime, but not until after death by critics, and they were both the most fabulous storytellers....”
Karen Weinreb, The Summer Kitchen

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