F Scott Fitzgerald Quotes

Quotes tagged as "f-scott-fitzgerald" (showing 1-30 of 63)
F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Show me a hero, and I'll write you a tragedy.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since.
"Whenever you feel like criticizing any one," he told me, "just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Ernest Hemingway
“I write one page of masterpiece to ninety-one pages of shit. I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.”
Ernest Hemingway

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Human sympathy has its limits.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Things to worry about:

Worry about courage
Worry about cleanliness
Worry about efficiency
Worry about horsemanship

Things not to worry about:

Don’t worry about popular opinion
Don’t worry about dolls
Don’t worry about the past
Don’t worry about the future
Don’t worry about growing up
Don’t worry about anybody getting ahead of you
Don’t worry about triumph
Don’t worry about failure unless it comes through your own fault
Don’t worry about mosquitoes
Don’t worry about flies
Don’t worry about insects in general
Don’t worry about parents
Don’t worry about boys
Don’t worry about disappointments
Don’t worry about pleasures
Don’t worry about satisfactions

Things to think about:

What am I really aiming at?
How good am I really in comparison to my contemporaries in regard to:

(a) Scholarship
(b) Do I really understand about people and am I able to get along with them?
(c) Am I trying to make my body a useful instrument or am I neglecting it?

With dearest love,

Daddy”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“I was a little shocked at the elaborateness of the lie.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“It’s just that I feel so sad these wonderful nights. I sort of feel they’re never coming again, and I’m not really getting all I could out of them.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“We want to believe. Young students try to believe in older authors, constituents try to believe in their congressmen, countries try to believe in their statesmen, but they can't. Too many voices, too much scattered, illogical, ill-considered criticism. It's worse in the case of newspapers. Any rich, unprogressive old party with that particularly grasping, acquisitive form of mentality known as financial genius can own a paper that is the intellectual meat and drink of thousands of tired, hurried men, men too involved in the business of modern living to swallow anything but predigested food. For two cents the voter buys his politics, prejudices and philosophy. A year later there is a new political ring or a change in the paper's ownership, consequence: more confusion, more contradiction, a sudden inrush of new ideas, their tempering, their distillation, the reaction against them -”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“My whole theory of writing I can sum up in one sentence. An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmasters of ever afterward.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“You’ll understand why storms are named after people.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

Elizabeth Hardwick
“They had created themselves together, and they always saw themselves, their youth, their love, their lost youth and lost love, their failures and memories, as a sort of living fiction.”
Elizabeth Hardwick, Seduction and Betrayal: Women and Literature

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“There's only one lesson to be learned form life, anyway," interrupted Gloria, not in contradiction but in a sort of melancholy agreement.
"What's that?" demanded Maury sharply.
"That there's no lesson to be learned from life.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Now he realized the truth: that sacrifice was no purchase of freedom. It was like a great elective office, it was like an inheritance of power - to certain people at certain times an essential luxury, carrying with it not a guarantee but a responsibility, not a security but an infinite risk. Its very momentum might drag him down to ruin - the passing of the emotional wave that made it possible might leave the one who made it high and dry forever on an island of despair...Sacrifice by its very nature was arrogant and impersonal; sacrifice should be eternally supercilious.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

Laura Lippman
“...Baltimore. It's imperfect. Boy, is it imperfect. And there are parts of its past that make you wince. It's not all marble steps and waitresses calling you 'hon,' you know. Racial strife in the sixties, the riots during the Civil War. F. Scott Fitzgerald said it was civilized and gay, rotted and polite. The terms are slightly anachronistic now, but I think he was essentially right.”
Laura Lippman, Hardly Knew Her

Elizabeth Hardwick
“In this couple defects were multiplied, as if by a dangerous doubling; weakness fed upon itself without a counterstrength and they were trapped, defaults, mutually committed, left holes everywhere in their lives. When you read their letters to each other it is often necessary to consult the signature in order to be sure which one has done the writing. Their tone about themselves, their mood, is the fatal one of nostalgia--a passive, consuming, repetitive poetry. Sometimes one feels even its most felicitious and melodious moments are fixed, rigid in experession, and that their feelings have gradually merged with their manner, fallen under the domination of style. Even in their suffering, so deep and beyond relief, their tonal memory controls the words, shaping them into the Fitzgerald tune, always so regretful, regressive, and touched with a careful felicity.”
Elizabeth Hardwick, Seduction and Betrayal: Women and Literature

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Suddenly he was inside the radius of her perfume and kissing her breathlessly.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, First Blood

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Daddy's girl. Was it a 'itty-bitty bravekins and did it suffer? Oooooo-tweet, de tweetest thing, wasn't she dest too tweet? Before her tiny fist the forces of lust and corruption rolled away; nay, the very march of destiny stopped; inevitably became inevitable, syllogism, dialectic, all rationality fell away”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“He was changed as completely as Amory Blaine could ever be changed. Amory plus Beatrice plus two years in Minneapolis - these had been his ingredients when he entered St. Regis'. But the Minneapolis years were not a thick enough overlay to conceal the "Amory plus Beatrice" from the ferreting eyes of a boarding school, so St. Regis' had very painfully drilled Beatrice out of him and begun to lay down new and more conventional planking on the fundamental Amory. But both St. Regis' and Amory were unconscious of the fact that this fundamental Amory had not in himself changed. Those qualities for which he had suffered: his moodiness, his tendency to pose, his laziness, and his love of playing the fool, were now taken as a matter of course, recognized eccentricities in a star quarter-back, a clever actor, and the editor of the "St. Regis' Tattler"; it puzzled him to see impressionable small boys imitating the very vanities that had not long ago been contemptible weaknesses.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

“EFFERVESCENCE AND EVANESCENCE

We've found this Scott Fitzgerald chap
A chipper charming child;
He's taught us how the flappers flap,
And why the whipper-snappers snap,
What makes the women wild.
But now he should make haste to trap
The ducats in his dipper.
The birds that put him on the map
Will shortly all begin to rap
And flop to something flipper.”
Keith Preston, Splinters

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“...'if the girl had been worth having she'd have waited for you'? No, sir, the girl really worth having won't wait for anybody.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Deepest of all in her personality was the golden radiance that she diffused around her. As an open fire in a dark room throws romance and pathos into the quiet faces at its edge, so she cast her lights and shadows around the rooms that held her.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“I want to write something new - something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.
As usual,
F. Scott Fitzgerald”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Her beauty was cool as this damp breeze, as the moist softness of her own lips.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“He seduces her because she is slipping away - she lets herself be seduced because of overwhelming admiration. Once settled, it is sensual, breathless, immediate, then gentle and tender for a while.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“Our thoughts were frosty mist along the eaves; our two ghosts kissed, high on the long, mazed wires - eerie half-laughter echoes here and leaves only a fatuous sigh for young desires; regret has followed after things she loved, leaving the great husk.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“But Amory, being on the spot, leaned over quickly and kissed Myra’s cheek. He had never kissed a girl before, and he tasted his lips curiously, as if he had munched some new fruit. Then their lips brushed like young wild flowers in the wind.
‘We’re Awful,’ rejoiced Myra gently. she slipped her hand into his, her dead drooped against his shoulder. Sudden revulsion seized Amory, disgust, loathing for the whole incident. He desired frantically to be away, never to see Myra again, never to kiss anyone; he became conscious of his face and hers, of their clinging hands, and he wanted to creep out of his body and hide somewhere safe out of sight, up in the corner of his mind.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“[About Ernest Hemingway] He’s a peach of a fellow and absolutely first-rate.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“I wish I was in print. It will be odd a year or so from now when Scottie assures her friends I was an author and finds that no book is procurable.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, A Life in Letters

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“He felt that he was leaving behind him his chance of being a certain type of artist. It seemed so much more important to be a certain sort of man.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“What must love itself in its fullness, its perfection be. He did not know that what he was experiencing then, that unreal, undesirous medley of ecstasy and peace, would be unrecapturable forever.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Love in the Night

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