Nudge Quotes

Quotes tagged as "nudge" (showing 1-14 of 14)
James Patterson
“I want to do it too!" (sitting motionless)
Nudge: "Nope, you stand out like a fart in a church."
Max: (muttering) "Appropriately enough."
Iggy: "What about me?" (stands still)
Max: "No, you're visible."
Iggy: "Am not!"
Max: (throws a pinecone at him) "Could I do that if I wouldn't see you?”
James Patterson, The Final Warning

James Patterson
“I didn't know a van could go up on two wheels like that, for so long." -Nudge”
James Patterson, The Angel Experiment

J.K. Rowling
“Harry and Hermione are very platonic friends. But I won't answer for anyone else, nudge-nudge wink-wink!”
J.K. Rowling

James Patterson
“You mean other than the wings? I once ate nine snicker bars in a row without barfing. It was a record.”
James Patterson

Patricia Briggs
“So,” he said, shaking his head. “I’m too much for you. You should have said something. We might be married, Mercy, but no still means no.”

I widened my eyes at him. “I just haven’t wanted to hurt your feelings.”

“When I give you that little nudge, hmm?” His voice took on a considering air. “Come to think of it, I’m feeling a little nudge coming on right now.”

“Now?” I whispered in horrified tones. I looked up toward Jesse’s room. “Think of the children.”

He tilted his head as if to listen, then shook it. “They won’t hear anything from there.” He started slowly down the stairs.

“Think of Darryl, Zack, Lucia, and Joel,” I said earnestly. “They’ll be scarred for life.”

“You know what they say about werewolves,” he told me gravely, stepping down to the ground.

I broke and ran—and he was right on my tail. Figuratively speaking, of course. I don’t have a tail unless I’m in my coyote shape.”
Patricia Briggs, Fire Touched

Patricia Briggs
“I returned Zack’s hug, and he slipped something into my pocket that felt like one of the vials I’d just bought. He stepped back, looked me earnestly in the eye, and said, “To protect you from the nudge.”

Darryl high-fived him as he stepped out on the porch. It made Adam laugh.”
Patricia Briggs, Fire Touched
tags: nudge

James Patterson
“Nope, you stick out like a fart in a church.”
James Patterson, The Final Warning

James Patterson
“I look like prep school Barbie," Nudge complained, as she entered the kitchen. She caught sight of me in my uniform and looked mollified. "Actually, you like prep school Barbie. I'm just Barbie's friend.
James Patterson, School's Out—Forever

Ashley Herring Blake
“She felt raw, a painting that wasn't dry yet. One hard nudge and she'd smear all over the place.”
Ashley Herring Blake, Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World

Paul Gibbons
“Behaviorism was a busted flush, but neo-behaviorist theories, especially choice architecture, achieve behavioral change without coercion or the downsides of carrots and sticks.”
Paul Gibbons, The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture

James Patterson
“I called for back up,” Nudge said. “The police, fire department, paramedics, and a few different pizza delivery places are all on their way.”
James Patterson

Paul Gibbons
“The key to behavioral change is to pass behavioral control to the environment.”
Paul Gibbons, The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture

“A choice architect has the responsibility for organizing the context in which people make decisions. [T]here are many parallels between choice architecture and more traditional forms of architecture. A crucial parallel is that there is no such thing as a “neutral” design. [A]s good architects know, seemingly arbitrary decisions, such as where to locate the bathrooms, will have subtle influences on how the people who use the building interact. [S]mall and apparently insignificant details can have major impacts on people’s behavior. [I]n many cases, the power of these small details comes from focusing the attention of users in a particular direction. Good architects realize that although they can’t build the perfect building, they can make some design choices that will have beneficial effects. And just as a building architect must eventually build some particular building, a choice architect must [for example] choose a particular arrangement of food options at lunch, and by so doing she can influence what people eat. She can nudge.”
Richard H. Thaler, Cass R. Sunstein

“Can subliminal advertising be seen as a form of libertarian paternalism? After all, it steers people’s choices, but it does not make their decisions for them. So do we embrace subliminal advertising—so long as it is in the interest of desirable ends? [C]ompare subliminal advertising to something just as cunning. If you want people to lose weight, one effective strategy is to put mirrors in the cafeteria. When people see themselves in the mirror, they may eat less if they are chubby. Is this okay? And if mirrors are acceptable, what about mirrors that are intentionally unflattering? Are such mirrors an acceptable strategy in the cafeteria? If so, what should we think about flattering mirrors in a fast food restaurant?”
Richard H. Thaler, Cass R. Sunstein