Measurement Quotes

Quotes tagged as "measurement" Showing 1-30 of 91
Sigmund Freud
“It is impossible to escape the impression that people commonly use false standards of measurement — that they seek power, success and wealth for themselves and admire them in others, and that they underestimate what is of true value in life.”
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents

Christopher Hitchens
“Even if it were possible to cast my horoscope in this one life, and to make an accurate prediction about my future, it would not be possible to 'show' it to me because as soon as I saw it my future would change by definition. This is why Werner Heisenberg's adaptation of the Hays Office—the so-called principle of uncertainty whereby the act of measuring something has the effect of altering the measurement—is of such importance. In my case the difference is often made by publicity. For example, and to boast of one of my few virtues, I used to derive pleasure from giving my time to bright young people who showed promise as writers and who asked for my help. Then some profile of me quoted someone who disclosed that I liked to do this. Then it became something widely said of me, whereupon it became almost impossible for me to go on doing it, because I started to receive far more requests than I could respond to, let alone satisfy. Perception modifies reality: when I abandoned the smoking habit of more than three decades I was given a supposedly helpful pill called Wellbutrin. But as soon as I discovered that this was the brand name for an antidepressant, I tossed the bottle away. There may be successful methods for overcoming the blues but for me they cannot include a capsule that says: 'Fool yourself into happiness, while pretending not to do so.' I should actually want my mind to be strong enough to circumvent such a trick.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir

Johannes Kepler
“I used to measure the skies, now I measure the shadows of Earth.
Although my mind was sky-bound, the shadow of my body lies here.

[Epitaph he composed for himself a few months before he died]”
Johannes Kepler

Toba Beta
“Judgmental heart has lack of introspection.”
Toba Beta, My Ancestor Was an Ancient Astronaut

Toba Beta
“Judging others is just wasting your time,
giving your advice to men who don't pay.”
Toba Beta, My Ancestor Was an Ancient Astronaut

Roger Lowenstein
“Buffett found it 'extraordinary' that academics studied such things. They studied what was measurable, rather than what was meaningful. 'As a friend [Charlie Munger] said, to a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”
Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist

“Every line is the perfect length if you don't measure it.”
Marty Rubin

Pooja Agnihotri
“One of the most common reasons for a product failure is poor audience research.”
Pooja Agnihotri, 17 Reasons Why Businesses Fail :Unscrew Yourself From Business Failure

Pooja Agnihotri
“Organizational structure and management style are those two factors that we always forget to analyze when the performance of our businesses goes down.”
Pooja Agnihotri, 17 Reasons Why Businesses Fail :Unscrew Yourself From Business Failure

Alan W. Watts
“Thought and science are therefore raising problems which their terms of study can never answer, many of which are doubtless problems only for thought. The trisection of an angle is similarly an insoluble problem only for compass and straight-edge construction, and Achilles cannot overtake the tortoise so long as their progress is considered piecemeal, endlessly having the distance between them. However, as it is not Achilles but the method of measurement which fails to catch up with the tortoise, so it is not man but his method of thought which fails to find fulfillment in experience.”
Alan Wilson Watts, Nature, Man and Woman

Vera Nazarian
“Science uses the Red Shift to measure deep cosmic distances. But how to measure deep historic time? How about—the Saffron Shift.

If history itself had a color, it is . . . like wood or bark, or living forest floor.

Assigning hues to time periods, the sum total of history is saffron-brown—but the chromatic arc starts from blinding white (prehistory) to sun-yellow (Ancient Greece), then deepening to pale wood tones (Dark Ages) and finally exploding like an infinite chord into a full brown palette that includes mahoganies, siennas (Middle Ages), oak, sandalwood (the Renaissance), cherry, maple (Age of Reason), and near-black old woods (Industrial Revolution) for which there may not be names.

As time approaches our own, the wood-brown palette fades to a weird glassy colorlessness, goes black-and-white for a brief span as you think of photographs of your grandparents, and then again fades until we get a clear medium that is the color of the world.

And the present moment is perfectly transparent.

It's only as you start looking into the future, that the colors start returning. The glass is turning silvery with a murky haze, and there is blue somewhere in the distance . . .”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Toba Beta
“For millenia, scientists always try to measure
the size of this vast universe. One way to know
that is first to find the smallest single thing that
constructs this universe. When they get it, the
real measurement of universe can be understood for sure.”
Toba Beta, My Ancestor Was an Ancient Astronaut

“We are the measure of nothing and nothing measures us.”
Marty Rubin

Philip Ball
“[Q]uantum objects present us with a choice of languages, but it’s too easily forgotten that this is precisely what it is: a struggle to formulate the right words, not a description of the reality behind them. Quantum objects are not sometimes particles and sometimes waves, like a football fan changing her team allegiance according to last week’s results. Quantum objects are what they are, and we have no reason to suppose that ‘what they are’ changes in any meaningful way depending on how we try to look at them. Rather, all we can say is that what we measure sometimes looks like what we would expect to see if we were measuring discrete little ball-like entities, while in other experiments it looks like the behaviour expected of waves of the same kind as those of sound travelling in air, or that wrinkle and swell on the sea surface. So the phrase ‘wave–particle duality’ doesn’t really refer to quantum objects at all, but to the interpretation of experiments – which is to say, to our human-scale view of things.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“[T]he wavefunction of the electron in [a] box can penetrate into the walls. If the walls aren’t too thick, the wavefunction can actually extend right through them, so that it still has a non-zero value on the outside. What this tells you is that there is a small chance – equal to the amplitude of the wavefunction squared in that part of space – that if you make a measurement of where the electron is, you might find it within the wall, or even outside the wall.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“[A]tomic nuclei are pretty hard to peer into. But that’s not the root of the problem. It’s that we simply can’t, for quantum processes, talk about a historical progression of events that led to a given outcome. There’s no story of how it ‘got’ to be that way.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“The wavefunction of superposed states doesn’t say anything about what the photon is ‘like’. It is a tool for letting you predict what you will measure. And what you will measure for a superposed state like this is that sometimes the measurement device registers a photon with a vertical polarization, and sometimes with a horizontal one. If the superposed state is described by a wavefunction that has an equal weighting of the vertical and horizontal wavefunctions, then 50% of your measurements will give the result ‘vertical’ and 50% will indicate ‘horizontal’. If you accept Bohr’s rigour/complacency (delete to taste), we don’t need to worry what the superposed state ‘is’ before making a measurement, but can just accept that such a state will sometimes give us one result and sometimes another, with a probability defined by the weightings of the superposed wavefunctions in the Schrödinger equation. It all adds up to a consistent picture.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“[W]hereas we might have been content enough to believe that electrons in a bright beam are wave-like and can be diffracted by the double slits, it is hard to understand how one-by-one passage of what seem to be particles (judging from the discrete bright spots that appear on the screen) can produce wave-like interference. We’re forced to conclude that ‘wave-like’ electrons can interfere with themselves.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“So long as we don’t try to figure out which slit [electrons] go through, they will behave as if they go through both at once. But if we try to pin down which slit they pass through, they only go through one. The mere act of making the measurement – even if we can be pretty sure that the measurement shouldn’t obstruct or influence the electron’s path – appears to turn a wave into a particle. Yes, appears to. Does the electron really pass through both slits at once when we’re not looking at its path? Does it change from wave to particle when we do look? These are, according to Bohr’s view of quantum mechanics, illegitimate questions, precisely because they are insisting on some microscopic description underlying the measurements we make. Bohr argued that there is nothing in quantum mechanics that permits us to formulate such a description. That is not what the Schrödinger equation is about. It just predicts the outcomes of measurements.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“Everything that seems strange about quantum mechanics comes down to measurement. If we take a look, the quantum system behaves one way. If we don’t, the system does something else. What’s more, different ways of looking can elicit apparently mutually contradictory answers. If we look at a system one way, we see this; but if we look at the same system another way, we see not merely that but not this. The object went through one slit; no, it went through both. How can that be? How can ‘the way nature behaves’ depend on how – or if – we choose to observe it?”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“We know that measurements of a quantum system seem to collapse the wavefunction. We most certainly don’t know how, or why, or indeed if that actually happens.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“Quantum objects may in principle have a number of observable properties, but we can’t gather them all (Copenhagenists might in fact say ‘elicit them’) in a single go, because they can’t all exist at once. And by gathering some we may scramble the values of others.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“[T]he probabilistic nature of the Schrödinger equation, which predicts only the likelihood of different experimental outcomes, leaves it offering no reason why one specific outcome is observed instead of another. In effect, it says that quantum events (the radioactive decay of an atom, say) happen for no reason.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“Einstein and his colleagues made the perfectly reasonable assumption of locality: that the properties of a particle are localized on that particle, and what happens here can’t affect what happens there without some way of transmitting the effects across the intervening space. It seems so self-evident that it hardly appears to be an assumption at all. But this locality is just what quantum entanglement undermines – which is why ‘spooky action at a distance’ is precisely the wrong way to look at it. We can’t regard particle A and particle B in the EPR experiment as separate entities, even though they are separated in space. As far as quantum mechanics is concerned, entanglement makes them both parts of a single object. Or to put it another way, the spin of particle A is not located solely on A in the way that the redness of a cricket ball is located on the cricket ball. In quantum mechanics, properties can be non-local. Only if we accept Einstein’s assumption of locality do we need to tell the story in terms of a measurement on particle A ‘influencing’ the spin of particle B. Quantum non-locality is the alternative to that view.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

Philip Ball
“Here is the answer to Einstein’s question about the moon. Yes, it is there when no one observes it – because the environment is already, and without cease, ‘measuring’ it. All of the photons of sunlight that bounce off the moon are agents of decoherence, and more than adequate to fix its position in space and give it a sharp outline. The universe is always looking.”
Philip Ball, Beyond Weird

“Don't you ever imagine?"
"What's the imagination got to do with anything?"
"It's better than your ever increasing accuracies. They're as phoney as silicon boobs. Like proper tits, inaccuracies are much more entertaining.”
Colin Bennett, Entertainment Bomb

“Your success isn't measured by the amount of approvals you get, but the denials you give to your failures pit.”
Goitsemang Mvula

Steven Brust
“Men have invented various names in which to measure distance, and have a certain pleasure in assigning units of one to the other, it is the sense that so many inches toi the spans, and so many spans to the league; in the sense that a league in the Sorannah is almost two leagues within the ancient confines of Seawall, that is, within the barony that once held the city of Dragaera, and, at the time of which we have the honor to write, still held a portion of it; yet. for all of this measurement, it is understood by those who travel and by those who listen to travelers that the meaningful unit by which distance can be measured is time.”
Steven Brust, The Phoenix Guards

“NEVER BE PROUD OF AGE AND MONEY BECAUSE THINGS THAT ARE MEASURED WILL DEFINITELY END SOMETIME.”
SACHIN RAMDAS BHARATIYA

“It takes about half a second to say the word 'jiffy.' That's how long a jiffy should officially be.”
John Alejandro King a.k.a. The Covert Comic

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