Quantum Physics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "quantum-physics" (showing 1-30 of 126)
Albert Einstein
“God does not play dice with the universe.”
Albert Einstein, The Born-Einstein Letters 1916-55

Carl Sagan
“The cosmos is within us. We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the universe to know itself.”
Carl Sagan

Terry Pratchett
“In fact, the mere act of opening the box will determine the state of the
cat, although in this case there were three determinate states the cat
could be in: these being Alive, Dead, and Bloody Furious.”
Terry Pratchett, Lords and Ladies

Albert Einstein
“As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
Albert Einstein

Bill Bryson
“Protons give an atom its identity, electrons its personality.”
Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

Stephen Hawking
“Not only does God play dice but... he sometimes throws them where they cannot be seen.”
Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking
“So Einstein was wrong when he said, "God does not play dice." Consideration of black holes suggests, not only that God does play dice, but that he sometimes confuses us by throwing them where they can't be seen.”
Stephen Hawking

Jeremy Aldana
“Theology, philosophy, metaphysics, and quantum physics are merely ways for God to have his smart people believe in him”
Jeremy Aldana

Kevin Michel
“Small shifts in your thinking, and small changes in your energy, can lead to massive alterations of your end result.”
Kevin Michel, Moving Through Parallel Worlds To Achieve Your Dreams

Werner Heisenberg
“[T]he atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts.”
Werner Heisenberg

John Gribbin
“In the world of the very small, where particle and wave aspects of reality are equally significant, things do not behave in any way that we can understand from our experience of the everyday world...all pictures are false, and there is no physical analogy we can make to understand what goes on inside atoms. Atoms behave like atoms, nothing else.”
John Gribbin, In Search of Schrödinger's Cat: Quantum Physics and Reality

Kevin Michel
“The more we delve into quantum mechanics the stranger the world becomes; appreciating this strangeness of the world, whilst still operating in that which you now consider reality, will be the foundation for shifting the current trajectory of your life from ordinary to extraordinary. It is the Tao of mixing this cosmic weirdness with the practical and physical, which will allow you to move, moment by moment, through parallel worlds to achieve your dreams.”
Kevin Michel, Moving Through Parallel Worlds To Achieve Your Dreams

Patrick Rothfuss
“The law of sympathy is one of the most basic parts of magic. It states that the more similar two objects are, the greater the sympathetic link. The greater the link, the more easily they influence each other.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“‎In modern physics, there is no such thing as "nothing." Even in a perfect vacuum, pairs of virtual particles are constantly being created and destroyed. The existence of these particles is no mathematical fiction. Though they cannot be directly observed, the effects they create are quite real. The assumption that they exist leads to predictions that have been confirmed by experiment to a high degree of accuracy.”
Richard Morris

Michio Kaku
“[On the practical applications of particle physics research with the Large Hadron Collider.]

Sometimes the public says, 'What's in it for Numero Uno? Am I going to get better television reception? Am I going to get better Internet reception?' Well, in some sense, yeah. ... All the wonders of quantum physics were learned basically from looking at atom-smasher technology. ... But let me let you in on a secret: We physicists are not driven to do this because of better color television. ... That's a spin-off. We do this because we want to understand our role and our place in the universe.”
Michio Kaku

Amit Ray
“The purpose of quantum computing based compassionate artificial intelligence is to develop integrated systems that can preserve and enhance human values of peace, love, happiness and freedom.”
Amit Ray, Compassionate Artificial Superintelligence AI 5.0 - AI with Blockchain, BMI, Drone, IOT, and Biometric Technologies

Lawrence M. Krauss
“At the heart of quantum mechanics is a rule that sometimes governs politicians or CEOs - as long as no one is watching, anything goes.”
Lawrence M. Krauss

Amit Ray
“Life is a field of cosmic consciousness, expressing itself in million ways in space-time through quantum entanglement”
Amit Ray, Beautify your Breath - Beautify your Life

Marcus du Sautoy
“The wave quality of light is the same as that of the electron. The wave determines the probable location of the photon of light when it is detected. The wave character of light is not vibrating stuff like a wave of water but rather a wavelike function encoding information about where you'll find the photon of light once it is detected. Until it reaches the detector plate, like the electron, it is seemingly passing through both slits simultaneously, making its mind up about its location only once it is observed [...].
It's this act of observation that is such a strange feature of quantum physics. Until I ask the detector to pick up where the electron is, the particle should be thought of as probabilistically distributed over space, with a probability described by a mathematical function that has wavelike characteristics. The effect of the two slits on this mathematical wave function alters it in such a way that the electron is forbidden from being located at some points on the detector plate. But when the particle is observed, the die is cast, probabilities disappear, and the particle must decide on a location.”
Marcus du Sautoy, The Great Unknown: Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science

“There's lots of ways to prove that God exist and that he plays dice with the universe.”
Joshua Daniel Asinero

Julieanne O'Connor
“In a world full of oddities, it’s how you outdo yourself within your own schizophrenia of abnormalities, that determines your most interesting self.”
Julieanne O'Connor

Marcus du Sautoy
“One of the most curious consequences of quantum physics is that a particle like an electron can seemingly be in more than one place at the same time until it is observed, at which point there seems to be a random choice made about where the particle is really located. Scientists currently believe that this randomness is genuine, not just caused by a lack of information. Repeat the experiment under the same conditions and you may get a different answer each time.”
Marcus du Sautoy, The Great Unknown: Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science

John Gribbin
“Heisenberg's uncertainty relation measures the amount by which the complementary descriptions of the electron, or other fundamental entities, overlap. Position is very much a particle property - particles can be located precisely. Waves, on the other hand, have no precise location, but they do have momentum. The more you know about the wave aspect of reality, the less you know about the particle, and vice versa. Experiments designed to detect particles always detect particles; experiments designed to detect waves always detect waves. No experiment shows the electron behaving like a wave and a particle at the same time.”
John Gribbin, In Search of Schrödinger's Cat: Quantum Physics and Reality

Marcus du Sautoy
“If, years later, I do use the slit detector to observe which way the electron went, it will mean that many years earlier the electron must have passed through one slit or the other. But if I don't use the "slit detector," then the electron must have passed through both slits. This is, of course, extremely weird. My actions at the beginning of the twenty-first century can change what happened thousands of years ago when the electron began its journey. It seems that just as there are multiple futures, there are also multiple pasts, and my acts of observation in the present can decide what happened in the past. As much as it challenges any hope of ever really knowing the future, quantum physics asks whether I can ever really know the past. It seems that the past is also in a superposition of possibilities that crystallize only once they are observed.”
Marcus du Sautoy, The Great Unknown: Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science

“We are not talking about waves or particles, what we are talking about is a quantum of action in a field. This thing we call a particle is a quantum of action that becomes more focused by a process we have not described and this thing we call a wave is the potential in the field. How can a wave be quantized? The wave is a precise ratio of potential.”
Rick Delmonico, The Philosophy of Fractals

“Light bulbs are very, VERY complicated.”
Jerry Fodor

Marcus du Sautoy
“To understand this new frontier, I will have to try to master one of the most difficult and counterintuitive theories ever recorded in the annals of science: quantum physics. Listen to those who have spent their lives immersed in this world and you will have a sense of the challenge we face. After making his groundbreaking discoveries in quantum physics, Werner Heisenberg recalled, "I repeated to myself again and again the question: Can nature possibly be so absurd as it seemed to us in these atomic experiments?" Einstein declared after one discovery, "If it is correct it signifies the end of science." Schrödinger was so shocked by the implications of what he'd cooked up that he admitted, "I do not like it and I am sorry I had anything to do with it." Nevertheless, quantum physics is now one of the most powerful and well-tested pieces of science on the books. Nothing has come close to pushing it off its pedestal as one of the great scientific achievements of the last century. So there is nothing to do but to dive headfirst into this uncertain world. Feynman has some good advice for me as I embark on my quest: "I am going to tell you what nature behaves like. If you will simply admit that maybe she does behave like this, you will find her a delightful, entrancing thing. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possibly avoid it, 'But how can it be like that?' because you will get 'down the drain,' into a blind alley from which nobody has yet escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that.”
Marcus du Sautoy, The Great Unknown: Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science

Marcus du Sautoy
“If I keep observing the uranium, which means a little more than keeping my eyes on the pot on my desk and involves something akin to surrounding it with a whole system of Geiger counters, I can freeze it in such a way that it stops emitting radiation.
Although Turing first suggested the idea as a theoretical construct, it turns out that it is not just mathematical fiction. Experiments in the last decade have demonstrated the real possibility of using observation to inhibit the progress of a quantum system.”
Marcus du Sautoy, The Great Unknown: Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science

“Holes in the fabric of the universe exist, but they will change over time. Let's hope that we find one before it does.”
Anthony T. Hincks

“If dimensions are virtual like the particles in quantum foam are virtual then, entanglement is information that is in more than one location (hologram).
There are no particles, they may be wave packets but the idea of quantum is, a precise ratio of action in relationship to the environment.
Feynman's path integral is not infinite, it is fractal.
If you look at a star many light years away, the photon that hits your eye leaves the star precisely when the timing for the journey will end at your eye because the virtual dimension of the journey is zero distance or zero time. Wheeler said that if your eye is not there to receive the photon then it won't leave the star in the distant past. If the dimension in the direction of travel is zero, you have a different relationship then if it is zero time in terms of the property of the virtual dimensions.

Is a particle really a wave packet?
Could something like a "phase transition" involve dimensions that are more transitory then we imagined.
Example; a photon as a two dimensional sheet is absorbed by an electron so that the photon becomes a part of the geometry of the electron in which the electrons dimensions change in some manner.
Could "scale" have more variation and influence on space and time that our models currently predict?
Could information, scale, and gravity be intimately related?”
R.A. Delmonico

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