Machine Quotes

Quotes tagged as "machine" Showing 1-30 of 108
Brian Selznick
“I like to imagine that the world is one big machine. You know, machines never have any extra parts. They have the exact number and type of parts they need. So I figure if the entire world is a big machine, I have to be here for some reason. And that means you have to be here for some reason, too.”
Brian Selznick, The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Dark Jar Tin Zoo
“To find out if she really loved me, I hooked her up to a lie detector. And just as I suspected, my machine was broken.
”
Dark Jar Tin Zoo, Love Quotes for the Ages. Specifically Ages 19-91.

Jeffrey Eugenides
“Historical fact: People stopped being people in 1913. That was the year Henry Ford put his cars on rollers and made his workers adopt the speed of the assembly line. At first, workers rebelled. They quit in droves, unable to accustom their bodies to the new pace of the age. Since then, however, the adaptation has been passed down: we've all inherited it to some degree, so that we plug right into joy-sticks and remotes, to repetitive motions of a hundred kinds.”
Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

Thomas Jefferson
“What a stupendous, what an incomprehensible machine is man! Who can endure toil, famine, stripes, imprisonment and death itself in vindication of his own liberty, and the next moment . . . inflict on his fellow men a bondage, one hour of which is fraught with more misery than ages of that which he rose in rebellion to oppose.”
Thomas Jefferson, Letters of Thomas Jefferson

Otep Shamaya
“We've become a nation of wolves, ruled by sheep.
Owned by swine, overfed, and put to sleep.
While the media elite declare what to think,
I'll be wide awake, on the edge, and on the brink.”
Otep Shamaya

E.M. Forster
“You talk as if a god had made the Machine," cried the other. "I believe that you pray to it when you are unhappy. Men made it, do not forget that. Great men, but men. The Machine is much, but not everything.”
E.M. Forster, The Machine Stops

Joris-Karl Huysmans
“How inferior the human machine is, compared to man-made machines. They can be decoked, unscrewed, oiled and parts replaced. Decidedly, nature is not a very wonderful thing.”
Joris-Karl Huysmans

E.M. Forster
“Few travelled in these days, for, thanks to the advance of science, the earth was exactly alike all over. Rapid intercourse, from which the previous civilization had hoped so much, had ended by defeating itself. What was the good of going to Peking when it was just like Shrewsbury? Why return to Shrewsbury when it would all be like Peking? Men seldom moved their bodies; all unrest was concentrated in the soul.”
E.M. Forster, The Machine Stops

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
“It is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labour of calculation which could safely be relegated to anyone else if machines were used.

(Describing, in 1685, the value to astronomers of the hand-cranked calculating machine he had invented in 1673.)”
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Brandon Sanderson
“The buzzing was like the eager purr of a muscle car that had just been started, but left in neutral. That was another of Cody’s metaphors for it; I’d said the sensation felt like an unbalanced washing machine filled with a hundred epileptic chimpanzees. Pretty proud of that one.”
Brandon Sanderson, Steelheart

Rachel Corrie
“Sometimes I sit down to dinner with people and I realize there is a massive military machine surrounding us, trying to kill the people I'm having dinner with.”
Rachel Corrie

E.M. Forster
“Vashti was seized with the terrors of direct experience. She shrank back into the room, and the wall closed up again.”
E.M. Forster, The Machine Stops

Marshall McLuhan
“To see a man slip on a banana skin is to see a rationally structured system suddenly translated into a whirling machine.”
Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man

Robert Hughes
“For the machine meant the conquest of horizontal space. It also meant a sense of that space which few people had experienced before – the succession and superimposition of views, the unfolding of landscape in flickering surfaces as one was carried swiftly past it, and an exaggerated feeling of relative motion (the poplars nearby seeming to move faster than the church spire across the field) due to parallax. The view from the train was not the view from the horse. It compressed more motifs into the same time. Conversely, it left less time in which to dwell on any one thing.”
Robert Hughes, The Shock of the New

Françoise Meltzer
“Indeed, woman can be a machine run wild, or a machine can be a better, more subjugated, and efficient woman.”
Francoise Meltzer

Jacques Prévert
“Mees kirjutab masinasse armastuskirja ja masin vastab mehele adressaadi asemel ja tasemel
Nii täiuslik on see masin see tshekkide ja armastuskirjade väljastamismasin
Ja mees kes on mugavasti aset võtnud oma elamismasinas loeb oma lugemismasinaga oma kirjutusmasina vastust
Ja ise koos oma kalkuleerimismasinaga oma unistamismasinas ostab ta ühe armatsemismasina
Ja oma unistusterealiseerimismasinas armatseb ta oma kirjutusmasinaga oma armatsemismasina abil
Kuid masin petab teda ühe generaatoriga
Ühe surnuksnaerutamisegeneraatoriga.”
Jacques Prévert

Steven Magee
“Imagination is my time machine.”
Steven Magee

“How is logic like a machine? Here is how one logician explained it around the turn of the twentieth century: "As a material machine is an instrument for economising the exertion of force, so a symbolic calculus is an instrument for economising the exertion of intelligence." Logic, just like a machine, was a tool for democratizing force: built with enough precision and skill, it could multiply the power of the gifted and the average alike.”
Jimmy Soni, A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age

Steven Magee
“Testing with the CPAP machine revealed that it was triggering altitude sickness symptoms after waking, specifically ‘Descent Fatigue’ during the daytime.”
Steven Magee

Steven Magee
“CPAP never really worked for me and it was a few years later that the medical profession discovered I had positional sleep apnea that needed treatment with a positional device, not a CPAP machine.”
Steven Magee

Rick Riordan
“I figure the universe is basically like a machine. I don't know who made it, if it was the Fates, or the gods, or capital-G God, or whatever. But it chugs along the way it's supposed to most of the time. Sure, little pieces break and stuff goes haywire once in a while, but mostly...things happen for a reason. Like you and me meeting.”
Rick Riordan, The House of Hades

Sudipto Halder
“life without hope is like body without soul. It is no better than a machine or robot.”
Sudipto Halder

Jean Baudrillard
“This is why Warhol is not part of the history of art. He is, quite simply, part of the world. He does not represent it; he is a fragment of it: a fragment in the pure state. This is why, seen from the viewpoint of art, he can be disappointing. Seen as a refraction of our world, he is perfectly self-evident. Like the world itself: looked at from the angle of meaning, the world is thoroughly disappointing. From the angle of appearance and detail, it is perfectly selfevident. And so is the Warhol machine, that extraordinary machine for filtering the world in its material self-evidence.

No one can claim to describe that machine. That would imply a literal complicity, a machinic complicity, with Warhol. Now, not everyone has the good fortune to be a machine.”
Jean Baudrillard, The Perfect Crime

Vikrmn: CA Vikram Verma
“Corporate irony; you will see the best of machines and worst of people ever.”
Vikrmn: CA Vikram Verma, You By You

“Our definition of an atheist as someone who denies perfection has an immediate corollary; he is also someone who denies meaning. If you think about it, meaning is entirely invested in perfection. We expect a perfect being to know the meaning of existence, and be capable of telling us. We expect a perfect evolutionary process to culminate with we ourselves being perfect and knowing everything. Our pursuit of perfection/God is the meaning of life. To be an atheist
is to reject perfection, hence reject meaning. That’s why we brand all atheists as nihilists. They don’t believe in anything. They don’t believe in meaning. And that makes them no different from machines. They are not living beings, or they refuse to be living beings. They are unquestionably high on the autistic spectrum, and they see themselves and the universe as machines rather than living, evolving organisms, getting more and more perfect.”
Mike Hockney, The Sam Harris Delusion

“Our definition of an atheist as someone who denies perfection has an immediate corollary; he is also someone who denies meaning. If you think about it, meaning is entirely invested in perfection. We expect a perfect being to know the meaning of existence, and be capable of telling us. We expect a perfect evolutionary process to culminate with we ourselves being perfect and knowing everything. Our pursuit of perfection/God is the meaning of life. To be an atheist is to reject perfection, hence reject meaning. That’s why we brand all atheists as nihilists. They don’t believe in anything. They don’t believe in meaning. And that makes them no different from machines. They are not living beings, or they refuse to be living beings. They are unquestionably high on the autistic spectrum, and they see themselves and the universe as machines rather than living, evolving organisms, getting more and more perfect.”
Mike Hockney, The Sam Harris Delusion

“The war of the ghosts and the machines is the war between mathematics and science. There can be only one winner – mathematics. Dimensionless mathematics is the noumenal ghost at the heart of the dimensional, phenomenal, scientific machine.”
Mike Hockney, The War of the Ghosts and Machines

“Humanity has dehumanised itself and now sees itself in purely machine terms … from which terrible consequences are flowing. Humanity progressively sees itself in machinelike terms in the belief that this would solve all of our problems, but, in fact, it has simply made them worse.”
Mike Hockney, The War of the Ghosts and Machines

Jean Baudrillard
“Machines produce only machines. The texts, images, films, speech and programmes which come out of the computer are machine products, and they bear the marks of such products: they are artificially padded-out, face-lifted by the machine; the films are stuffed with special effects, the texts full of longueurs and repetitions due to the machine's malicious will to function at all costs (that is its passion), and to the operator's fascination with this limitless possibility of functioning.
Hence the wearisome character in films of all this violence and pornographied sexuality, which are merely special effects of violence and sex, no longer even fantasized by humans, but pure machinic violence.
And this explains all these texts that resemble the work of 'intelligent' virtual agents, whose only act is the act of programming.
This has nothing to do with automatic writing, which played on the magical telescoping of words and concepts, whereas all we have here is the automatism of programming, an automatic run-through of all the possibilities.
It is this phantasm of the ideal performance of the text or image, the possibility of correcting endlessly, which produce in the 'creative artist' this vertige of interactivity with his own object, alongside the anxious vertige at not having reached the technological limits of his possibilities.
In fact, it is the (virtual) machine which is speaking you, the machine which is thinking you.”
Jean Baudrillard, The Intelligence of Evil or the Lucidity Pact

“Right, well. If I’m just another cog, maybe I can’t leave the machine, but from this moment I’m not turning. I’m jammed.”
Jonathan Sims, The Magnus Archives: Season 4

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