Kitchen Quotes

Quotes tagged as "kitchen" Showing 1-30 of 102
Banana Yoshimoto
“Even when I try to stir myself up, I just get irritated because I can't make anything come out. And in the middle of the night I lie here thinking about all this. If I don't get back on track somehow, I'm dead, that's the sense I get. There isn't a single strong emotion inside me.”
Banana Yoshimoto

E.A. Bucchianeri
“There are times when wisdom cannot be found in the chambers of parliament or the halls of academia but at the unpretentious setting of the kitchen table.”
E.A. Bucchianeri

Banana Yoshimoto
“The place I like best in this world is the kitchen. No matter where it is, no matter what kind, if it’s a kitchen, if it’s a place where they make food, it’s fine with me. Ideally it should be well broken in. Lots of tea towels, dry and immaculate. Where tile catching the light (ting! Ting!)”
Banana Yoshimoto, Kitchen

Charlotte Eriksson
“It's the smell of him in the bathroom, all I need to get ready for the day. Watching him get dressed, and the sound in the kitchen; a slow hum of a song and his movements, picking things to eat. The way I could observe him, for hours, just go on with his day – or as he sleeps – simply breathing in and out, in and out, and it's like the hymn that sings me to peace.
I know the world is still out there and I know I'm not yet friendly to its pace, but as long as I know him with me, here, there, somewhere – us – I know I have a chance.”
Charlotte Eriksson

“I was also sick of my neighbors, as most Parisians are. I now knew every second of the morning routine of the family upstairs. At 7:00 am alarm goes off, boom, Madame gets out of bed, puts on her deep-sea divers’ boots, and stomps across my ceiling to megaphone the kids awake. The kids drop bags of cannonballs onto the floor, then, apparently dragging several sledgehammers each, stampede into the kitchen. They grab their chunks of baguette and go and sit in front of the TV, which is always showing a cartoon about people who do nothing but scream at each other and explode. Every minute, one of the kids cartwheels (while bouncing cannonballs) back into the kitchen for seconds, then returns (bringing with it a family of excitable kangaroos) to the TV. Meanwhile the toilet is flushed, on average, fifty times per drop of urine expelled. Finally, there is a ten-minute period of intensive yelling, and at 8:15 on the dot they all howl and crash their way out of the apartment to school.” (p.137)”
Stephen Clarke, A Year in the Merde

Flora Thompson
“Afterwards, they always had tea in the kitchen, much the nicest room in the house.”
Flora Thompson

Dominique Browning
“This is terrific. What a gorgeous kitchen. You’ve decorated it so beautifully. Now you’re going to have to clear all the counters. Vases. Books. Knickknacks. Get rid of all that stuff. I mean, it is just beautiful. Beautiful. I love what you’ve done with this house. Make sure you put it all away.” ~Real estate agent (p.76)”
Dominique Browning, Slow Love: How I Lost My Job, Put on My Pajamas, and Found Happiness

Banana Yoshimoto
“Después cuando al fin lo conocí, pensé que transmitía una sensación de aislamiento, no se por qué. Aunque su forma de ser y de hablar eran dulces, me pareció que estaba solo.”
Banana Yoshimoto

Firoozeh Dumas
“Despite a few exceptions, I have found that Americans are now far more willing to learn new names, just as they're far more willing to try new ethnic foods... It's like adding a few new spices to the kitchen pantry.”
Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

Susan Richards Shreve
“Lucy settled into August's kitchen as if they were a family.”
Susan Richards Shreve, You Are the Love of My Life

Thomas Pynchon
“Параноята е чесънът в кухнята на живота, винаги можеш да сложиш още малко, нали?”
Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge

Banana Yoshimoto
“No me gusta demasiado el sentimentalismo de la palabra 'jamás' ni la sensación que da de determinar el futuro. Pero, entonces, el peso enorme y la desesperanza de la palabra que me había ocurrido: 'jamás, tenían una intensidad difícil de olvidar.”
Banana Yoshimoto, Kitchen

Kate Quinn
“The sight of iniquity, immorality, pure evil, perhaps the world's end; a kitchen in disorder.”
Kate Quinn, The Serpent and the Pearl

Philip Kazan
“Pots hung from the ceiling beams, between the festoons of braided garlic, the hams, the salsicce, bunches of mountain herbs for medicine, strings of dried porcini, necklaces of dried apple rings in winter, chains of dried figs. The smell of onions, of hot lard and smoldering oak wood, of cinnamon and pepper, always seemed to hang in the air. The larder was full of meat at all times, needless to say: not small pieces, but huge joints and sides of beef and lamb, which Mamma and Carenza could never hope to use just for our household, and which were quietly passed on to the monks of Santa Croce so that they could feed the poor. Carenza made salami with fennel seeds and garlic, prosciutto, pancetta. Sometimes the air in the larder was so salty that it stung your nostrils, and sometimes it reeked of spoiled blood from the garlands of hares, rabbits, quail, thrushes and countless other creatures that would arrive, bloody and limp, from Papa's personal game dealer.
Next to the larder, a door led out to our courtyard, which Mamma had kept filled with herbs. An ancient rosemary bush took up most of one side, and the air in summer was always full of bees. Sage, thyme, various kinds of mint, oregano, rocket, hyssop, lovage and basil grew in Mamma's collection of old terra-cotta pots. A fig tree was slowly pulling down the wall, and a tenacious, knotted olive tree had been struggling for years in the sunniest corner.”
Philip Kazan, Appetite

Banana Yoshimoto
“Tanto yo como Shu, en aquellos dos meses, habíamos adquirido una expresión en el rostro que no teníamos antes. La expresión de quien lucha consigo mismo para no pensar en las personas que ha perdido. Acababa poniendo aquella cara sin saberlo, sin darme cuenta, cuando estaba entre unas tinieblas hacia las que venían oleadas de soledad al recordarlo todo de repente.”
Banana Yoshimoto, Kitchen

Lily Prior
La cucina bears the scents of its past, and every event in its history is recorded with an olfactory memorandum. Here vanilla, coffee, nutmeg, and confidences; there the milky-sweet smell of babies, old leather, sheep's cheese, and violets. In the corner by the larder hangs the stale tobacco smell of old age and death, while the salty scent of lust and satiation clings to the air by the cellar steps along with the aroma of soap, garlic, beeswax, lavender, jealousy, and disappointment.”
Lily Prior, La Cucina

Jaspreet Singh
“The kitchen. Scent of cumin, ajwain and cardamom. On the table, a little pile of nutmeg. Thick, oily vapor rose from the pot on the stove. The room was warm and spacious, the window high and wide. Tiny drops of condensation covered the top of the glass. Smoke soared towards the ceiling in shafts of light. I noticed many shiny pots and pans hanging on the whitewashed walls. And strings of lal mirchi, and idli makers, and thalis, and conical molds for kulfi. In the corner the tandoor was ready. Its orange glow stirred in the utensils on the walls.”
Jaspreet Singh, Chef

Joanne Harris
“I made the coffee myself in Armande's curious small kitchen with its cast-iron range and low ceiling. Everything is clean there, but the one tiny window looks onto the river, giving the light a greenish underwater look. Hanging from the dark, unpainted beams are bunches of dry herbs in their muslin sachets. On the whitewashed walls, copper pans hang from hooks. The door- like all the doors in the house- has a hole cut into the base to allow free passage to her cats.”
Joanne Harris, Chocolat

Tom Holt
“Its kitchens were enormous and capable of being put to any use except the convenient preparation of food.”
Tom Holt, Expecting Someone Taller

“মশলার ইহুদি যাজক
যাঁর শ্বাস এক ক্রিয়াপদ,
দাড়ি তাঁর বেশ পাতলা
আর একটা শাদা আলখাল্লা :
আপনি, যিনি রোগা আর ক্ষুদে
আর চেহারা মুঠোর মতো,
এক ইহুদি ধর্মস্হান,
আমাদের তিক্ততাকে আশীর্বাদ করেন,
রান্নাঘরকে শ্রেষ্ঠ করে তুলে
মৃত্যুকে মিষ্টতা দেবার জন্য--
শিখায় আমাদের মোম
আর রুটিতে আমাদের বীজ
আমার দাদু বসে থাকেন
আমার কাকারা পুরে দ্যান
আমার মুখে ছাই ।”
Bert Meyers, In a Dybbuk's Raincoat: Collected Poems

“मसाला यहूदी धर्मगुरु
जिसकी सांस एक क्रिया है,
उनकी दाढ़ी काफी पतली है
और एक लाल लबादा:
आप, जो रोगग्रस्त और क्षुद्र हैं
और चेहरा झाग की तरह है,
एक यहूदी भिक्षु,
हमारी कड़वाहट को आशीर्वाद दें,
किचन को सबसे अच्छा बनाएं
मौत को मिठास देना -
हमें मोम सिखाओ
और रोटी में हमारे बीज
मेरे दादाजी बैठे हैं
मेरा चचेरा भाई भरा हुआ है
मेरे मुँह में ऐश”
Bert Meyers, In a Dybbuk's Raincoat: Collected Poems

“Nature is never the same twice; this inconsistency requires adaptability. There are limitless problems in the world. If we think like a machine we only find ourselves with the same problems. The problems are there because we haven't adapted a solution; the only way to find a solution is to think outside the machine.

This thinking is necessary to a natural food system. There are no two vegetables that are the same, no two days of cooking that are the same, no two humans that are the same. Industrial systems give us the same ingredients every day, through all the seasons. When you put square shapes in square spaces, you don't understand the circle.

Your thinking becomes linear and you can't adapt.

When you adapt, your mind is able to make connections and find solutions to the unpredictable nature of real food.”
Douglas McMaster

“Nature is never the same twice; this inconsistency requires adaptability. There are limitless problems in the world. If we think like a machine we only find ourselves with the same problems. The problems are there because we haven't adapted a solution; the only way to find a solution is to think outside the machine.

This thinking is necessary to a natural food system.

There are no two vegetables that are the same, no two days of cooking that are the same, no two humans that are the same. Industrial systems give us the same ingredients every day, through all the seasons. When you put square shapes in square spaces, you don't understand the circle.

Your thinking becomes linear and you can't adapt.

When you adapt, your mind is able to make connections and find solutions to the unpredictable nature of real food.”
Douglas McMaster, Silo: The Zero Waste Blueprint

Janet Evanovich
“I helped myself to coffee and brought it to the little kitchen table. I'd eaten baby food at that table, and I'd done my homework at it too. The refrigerator and the stove got changed out, but the table remained. It was the heart of the kitchen, and the kitchen was the heart of the house. Even after the attempted kidnapping, the kitchen still felt safe. Even with my mother nipping at the whiskey and my grandmother reading the obits for entertainment, the kitchen felt sane. Going with Grandma's theory, I was pretty confident that all our souls were intact, and that the kitchen was partly responsible for keeping them that way.”
Janet Evanovich, Twisted Twenty-Six

Laurie Lee
“That kitchen, worn by our boots and lives, was scruffy, warm, and low, whose fuss of furniture seemed never the same but was shuffled around each day. A black grate crackled with coal and beech-twigs; towels toasted on the guard; the mantel was littered with fine old china, horse brasses, and freak potatoes. On the floor were strips of muddy matting, the windows were choked with plants, the walls supported stopped clocks and calendars, and smoky fungus ran over the ceilings. There were also six tables of different sizes, some armchairs gapingly stuffed, boxes, stools, and unravelling baskets, books and papers on every chair, a sofa for cats, a harmonium for coats, and a piano for dust and photographs. These were the shapes of our kitchen landscape, the rocks of our submarine life, each object worn smooth by our constant nuzzling, or encrusted by lively barnacles, relics of birthdays and dead relations, wrecks of furniture long since foundered, all silted deep by Mother's newspapers which the years piled round on the floor.”
Laurie Lee, Cider With Rosie

Laurie Lee
“The state of our fire became as important to us as it must have been to a primitive tribe. When it sulked and sank we were filled with dismay; when it blazed all was well with the world; but if – God save us – it went out altogether, then we were clutched by primeval chills.”
Laurie Lee, Cider With Rosie

Lidia Longorio
“My happy place is you teaching me how to dance in the kitchen at two in the morning.”
Lidia Longorio, Hey Humanity

Aspen Matis
“Nights alone in my yellow kitchen, I made myself hot chocolate. I missed my mother. In my window, maple leaves rusted, young fall blooming.”
Aspen Matis

Aspen Matis
“Not pausing, Justin grabbed my laptop and opened applications for me to return to college, the moon framed in our kitchen, winking in the window from behind a slate storm-cloud. He asked me questions from the forms aloud, marking my responses—applying me to schools in New York City.”
Aspen Matis, Your Blue Is Not My Blue: A Missing Person Memoir

Amit Kalantri
“No one became a great cook just by reading the recipes.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

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