Consumer Quotes

Quotes tagged as "consumer" (showing 1-30 of 34)
“If you live for having it all, what you have is never enough.”
Vicki Robin, Your Money or Your Life

Naomi Wolf
“Men who read it [beauty pornography] don't do so because they want women who look like that. The attraction of what they are holding is that it is not a woman, but a two-dimensional woman-shaped blank. The appeal of the material is not the fantasy that the model will come to life; it is precisely that she will not, ever. Her coming to life would ruin the vision. It is not about life.

Ideal beauty is ideal because it does not exist; The action lies in the gap between desire and gratification. Women are not perfect beauties without distance. That space, in a consumer culture, is a lucrative one. The beauty myth moves for men as a mirage, its power lies in its ever-receding nature. When the gap is closed, the lover embraces only his own disillusion.”
Naomi Wolf, The Beauty Myth

“Americans used to be 'citizens.' Now we are 'consumers.”
Vicki Robin, Your Money or Your Life

Kailin Gow
“There are different types of censorship. There is the outright ban on a book type. Then there are the type where the ones who can give it voice, squash it by burying it under search engine algorithms and under other news, videos or books of their own agenda or publication. A smart consumer should be free to choose what to read and what to believe. That choice on a consumer-oriented website, is really what is best for the consumer. - Strong by Kailin Gow”
Kailin Gow

John Twelve Hawks
“I spent my time drinking and staring at a television in the airport bar. More death and destruction. Crime. Pollution. All the news stories were telling me to be frightened. All the commercials were telling me to buy things I didn´t need. The message was that people could only be passive victims or consumers.”
John Twelve Hawks, The Traveler

Ryan Lilly
“Get off the treadmill of consumption, replication, and mediocrity. Begin lifting the weights of creativity, originality, and success.”
Ryan Lilly

“THE ORGANIC FOODS MYTH

A few decades ago, a woman tried to sue a butter company that had printed the word 'LITE' on its product's packaging. She claimed to have gained so much weight from eating the butter, even though it was labeled as being 'LITE'. In court, the lawyer representing the butter company simply held up the container of butter and said to the judge, "My client did not lie. The container is indeed 'light in weight'. The woman lost the case.

In a marketing class in college, we were assigned this case study to show us that 'puffery' is legal. This means that you can deceptively use words with double meanings to sell a product, even though they could mislead customers into thinking your words mean something different. I am using this example to touch upon the myth of organic foods. If I was a lawyer representing a company that had labeled its oranges as being organic, and a man was suing my client because he found out that the oranges were being sprayed with toxins, my defense opening statement would be very simple: "If it's not plastic or metallic, it's organic."

Most products labeled as being organic are not really organic. This is the truth. You pay premium prices for products you think are grown without chemicals, but most products are. If an apple is labeled as being organic, it could mean two things. Either the apple tree itself is free from chemicals, or just the soil. One or the other, but rarely both. The truth is, the word 'organic' can mean many things, and taking a farmer to court would be difficult if you found out his fruits were indeed sprayed with pesticides. After all, all organisms on earth are scientifically labeled as being organic, unless they are made of plastic or metal. The word 'organic' comes from the word 'organism', meaning something that is, or once was, living and breathing air, water and sunlight.

So, the next time you stroll through your local supermarket and see brown pears that are labeled as being organic, know that they could have been third-rate fare sourced from the last day of a weekend market, and have been re-labeled to be sold to a gullible crowd for a premium price. I have a friend who thinks that organic foods have to look beat up and deformed because the use of chemicals is what makes them look perfect and flawless. This is not true. Chemical-free foods can look perfect if grown in your backyard. If you go to jungles or forests untouched by man, you will see fruit and vegetables that look like they sprouted from trees from Heaven. So be cautious the next time you buy anything labeled as 'organic'. Unless you personally know the farmer or the company selling the products, don't trust what you read. You, me, and everything on land and sea are organic.


Suzy Kassem,
Truth Is Crying”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“In this image (watching sensual murder through a peephole) Lorrain embodies the criminal delight of decadent art. The watcher who records the crimes (both the artist and consumer of art) is constructed as marginal, powerless to act, and so exculpated from action, passive subject of a complex pleasure, condemning and yet enjoying suffering imposed on others, and condemning himself for his own enjoyment. In this masochistic celebration of disempowerment, the sharpest pleasure recorded is that of the death of some important part of humanity. The dignity of human life is the ultimate victim of Lorrain's art, thrown away on a welter of delighted self-disgust.”
Jennifer Birkett

David Cronenberg
“We can’t worry about meaning. Ari proposed to us that meaning is a consumer item. Some people manufacture it through religion, philosophy, nationhood, politics, and some people buy it. But an artist is not a manufacturer.”
David Cronenberg, Consumed

“Here, in Lorrain's poisoned little jewel of a tale (“The Man Who Made Wax Heads”) the consummate achievement of decadent art is caught in miniature. The genius of the artist entangles perpetrators and victims in a sticky web of perverse delights, in which exploitation becomes collusion, the ripples of guilt spread outward, and the real criminal slips away. In the end, responsibility is lodged firmly with the consumer, forced – he must confess – by his own perverse desires, to buy into the values of this particularly black market.”
Jennifer Birkett

Steve Maraboli
“As a business leader you have to ask yourself, “Am I creating a consumer environment that is conducive to loyalty?” If the answer is no, FIX IT!”
Steve Maraboli

“...the higher the expectations about unselected alternatives, the lower the level of satisfaction with the chosen good.”
Michael R. Solomon, Consumer Behaviour: A European Perspective

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“The world economy would collapse if a significant number of people were to realize and then act on the realization that it is possible to enjoy many if not most of the things that they enjoy without first having to own them.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Use and Misuse of Children

Seth Godin
“Difference between TV and the internet was how far you sat from the screen. TV was an 8 foot activity, and you were a consumer. The internet was a 16 inch activity, and you participated. I think the sitting down thing is similar. You're not going to buy an armoir while standing on the subway.”
Seth Godin

Derrick Jensen
“Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organised political resistance”
Derrick Jensen

Lorenzo Frick
“Und ist es nicht ein wenig heuchlerisch jemanden „Ruhe in Frieden“ zu wünschen und dann die Bestattung in Überfluss und Opulenz zu veranstalten?”
Lorenzo Frick, Die vollkommene Gesellschaft: Fragen und Antworten einer kritischen Auseinandersetzung

Mohith Agadi
“People don't want anything for FREE unless the price is not reasonable.”
Mohith Agadi

Reid Hoffman
“With the consumer Internet, if you're not embarrassed by your first product release, you've launched too late. Everyone wants their product to be shiny, great, and revolutionary, so they take too long in the development cycle to build this really shiny thing, when in fact time really matters.”
Reid Hoffman

Vironika Tugaleva
“Worth is not something you can buy for $39.99, nor something you can lose with 10 extra pounds. Self-judging people make good consumers. Start a revolution. Love yourself.”
Vironika Tugaleva

Lorenzo Frick
“Dieser Zwang zu Überfluss ist weder effizient für die Umwelt, noch für den Geldbeutel.”
Lorenzo Frick, Die vollkommene Gesellschaft: Fragen und Antworten einer kritischen Auseinandersetzung

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“For their never-ending endeavours to obtain or retain wealth, countries desperately need companies, because they—unlike most human beings—have the means of production, and human beings, because they—unlike all companies—have the means of reproduction.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Use and Misuse of Children

Michel de Montaigne
“De waarde van dingen ligt voor ons niet zozeer in wat ze ons geven als wel in wat wij eraan uitgeven.”
Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

“...mass market consumption offers the facade of social equality without forcing society to go through the hard work of redistributing wealth. Low prices lead consumers to think they can get what they want without necessarily giving them what they want - or need. The ancient Roman phrase for this is panem et circenses, bread and circuses, the art of plying citizens with pleasures to distract them from pain.”
Ellen Ruppel Shell, Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture

Michele Jennae
“If beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, value is in the mind of the consumer.”
Michele Jennae

Peter Hanami
“Japanese students come from an advanced, sophisticated society, have a unique cultural identity and require a range of products and services to meet their education needs.”
Peter Hanami, Buyer Behaviour of Japanese Students in Australia

Peter Hanami
“Japanese students judge a school by its appearance, what it looks like inside and out. They want up to date computers that can read, write and accept Japanese characters. They want the same level of technology they use and have in Japan.”
Peter Hanami, Buyer Behaviour of Japanese Students in Australia

Peter Hanami
“Japanese students when compared to other countries students clearly stand out as highly desirable long-term students. Their high level of literacy, visa access, motivation to study, scholastic ability, and value as alumni make them a sort after student market in Asia”
Peter Hanami, Buyer Behaviour of Japanese Students in Australia

Peter Hanami
“Japanese people like New Zealand, the quality of education, the beautiful natural surroundings, the value for money and the perceived high safety aspect. These unique characteristics attract tourists, working holidaymakers and students alike.”
Peter Hanami, Buyer Behaviour of Japanese Students in New Zealand

Peter Hanami
“Japanese consumers require and expect a lot of detailed information when making a purchase decision.”
Peter Hanami, Buyer Behaviour of Japanese Students in New Zealand

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