Champagne Quotes

Quotes tagged as "champagne" Showing 1-30 of 52
Dorothy Parker
Inventory:

"Four be the things I am wiser to know:
Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe.
Four be the things I'd been better without:
Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt.
Three be the things I shall never attain:
Envy, content, and sufficient champagne.
Three be the things I shall have till I die:
Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.”
Dorothy Parker, The Complete Poems of Dorothy Parker

Bette Davis
“There comes a time in every woman's life when the only thing that helps is a glass of champagne.”
Bette Davis

Leigh Bardugo
“Too much champagne?”
“Maybe.”
“Silly girl,” she said, looping her arm through mine. “There’s no such thing as too much champagne. Though your head will try to tell you otherwise tomorrow.”
Leigh Bardugo, Shadow and Bone

“Here's champagne for our real friends, and real pain for our sham friends.”
Mardy Grothe

Christopher Hitchens
“The four most over-rated things in life are champagne, lobster, anal sex, and picnics.”
Christopher Hitchens

Roman Payne
“Champagne arrived in flûtes on trays, and we emptied them with gladness in our hearts... for when feasts are laid and classical music is played, where champagne is drunk once the sun has sunk and the season of summer is alive in spicy bloom, and beautiful women fill the room, and are generous with laughter and smiles... these things fill men's hearts with joy and remind one that life’s bounty is not always fleeting but can be captured, and enjoyed. It is in writing about this scene that I relive this night in my soul.”
Roman Payne

C.J. Carlyon
“Love me like Saturday night, like three glasses of champagne, like the room is spinning, like you're drunk on my love.”
C.J. Carlyon

David Levithan
“The thing about champagne,you say, unfoiling the cork, unwinding the wire restraint, is that is the ultimate associative object. Every time you open a bottle of champagne, it's a celebration, so there's no better way of starting a celebration than opening a bottle of champagne. Every time you sip it, you're sipping from all those other celebrations. The joy accumulates over time.”
David Levithan, The Lover's Dictionary

Ellen Dean
“Think champagne, drink champagne!”
Ellen Dean

Fredrik Backman
“Very few people have that effect. Very few people are tequila and champagne at the same time.”
Fredrik Backman, Beartown

Coco Chanel
“I only drink Champagne on two occasions, when I am in love and when I am not.”
Coco Chanel

“Breakfast alone by gaslight is about as ghastly as champagne in daylight.”
Jessie Douglas Kerruish, The Undying Monster: A Tale of the Fifth Dimension

Amit Kalantri
“Mixing old wine with new wine is stupidity, but mixing old wisdom with new wisdom is maturity.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Napoléon Bonaparte
“Always carry champagne! In victory You deserve it & in defeat You need it!”
Napoléon Bonaparte

Winston S. Churchill
“I could not live without Champagne. In victory I deserve it. In defeat I need it.”
Winston S. Churchill

Israelmore Ayivor
“You may receive a pie, eat it and forget. You may receive champagne, drink it and forget. But when you receive a book, you can open it again and again.”
Israelmore Ayivor, 101 Keys To Everyday Passion

Louisa May Alcott
“No, I drank champagne and romped and tried to flirt, and was altogether abominable," said Meg reproachfully.”
Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

“Come quickly, I am drinking the stars!”
Dom Perignon

Gerald Durrell
“The noise of drinking was exhilarating. Champagne corks popped and the pale, chrysanthemum-coloured liquid, whispering gleefully with bubbles, hissed into the glasses; heavy red wine glupped into the goblets, thick and crimson as the blood of some mythical monster, and a swirling wreath of pink bubbles formed on the surface; the frosty white wine tiptoed into the glasses, shrilling, gleaming, now like diamonds, now like topaz; the ouzo lay transparent and innocent as the edge of a mountain pool until the water splashed in and the whole glass curdled like a conjuring trick, coiling and blurring into a summer cloud of moonstone white.”
Gerald Durrell, The Garden of the Gods

Anthony Powell
“Champagne, m'lord?'
'Have we got any? One bottle would do. Even a half-bottle.'
Smith's face puckered, as if manfully attempting to force his mind to grapple with a mathematical or philosophical problem of extraordinary complexity. His bearing suggested that he had certainly before heard the word 'champagne' used, if only in some distant, outlandish context; that devotion to his master alone gave him some apprehension of what this question—these ravings, almost—might mean. Nothing good could come of it. This was a disastrous way to talk. That was his unspoken message so far as champagne was concerned. After a long pause, he at last shook his head.
'I doubt if there is any champagne left, m'lord.”
Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time: 2nd Movement

Sue Watson
“That evening I glanced back at the TV as Bella poured half a bottle of the finest brandy into her bowl of cake batter, I waited for tinselly anticipation to land like snowflakes all around me, but I felt nothing. Even when she produced what she described as 'a winter landscape for European cheeses', sprigged with holly and a frosty snow scene, I failed to get my fix.
'Ooh, this is a juicy one,' she said, biting seductively at a maraschino cherry she'd earlier described as 'divinely kitsch'. She swallowed the cherry whole, giggled girlishly and raised a flute of champagne. 'Why have cava when Champagne is sooo much more bubbly? Cheers!' she said, taking a large sip of vintage Krug.”
Sue Watson, Bella's Christmas Bake Off

Wilhelm Busch
“Wie lieb und luftig perlt die Blase
Der Witwe Klicko in dem Glase.”
Wilhelm Busch, Die fromme Helene

Lauren Groff
“watching the tiny bubbles flea-jump out the top of her glass”
Lauren Groff, Fates and Furies

Susan Wiggs
“Servers moved among the guests with trays of hors d'oeuvres and the signature cocktail, champagne with a honey infused liqueur and a delicate spiral twist of lemon.
The banquet was bursting with color and flavor- flower-sprinkled salads, savory chili roasted salmon, honey glazed ribs, just-harvested sweet corn, lush tomatoes and berries, artisan cheeses. Everything had been harvested within a fifty-mile radius of Bella Vista.
The cake was exactly what Tess had requested, a gorgeous tower of sweetness. Tess offered a gracious speech as she and Dominic cut the first slices. "I've come a long way from the city girl who subsisted on Red Bull and microwave burritos," she said. "There's quite a list of people to thank for that- my wonderful mother, my grandfather and my beautiful sister who created this place of celebration. Most of all, I'm grateful to Dominic." She turned to him, offering the first piece on a yellow china plate. "You're my heart, and there is no sweeter feeling than the love we share. Not even this cake. Wait, that might be overstating it. Everyone, be sure you taste this cake. It's one of Isabel's best recipes.”
Susan Wiggs, The Beekeeper's Ball

Susan Rebecca White
“I have a wedge of Brie and some crackers in the pantry, and I could slice a pear or an apple and drizzle the fruit with some orange blossom honey. That always makes a nice accompaniment for cheese. I've got some olives, too, Lucques. I wonder if I have time to make cheese sticks. I use store-bought puff pastry, roll it out, sprinkle it with salt and red pepper flakes and grated Parmesan, then cut the dough into strips, twist them, and bake. They are particularly delicious with a glass of Champagne, especially when you serve the cheese sticks warm.”
Susan Rebecca White, A Place at the Table

Sahndra Fon Dufe
“If I ever ran for President,
It would be a school for scandal.
Champagne for all served before exams.”
Sahndra Fon Dufe

Vincent Okay Nwachukwu
“Pop champagne is a good campaign.”
Vincent Okay Nwachukwu, Weighty 'n' Worthy African Proverbs - Volume 1

Elizabeth Bard
“He carefully poured the juice into a bowl and rinsed the scallops to remove any sand caught between the tender white meat and the firmer coral-colored roe, wrapped around it like a socialite's fur stole.
Mayur is the kind of cook (my kind), who thinks the chef should always have a drink in hand. He was making the scallops with champagne custard, so naturally the rest of the bottle would have to disappear before dinner. He poured a cup of champagne into a small pot and set it to reduce on the stove. Then he put a sugar cube in the bottom of a wide champagne coupe (Lalique, service for sixteen, direct from the attic on my mother's last visit). After a bit of a search, he found the crème de violette in one of his shopping bags and poured in just a dash. He topped it up with champagne and gave it a swift stir.
"To dinner in Paris," he said, glass aloft.
'To the chef," I answered, dodging swiftly out of the way as he poured the reduced champagne over some egg yolks and began whisking like his life depended on it.
"Do you have fish stock?"
"Nope."
"Chicken?"
"Just cubes. Are you sure that will work?"
"Sure. This is the Mr. Potato Head School of Cooking," he said. "Interchangeable parts. If you don't have something, think of what that ingredient does, and attach another one."
I counted, in addition to the champagne, three other bottles of alcohol open in the kitchen. The boar, rubbed lovingly with a paste of cider vinegar, garlic, thyme, and rosemary, was marinating in olive oil and red wine. It was then to be seared, deglazed with hard cider, roasted with whole apples, and finished with Calvados and a bit of cream. Mayur had his nose in a small glass of the apple liqueur, inhaling like a fugitive breathing the air of the open road.
As soon as we were all assembled at the table, Mayur put the raw scallops back in their shells, spooned over some custard, and put them ever so briefly under the broiler- no more than a minute or two. The custard formed a very thin skin with one or two peaks of caramel. It was, quite simply, heaven.
The pork was presented neatly sliced, restaurant style, surrounded with the whole apples, baked to juicy, sagging perfection.”
Elizabeth Bard, Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes

“How fast champagne could go from golden and effervescent to acrid and sad, flat in the glass, moss on the teeth.”
Elizabeth Ames, The Other's Gold

Alain Bremond-Torrent
“..., no champagne no gain,”
Alain Bremond-Torrent, "Darling, it's not only about sex"

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