Arthur Quotes

Quotes tagged as "arthur" Showing 1-30 of 67
Becky Albertalli
“I don’t know if we’re in a love story or a story about love.”
Becky Albertalli, What If It's Us

Becky Albertalli
“God, Arthur.” He kisses me. “Te quiero. Estoy enamorado. You don’t even know.” And I don’t speak a word of Spanish, but when I look at his face, I get it.”
Becky Albertalli, What If It's Us

Mary  Stewart
“The essence of wisdom is to know when to be doing, and when it's useless even to try”
Mary Stewart, The Last Enchantment

Stephen R. Lawhead
“I have seen a land shining with goodness, where each man protects his brother's dignity as readily as his own, where war and want have ceased and all races live under the same law of love and honour.

I have seen a land bright with truth, where a man's word is his pledge and falsehood is banished, where children sleep safe in their mother's arms and never know fear or pain.

I have seen a land where kings extend their hands in justice rather than reach for the sword; where mercy, kindness, and compassion flow like deep water over the land, and men revere virtue, revere truth, revere beauty, above comfort, pleasure or selfish gain. A land where peace reigns in the hill, and love like a fire from every hearth; where the True God is worshipped and his ways acclaimed by all.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

T.H. White
“They had a year of joy, twelve months of the strange heaven which the salmon know on beds of river shingle, under the gin-clear water. For twenty-four years they were guilty, but this first year was the only one which seemed like happiness. Looking back on it, when they were old, they did not remember that in this year it had ever rained or frozen. The four seasons were coloured like the edge of a rose petal for them.”
T.H. White, The Once and Future King

Stephen R. Lawhead
“The Queen of Air and Darkness tilted back her head and laughed. A more ghastly sound I hope never to hear. ‘Do you think I care about these trifles?’
‘Murder is no trifle, woman,’ Arthur said.
‘No? How many men have you killed, Great King? How many have you slain without cause? How many did you cut down that you might have spared? How many died because you in your battle-rage would not heed their pleas for mercy?’
The High King opened his mouth to speak, but could make no answer.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

Winston S. Churchill
“It is all true, or it ought to be; and more and better besides.”
Winston S. Churchill

Mary  Stewart
“Every man carries the seed of his own death, and you will not be more than a man. You will have everything; you cannot have more…”
Mary Stewart, The Hollow Hills

Alan Sillitoe
“Well, it's a good life and a good world, all said and done, if you don't weaken.”
Alan Sillitoe, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

Becky Albertalli
“He laces our fingers and shrugs. And I’m dead. I am actually dead. There’s no other way to explain it. I’m sitting in fucking Herald Square, holding hands with the cutest boy I’ve ever met, and I’m dead. I’m the deadest zombie ghost vampire who ever died. And now my mouth isn’t working. It's like I'm stunned into silence. That never happens.”
Becky Albertalli, What If It's Us

Keri Arthur
“riley: give me a romantic comedy any day.
rhoan: your jest a girly-girl at heart, arent you?
riley: takes one to know one, bro.”
Keri Arthur

Becky Albertalli
“I believe in love at first sight. Fate, the universe, all of it. But not how you’re thinking. I don’t mean it in the 'our souls were split and you’re my other half forever and ever' sort of way. I just think you’re mean to meet some people. I think the universe nudges them into your path. Even on random Monday afternoons in July. Even at the post office.”
Becky Albertalli, What If It's Us

Arthur Pendragon
Lead, follow, or get out of the way.”
Arthur Pendragon, The Trials of Arthur

T.H. White
“God save King Pendragon,
May his reign long drag on,
God save the King.
Send him most gorious,
Great and uproarious,
Horrible and hoarious,
God save our King.”
T.H. White

Graham Moore
“Murder was so trivial in the stories Harold loved. Dead bodies were plot points, puzzles to be reasoned out. They weren't brothers. Plot points didn't leave behind grieving sisters who couldn't find their shoes.”
Graham Moore, The Sherlockian

Kiersten White
“She did not want to be an invisible queen in the castle. Arthur did not rule that way. And she wanted to be his match. His equal.

His partner.

She could no longer deny it. She wanted to be more than a protector to him.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“What about the queen?" Sir Tristan asked, challenge in his voice as he used her as a reason not to follow Arthur's plan.
"The queen," Guinevere said, pulling up her hood, "is ready to ride at the king's side, wherever that takes her.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“I have to keep you safe," he whispered, Arthur once again.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“That is the part of being king. Of being queen. Making choices that will hurt some but save others. And often not knowing until it is too late who will be hurt and who will be saved. I am sorry you have to share it, but I am glad to have the company.”
Kiersten White, The Camelot Betrayal

T.J. Klune
“I don't know why you can't see it."
"See what?"
"You. Everything you are.”
T.J. Klune, The House in the Cerulean Sea

Kiersten White
“She wanted to give him her name. She wanted to give him everything.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“A man dove in front of her, tackling the wolf and rolling with it. Sir Tristan. The wolf clamped down on his forearm, breaking through the leather. Sir Tristan shouted with as much fury as the wolf's growls. He threw it free. Then he ran to Guinevere, picked her up, and tossed her into Arthur's waiting arms.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“Ready to burst, she spoke first. "You cannot be angry with me for saving him."
Arthur sighed. "I can, and I am. And I am not. I am glad Sir Tristan is alive. He is very precious to me. But I cannot risk you.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“Guinevere. Please. The banished woman will wait. When I get back, we will discuss it and come up with a plan. Together. Promise me you will wait for me."

She wanted to be defiant, but it was not anger or command in his face. It was genuine worry pulling his features tight with strain. She sighed, the fight leaving her. "Oh, very well."

"Thank you," he said. Then, to her surprise, he pulled her close and brushed his warm lips against her cheek. The heat of him lingered as she watched him ride away once more.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Kiersten White
“This time the crashing through the trees was not beast, but beloved. Arthur rushed toward them. He grabbed Guinevere from the horse and crushed her to his chest. "We found your hood, your cloak. There were more tracks, more boar prints. We thought - I thought you were taken. Dead."

Guinevere held on to his just as tightly. Something inside her broke and healed at the same time, as she felt how much she mattered to him by the strength of his embrace. She allowed herself one moment to cherish it.”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

“I bowed my head, not knowing what was coming. The dying words of a King were powerful by every magic known to man. But I knew that since it was Arthur, they would be merciful.
“He blessed you, Gwen, and he expressed the wish that when your time comes, you be buried with him. In the same grave.”
The tears ran freely down my face as I felt the love of that strong heart reach out to me, even from death.”
Nancy McKenzie, Queen of Camelot

“The King paused at the door, suddenly looking almost shy. “I don’t wish to be bold, or to instruct you of matters that are none of my concern,” he began, and I froze, fearful of what was coming. “But I like you in blue,” he finished, and disappeared.”
Nancy McKenzie, Queen of Camelot

“Wait for me." It was the same farewell as always. "Wait for me. I shall come back."
And as ever, I made the same reply.
"What else have I to do but wait for you? I shall be here, when you come again.”
Mary Stewart, The Crystal Cave

Kiersten White
“• “Arthur’s whole demeanor shifted as he gestured with so much animation he nearly spilled his drink. “Did you see him fight? Oh, he is magnificent. I have longed to declare a tournament for him, but the problem with rule of law is that you have to abide by your own silly ideas.” P.73
“There was a dangerous magic in pretending… But when Arthur looked across the room and his entire being lit up with happiness at seeing her, she forgot again. She beamed at him as he rushed to her and gave her an exaggerated, silly bow. In the space of crossing the floor, he had transformed from conquering king commanding men twice his age to … Arthur.” P.83
“Iron bites, but it does not kill. And I am accustomed to pain.” P.319
“You cannot let her rise. You know what it would mean.”
“A return to nature. A return to the wild magic at the heart of this country. Do you know who carved Camelot out of the mountain? It was not men. Men came in and claimed it, because that is what men do.” He held his sword and stared at how it caught the moonlight. “I do not want men to die. But they need to be reminded of their place in this world. Someone has to stop them claiming everything worth having. Stop them claiming everyone worth having.” He held a hand out to Guinevere. “You do not belong in Camelot.” P.320
“Guinevere understood Mordred’s anger. She felt it herself. Everything wondrous was being unmade, and it was terrible beyond comprehension. But wonder, too, was terrible.” P.321
“She looked into Arthur’s warm eyes. The boy king. He carried the weight of a kingdom.
She nodded. “Do it.”
Arthur held her gaze. And then the king disappeared, leaving only her friend. Her Arthur.
He sheathed his sword.” P.325”
Kiersten White, The Guinevere Deception

Edoardo Albert
“From the plotting of strangers and iniquitous
Monks, as the water flows from the fountain,
Sad and heavy will be the day of Cadwallon.

The lines come from the Red Book of Hergest, a collection of Welsh poems written in the late-fourteenth century but containing material that is much older.
This brings us, neatly, to J. R. R. Tolkien. For according to a learned authorial conceit, the source of his tales of Middle-earth was the Red Book of Westmarch. Tolkien was the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University and one of his aims was to create a mythology for England, as the Red Book of Hergest, which contains the Mabinogion and other material, could be said to preserve the mythology of the Britons.

Many if not all the writers and scholars involved in Anglo-Saxon studies first came to the field through reading the professor’s stories – and I am one of them, so it is no accident that this story is called Oswald: Return of the King, in tribute and homage. Tolkien writes of Oswald in his seminal essay Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics and the parallels between him and Aragorn – rightful king in exile returning to claim the throne – are obvious.”
Edoardo Albert, Oswald: Return of the King

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