Arthurian Legend Quotes

Quotes tagged as "arthurian-legend" (showing 1-30 of 53)
Marion Zimmer Bradley
“And so, perhaps, the truth winds somewhere between the road to Glastonbury, Isle of the Priests, and the road to Avalon, lost forever in the mists of the Summer Sea.”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

Michael Palin
“Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.”
Michael Palin

T.H. White
“He felt in his heart cruelty and cowardice, the things which made him brave and kind.”
T.H. White, The Once and Future King

Stephen R. Lawhead
“The Queen of Air and Darkness tilted back her head and laughed. A more ghastly sound I hope never to hear. ‘Do you think I care about these trifles?’
‘Murder is no trifle, woman,’ Arthur said.
‘No? How many men have you killed, Great King? How many have you slain without cause? How many did you cut down that you might have spared? How many died because you in your battle-rage would not heed their pleas for mercy?’
The High King opened his mouth to speak, but could make no answer.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

Mary  Stewart
“I am nothing, yes; I am air and darkness, a word, a promise. I watch in the crystal and I wait in the hollow hills. But out there in the light I have a young king and a bright sword to do my work for me, and build what will stand when my name is only a word for forgotten songs and outworn wisdom, and when your name, Morgause, is only a hissing in the dark.”
Mary Stewart, The Hollow Hills

Marion Zimmer Bradley
“I have neither talent or taste for kingship, cousin. I am a warrior, and to dwell always in one place and live at court would weary me to death!”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

M.K. Hume
“At least Morgan is honest! Artor thought as he forced his tired lips to smile. She refuses to eat at my table because she is my enemy. How many of my guests pretend?”
M.K. Hume, Dragon's Child

Marion Zimmer Bradley
“A priestess of Avalon does not lie. But I am cast out of Avalon, and for this, and unless it is all to be for nothing, I must lie, and lie well and quickly”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

M.K. Hume
“You hate him worse than me, you viper,’ he whispered as the stimulant cleared his brain.
‘Aye, lord, but here’s the oddity of it - I love him too.’ Morgan replied, her eyes void of all emotion.”
M.K. Hume, Dragon's Child

Rosemary Sutcliff
“No, don't draw away from me. Whatever else I am, I am your son - your most wretched son. If you do not hate me, try to love me a little, Father; it is lonely never to have been loved, only devoured.”
Rosemary Sutcliff

Stephen R. Lawhead
“Stop, Morgian. Your wiles cannot avail you now.’ He turned to the High King and said, ‘The hurt this woman has done me, I readily forgive. It is for the harm that she has caused others that she is to be judged.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

Elizabeth E. Wein
“I am like a ruined piece of parchment scrawled over and over again with your name, so many times it has become illegible.”
Elizabeth E. Wein, The Winter Prince

Mary  Stewart
“Only a child expects life to be just; it's a man's part to stand by the consequences of his deeds.”
Mary Stewart, The Hollow Hills

Thea Harrison
“Your music hurts, the way sunshine hurts when you’ve existed for a long time in darkness.”
Thea Harrison, Spellbinder

“Stories require faith, not facts.”
T.A. Barron

“A great ruler, a great court, a great kingdom, these texts suggest never exist unto themselves, as stable, fully actualized entities, and, therefore, are never experienced in their plenitude in the present. Instead, they are always remembered as something that occured in the past or anticipated as something will reoccur in the future. Insofar as they are experienced in the current time, it is only for a brief and evanescent moment, overshadowed by the knowledge that it will soon vanish.
For a realist, the fact that the excellence of a person, a place, or a time is not appreciated in its own time proves that it was never actually as excellent as it seemed.
For a Romantic, however, there exist a people, places, and times whose excellence can only be appreciated Arthur always has to be - to quote the Alliterative Morte Arthure (ca.1400) - "the once and future king”
Karen Sullivan, The Danger of Romance: Truth, Fantasy, and Arthurian Fictions

Suzannah  Rowntree
“Gawain laid his hand on his son’s shoulder. “Sir Perceval, when the priest reads the lesson, he says that he who would save his life must lose it. Good words for any man, for there are moments when cowardice will bring death more surely than boldness. But the ordinary man knows, when he goes out to meet the wolf in his road, that he may yet come home in peace. Not so the knights of the Round Table. We win through one deadly peril only to face another. If we banish one evil, we must go on to the next and after that, to the next—until death meets us in the path. We yield up our bodies every day, not for glory and fortune but so that those weaker than ourselves may live. Do you understand?”
“I do,” said Sir Perceval. “And I say that there is no nobler calling. I am content.” But then he thought of the Lady Blanchefleur kissing his brow on a night of fire and blood, and with a sudden ache of grief told himself that even a hundred years of peace would not be enough time to spend with her.”
Suzannah Rowntree, Pendragon's Heir

Mary  Stewart
“It is one thing to have the gift of seeing the spirits and hearing the Gods who move about us as we come and go; but it is a gift of darkness as well as light.”
Mary Stewart

“How are we to account for the vast interest to be found in Arthurian literature today, an interest embracing both the academic and the common person?
The answer may lie in the possibility that there is more of interest to the human being than his own circumscribed range of personal experience and the limited collective experience of the society in which he finds himself. Man has a sense of wonder and he seeks to look beyond the confines of the everyday. Marvel-filled literature enables him to do this and provides him with the stimulus which his imagination craves.”
Ronan Coghlan, The Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Arthurian Legends

“In any Arthurian text, whether a rewriting, a translation or a complication of episodes, engages implicitly as well as explicitly with the surrounding context provided by this corpus, and the reader cannot help but situate their reading in relation to this”
Laura Chuchan Campbell

Anita Clenney
“Are you always this charming?” she asked, slamming the trunk.
“You should see me in bed,”
Anita Clenney, Guardians of Stone

Anita Clenney
“Kendall slapped his butt. “Anyone ever tell you that you have a nice ass?”
“No one that matters.”
Anita Clenney, Fountain Of Secrets

Anita Clenney
“Your search will end in death.”
Anita Clenney, Guardians of Stone

Anita Clenney
“What about me? You read anything on me?”
“You’re angry, a rebel, and you like sex.”
Anita Clenney, Guardians of Stone

Anita Clenney
“Are you coming to bed?”
“With you in your underwear?”
“I can take it off if it bothers you.”
Anita Clenney, Guardians of Stone

Thea Harrison
“Giving her a slow, coaxing smile that turned the heat in the room up by a thousand degrees, he stroked her lips with the balls of his thumbs as he murmured, “Can we get back to talking about possibly inviting that werewolf for sex?”
Thea Harrison, Spellbinder

Ben Zackheim
“I go by Ambrosius, Wild Man of the Woods, and Son of the Devil. Call me what you want, but I am Merlin.”
Ben Zackheim, The Camelot Kids: Volume One

Scott Davis Howard
“Whatever small power of guilt Elaine once held over Lancelot, she’d used up long ago. Oh, self-reproach certainly stung him, but it is one of the most ironic paradoxes of the male temperament that the more shame a man feels, the less likely he is to be persuaded to repent by the person whom he has wronged, especially when she uses guilt as a motive. Like most men, Lancelot lashed out in anger when his shame was too much to bear, thus amplifying his guilt, rather than ameliorating it. It is an all too common downward spiral with men who cherish their honor but act dishonorably.”
Scott Davis Howard, Three Days and Two Knights

Scott Davis Howard
“I suppose he never gets blisters, then,” Scot murmured, then looked up and said, “And in truth, one of the reasons that I’d rather retain my code and my religion is that my gods are flawed and hypocritical. They get blisters—metaphorically. Thor wrangles with rage and Loki with jealousy. The only perfect god, Baldr, was killed for his perfection, which of course proves that pure perfection is an imperfection, or . . .” Scot hesitated, “something like that.” Even he felt that he could have summed that up better.
“There’s pagan wisdom for you,” Gawain scoffed in derision. “Perfection is imperfect and imperfection is preferable. It’s circular logic.”
Scot rolled his eyes, rubbing his ankle. “Paganism (as you condescendingly call my faith) is circular. Your Christianity tries to make everything into a straight line… in order for your world to make sense, everything must have a start and an end. In any case, your king is cut from the same cloth as your Christ—both are like Baldr, too good to last for long—either you are blind or he is a liar. Real people and gods struggle to be their best and fail.”
Scott Davis Howard, Three Days and Two Knights

Scott Davis Howard
“I don’t know,” Scot offered. “Being a hero feels fair and fine to me.”
Mordred turned to him and looked him up and down under his dark brows. “That’s because you’re young, inexperienced, and living in the sunrise glow of a moment of glory. Enjoy it, fellow, while it lasts. You’ve accomplished something that you’ve longed to achieve and felt was an impossible dream since childhood. You’ll have the best half-year of your life (if you’re lucky) and then the glory of this moment will set beyond your horizon. You’ll be left empty, questioning everything, and wishing for a challenge to equal the old. It is the central cycle of every ambitious man’s life—it is the reason he seeks and achieves glory, and the reason that one day his own glory grows too heavy and crushes him, especially as he gets too old to bear its weight.”
Scott Davis Howard, Three Days and Two Knights

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