Schopenhauer Quotes

Quotes tagged as "schopenhauer" Showing 1-30 of 81
Arthur Schopenhauer
“They tell us that Suicide is the greatest piece of Cowardice... That Suicide is wrong; when it is quite obvious that there is nothing in this world to which every man has a more unassailable title than to his own life and person.”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Will Durant
“How much more suffering is caused by the thought of death than by death itself.”
Will Durant, The Story of Philosophy: The Lives and Opinions of the World's Greatest Philosophers

Arthur Schopenhauer
“It often happens that we blurt out things that may in some kind of way be harmful to us, but we are silent about things that may make us look ridiculous; because in this case effect follows very quickly on cause.”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Reading is thinking with someone else's head instead of ones own.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Literature

Arthur Schopenhauer
“There is not much to be got anywhere in the world. It is filled with misery and pain; if a man escapes these, boredeom lies in wait for him at every corner. Nay more; it is evil which generally has the upper hand, and folly that makes the most noise. Fate is cruel and mankind pitiable.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Wisdom of Life

Arthur Schopenhauer
“A poet or philosopher should have no fault to find with his age if it only permits him to do his work undisturbed in his own corner; nor with his fate if the corner granted him allows of his following his vocation without having to think about other people.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Literature

Arthur Schopenhauer
“A man is never happy, but spends his whole life in striving after something that he thinks will make him so; he seldom attains his goal, and when he does, it is only to be disappointed; he is mostly shipwrecked in the end, and comes into harbour with mast and rigging gone. And then, it is all one whether he is happy or miserable; for his life was never anything more than a present moment always vanishing; and now it is over.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, Studies in Pessimism: The Essays

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Truth is most beautiful undraped.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Literature

Tiffany Madison
“[On Schopenhauer in Black and White] Schopenhauer's views of love are flawed. Love can't be merely an illusion of the mind to aid in procreation, but the path to redemption for an otherwise violently selfish species. Past human greatness has proven that when challenged, love can overpower impulsive instinct, and in essence, the vilest aspects of our nature.”
Tiffany Madison

Albert Einstein
“there is found a third level of religious experience, even if it is seldom found in a pure form. I will call it the cosmic religious sense. This is hard to make clear to those who do not experience it, since it does not involve an anthropomorphic idea of God; the individual feels the vanity of human desires and aims, and the nobility and marvelous order which are revealed in nature and in the world of thought. He feels the individual destiny as an imprisonment and seeks to experience the totality of existence as a unity full of significance. Indications of this cosmic religious sense can be found even on earlier levels of development—for example, in the Psalms of David and in the Prophets. The cosmic element is much stronger in Buddhism, as, in particular, Schopenhauer's magnificent essays have shown us. The religious geniuses of all times have been distinguished by this cosmic religious sense, which recognizes neither dogmas nor God made in man's image. Consequently there cannot be a church whose chief doctrines are based on the cosmic religious experience. It comes about, therefore, that we find precisely among the heretics of all ages men who were inspired by this highest religious experience; often they appeared to their contemporaries as atheists, but sometimes also as saints.”
Albert Einstein, Religion and Science

Friedrich Nietzsche
“You say you're a pessimist, but I happen to know that you're in the habit of practicing your flute for two hours every evening.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

“That streetside tree is obscuring the air. Cut it down. Haul it in for questioning. There are secrets within that foliage. You might want to separate the branches in different rooms and apply some elementary game theory.”
“Question a plant?”
“Trees have a will too, just like people. We have to know it’s purpose. Read Schopenhauer.”
“Schopenwho?”
“He was the only authentic German. You might like him. Being a police officer, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the need to put an end to the lives of the perverse when sex crimes go too far. Now just generalize that necessity to every human being.”
Benson Bruno, A Story That Talks about Talking Is Like Chatter to Chattering Teeth, and Every Set of Dentures Can Attest to the Fact That No..

Plautus
“Homo homini lupis est.”
Plautus

Arthur Schopenhauer
“NOT to my contemporaries, not to my compatriots but to
mankind I commit my now completed work in the confidence that it will not be without value for them, even
if this should be late recognised, as is commonly the lot
of what is good. For it cannot have been for the passing
generation, engrossed with the delusion of the moment,
that my mind, almost against my will, has uninterruptedly
stuck to its work through the course of a long life.

preface to the second edition of "the world as will and representation”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Arthur Schopenhauer
“A book can never be anything more than the impress of its author's thoughts; and the value of these will lie either in the matter about which he has thought, or in the form which his thoughts take, in other words, what it is that he has thought about it.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Literature

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Let us see rather that like Janus—or better, like Yama, the Brahmin god of death—religion has two faces, one very friendly, one very gloomy...”
Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays and Aphorisms

“The will has no overall purpose, aims at no highest good, and can never be satisfied. Although it is our essence, it strikes us as an alien agency within, striving for life and procreation blindly, mediated only secondarily by consciousness. Instinctive sexuality is at our core, interfering constantly with the life of the intellect. To be an individual expression of this will is to lead a life of continual desire, deficiency, and suffering. Pleasure or satisfaction exists only relative to a felt lack; it is negative, merely the cessation of an episode of striving or suffering, and has no value of itself. Nothing we can achieve by conscious act of will alters the will to life within us. There is no free will. Human actions, as part of the natural order, are determined [....] As individual parts of the empirical world we are ineluctably pushed through life by a force inside us which is not of our choosing, which gives rise to needs and desires we can never fully satisfy, and is without ultimate purpose. Schopenhauer concludes that it would have been better not to exist—and that the world itself is something whose existence we should deplore rather than celebrate.”
Christopher Janaway

Irvin D. Yalom
“The freedom of an unscheduled afternoon brought confusion rather than joy. Julius had always been focused. When he was not seeing patients, other important projects and activities-writing, teaching, tennis, research-clamored for his attention. But today nothing seemed important. He suspected that nothing had ever been important, that his mind had arbitrarily imbued projects with importance and then cunningly covered its traces. Today he saw through the ruse of a lifetime. Today there was nothing important to do, and he ambled aimlessly down Union Street.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure

Michel Houellebecq
“Nul ne peut voir par-dessus soi, écrit Schopenhauer pour faire comprendre l'impossibilité d'un échange d'idées entre deux individus d'un niveau intellectuel trop différent.”
Michel Houellebecq, The Possibility of an Island

Arthur Schopenhauer
“[I]n other words, we should live with due knowledge of the course of things in the world. For whenever a man in any way loses self-control, or is struck down by a misfortune, grows angry, or loses heart, he shows in this way that he finds things different from what he expected, and consequently that he laboured under a mistake, did not know the world and life, did not know how at every step the will of the individual is crossed and thwarted by the chance of inanimate nature, by contrary aims and intentions, even by the malice inspired in others. Therefore either he has not used his reason to arrive at a general knowledge of this characteristic of life, or he lacks the power of judgement, when he does not again recognize in the particular what he knows in general, and when he is therefore surprised by it and loses his self-control. Thus every keen pleasure is an error, an illusion, since no attained wish can permanently satisfy, and also because every possession and every happiness is only lent by chance for an indefinite time, and can therefore be demanded back in the next hour. Thus both originate from defective knowledge. Therefore the wise man always holds himself aloof from jubilation and sorrow, and no event disturbs his ἀταραξία [ataraxia]."

—from_The World as Will and Representation_. Translated from the German by E. F. J. Paye in two volumes: volume I, p. 88”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Abhaidev
“For Marx, the only thing that motivates humans is money. For Freud, it’s libido. And for Schopenhauer, it is the blind metaphysical will. All are horribly wrong. More than anything, man seeks meaning in his life. And in that meaning, he seeks superiority over others.”
Abhaidev, The Influencer: Speed Must Have a Limit

Peter Wessel Zapffe
“A man will come forth, who before all other men has dared to strip his soul naked and give himself wholly over to our most profound questioning, even to the idea of annihilation. A man who has grasped life in its cosmic context, and whose agony is the agony of the world. But such a rising wail will assail him from all the people of the earth, crying for his thousandfold execution, when his voice blankets the world like a shroud, and his peculiar message is heard for the first and last time:
The life on many worlds is like a rushing river, but the life on this world is like a stagnant puddle and a backwater.The mark of annihilation is written on thy brow. How long will ye mill about on the edge? But there is one victory and one crown, and one salvation and one answer: Know thyselves; be unfruitful and let there be peace on Earth after thy passing.
Peter Wessel Zapffe, The Last Messiah

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Hay pocas cosas que pongan con tanta seguridad de buen humor como el relato de alguna calamidad que se ha sufrido últimamente, o también la sincera confesión de una debilidad personal".”
Schopenhauer

Will Durant
“We are like a man who goes round a castle seeking in vain for an entrance, and sometimes sketching the facades. If we can ferret out the ultimate nature of our own minds we shall perhaps have the key to the external world. ”
Will Durant, The Story of Philosophy: The Lives and Opinions of the World's Greatest Philosophers

“Schopenhauer dreamed a different dream: perhaps reason might detach itself, if only for a few moments, from will, so that the will might relax into playing and reason into pure seeing. He dreamed this dream in philosophy, in art, and above all in music. Never before and never since has such moving philosophy been made about music as by Schopenhauer" - Safranski”
Safranski

Adolf Hitler
“In the Great Hall of the Linz Library are the busts of Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, the greatest of our thinkers, in comparison with whom the British, the French and the Americans have nothing to offer...It is on the foundation of Kant's theory of knowledge that Schopenhauer…conquered the pragmatism of GWF Hegel. I carried Schopenhauer's works with me throughout the whole of the First World War. Schopenhauer...has been far surpassed by Nietzsche.”
Hitler

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Că însă un patron absolut ticălos precum Hegel, a cărui întreagă pseudofilozofare a fost de fapt o amplificare monstruoasă a argumentului ontologic, a căutat să-I apere pe acesta împotriva criticii lui Kant constituie o alianţă de care însuşi argumentului ontologic i s-ar face ruşine, oricât de puţin are el de-a face cu ruşinea.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason

“Whatever one may say, the happiest moment of the happy man is the moment of his falling asleep, and the unhappiest moment of the unhappy man is that of his awaking.”
Schopenhauer Arthur

Arthur Schopenhauer
“Whatever one may say, the happiest moment of the happy man is the moment ... falling asleep, and the unhappiest moment of the unhappy that of his awaking”
Arthur Schopenhauer, On the Vanity of Existence

“No hay nada más implacable y cruel que la envidia: y sin embargo, ¡nos esforzamos incesante y principalmente en suscitar envidia!”
Arthur Shopenhauer

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