Aragorn Quotes

Quotes tagged as "aragorn" Showing 1-30 of 41
J.R.R. Tolkien
“If by my life or death I can protect you, I will. ”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“What does your heart tell you? ”
J.R.R. Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien 4-Book Boxed Set: The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings

J.R.R. Tolkien
“But I am the real Strider, fortunately. I am Aragorn son of Arathorn; and if by life or death I can save you, I will.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“But who knows what she spoke to the darkness, alone, in the bitter watches of the night, when all her life seemed shrinking, and the walls of her bower closing in about her, a hutch to trammel some wild thing in?”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“A time may come soon," said he, "when none will return. Then there will be need of valour without renown, for none shall remember the deeds that are done in the last defence of your homes. Yet the deeds will not be less valiant because they are unpraised."
She answered: "All your words are but to say: you are a woman, and your part is in the house. But when the men have died in battle and honour, you have leave to be burned in the house, for the men will need it no more. But I am of the House of Eorl and not a serving-woman. I can ride and wield blade, and I do not fear either pain or death."
"What do you fear, lady?" he asked.
"A cage," she said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Thus Aragorn for the first time in the full light of day beheld Éowyn, Lady of Rohan, and thought her fair, fair and cold, like a morning of pale spring that is not yet come to womanhood. And she was now suddenly aware of him: tall heir of kings, wise with many winters, greycloaked, hiding a power that yet she felt. For a moment still as stone she stood, then turning swiftly she was gone.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“For she is a fair maiden, fairest lady of a house of queens. And yet I know not how I should speak of her. When I first looked on her and perceived her unhappiness, it seemed to me that I saw a white flower standing straight and proud, shapely as a lily, and yet knew that it was hard, as if wrought by elf-wrights out of steel. Or was it, maybe, a frost that had turned its sap to ice, and so it stood, bitter-sweet, still fair to see, but stricken, soon to fall and die?
- Aragorn about Éowyn”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Not idly do the leaves of Lorien fall”
J R R Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“It was an evil doom that set her in his path. For she is a fair maiden, fairest lady of a house of queens. And yet I know not how I should speak of her. When I first looked on her and perceived her unhappiness, it seemed to me that I saw a white flower standing straight and proud, shapely as a lily and yet knew that it was hard, as if wrought by elf-wrights out of steel.
(Aragorn talking of Eowyn, in the Houses of Healing)”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Suddenly Faramir stirred, and he opened his eyes, and he looked on Aragorn who bent over him; and a light of knowledge and love was kindled in his eyes, and he spoke softly. 'My lord, you called me. I come. What does the king command?”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then Frodo came forward and took the crown from Faramir and bore it to Gandalf; and Aragorn knelt, and Gandalf set the White Crown upon his head and said:
Now come the days of the King, and may they be blessed while the thrones of the Valar endure!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Et Eärello Endorenna utúlien. Sinome maruvan ar Hildinyar tenn’ Ambar-metta!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“The Sword of Elendil was forged anew by Elvish smiths, and on its blade was traced a device of seven stars set between the crescent Moon and rayed Sun, and about them was written many runes; for Aragorn son of Arathorn was going to war upon the marches of Mordor. Very bright was that sword when it was made whole again; the light of the sun shone redly in it, and the light of the moon shone cold, its edge was hard and keen. And Aragorn gave it a new name and called it Andúril, Flame of the West.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“As she stood before Aragorn she paused suddenly and looked upon him, and her eyes were shining. And he looked down upon her fair face and smiled; but as he took the cup, his hand met hers, and he knew that she trembled at the touch.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“There is still hope.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Aragorn threw back his cloak. The elven-sheath glittered as he grasped it, and the bright blade of Andúril shone like a sudden flame as he swept it out. 'Elendil!' he cried. 'I am Aragorn, son of Arathorn, and am called Elessar, the Elfstone, Dúnadan, the heir of Isildur Elendil's son of Gondor. Here is the Sword that was Broken and is forged again! Will you aid me or thwart me? Choose swiftly!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then she fell on her knees, saying: 'I beg thee!'
'Nay, lady,' he said, and taking her by the hand he raised her. The he kissed her hand, and sprang into the saddle, and rode away, and did not look back; and only those who knew him well and were near to him saw the pain that he bore.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then Aragorn stooped and looked in her face, and it was indeed white as a lily, cold as frost, and hard as graven stone. But he bent and kissed her on the brow, and called her softly, saying:
'Éowyn Éomund's daughter, awake! For your enemy has passed away!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I would have followed you. My brother. My captain. My king.”
JRR Tolkien, The Lord Of The Rings

J.R.R. Tolkien
“All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost”
Jrr Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings : 6 Volumes Set

Karl Wiggins
“Sir Richard Francis Burton was a cross between Indiana Jones and Captain Jack Sparrow, with perhaps a little piece of the warrior-poet Aragorn from Lord of the Rings thrown in for good measure. Or maybe I should rephrase that; all these swashbuckling film heroes, including probably John Rambo, may well have been loosely based on Burton and his life”
Karl Wiggins, Wrong Planet - Searching for your Tribe

J.R.R. Tolkien
“And then wonder took him, and a great joy; and he cast his sword up in the sunlight and sang as he caught it. And all eyes followed his gaze, and behold! upon the foremost ship a great standard broke, and the wind displayed it as she turned towards the Harlond. There flowered a White Tree, and that was for Gondor; but Seven Stars were about it, and a high crown above it, the signs of Elendil that no lord had borne for years beyond count. And the stars flamed in the sunlight, for they were wrought of gems by Arwen daughter of Elrond; and the crown was bright in the morning, for it was wrought of mithril and gold.

Thus came Aragorn son of Arathorn, Elessar, Isildur's heir, out of the Paths of the Dead, borne upon a wind from the Sea to the kingdom of Gondor; and the mirth of the Rohirrim was a torrent of laughter and a flashing of swords, and the joy and wonder of the City was a music of trumpets and a ringing of bells. But the hosts of Mordor were seized with bewilderment, and a great wizardry it seemed to them that their own ships should be filled with their foes; and a black dread fell on them, knowing that the tides of fate had turned against them and their doom was at hand.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Suddenly Bilbo looked up. ‘Ah, there you are at last, Dunadan!’ he cried... ‘Where have you been, my friend? Why weren’t you at the feast? The Lady Arwen was there.’

Strider looked down at Bilbo gravely. ‘I know,’ he said. ‘But often I must put mirth aside...”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then, whether Aragorn had indeed some forgotten power of Westernesse, or
whether it was but his words of the Lady Éowyn that wrought on them, as the sweet
influence of the herb stole about the chamber it seemed to those who stood by that a
keen wind blew through the window, and it bore no scent, but was an air wholly fresh
and clean and young, as if it had not before been breathed by any living thing and came
new-made from snowy mountains high beneath a dome of stars, or from shores of
silver far away washed by seas of foam. 'Awake, Éowyn, Lady of Rohan!' said Aragorn
again, and he took her right hand in his and felt it warm with life returning.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“But when Aragorn arose all that beheld him gazed in silence, for it seemed to
them that he was revealed to them now for the first time. Tall as the sea-kings of old, he
stood above all that were near; ancient of days he seemed and yet in the flower of
manhood; and wisdom sat upon his brow, and strength and healing were in his hands,
and a light was about him. And then Faramir cried:
'Behold the King!'
And in that moment all the trumpets were blown, and the King Elessar went
forth and came to the barrier, and Húrin of the Keys thrust it back; and amid the music
of harp and of viol and of flute and the singing of clear voices the King passed through
the flower-laden streets, and came to the Citadel, and entered in; and the banner of the Tree and the Stars was unfurled upon the topmost tower, and the reign of King Elessar
began, of which many songs have told.
In his time the City was made more fair than it had ever been, even in the days of
its first glory; and it was filled with trees and with fountains, and its gates were
wrought of mithril and steel, and its streets were paved with white marble; and the Folk
of the Mountain laboured in it, and the Folk of the Wood rejoiced to come there; and all
was healed and made good, and the houses were filled with men and women and the
laughter of children, and no window was blind nor any courtyard empty; and after the
ending of the Third Age of the world into the new age it preserved the memory and the
glory of the years that were gone.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then, whether Aragorn had indeed some forgotten power of Westernesse, or whether it was but his words of the Lady Éowyn that wrought on them, as the sweet influence of the herb stole about the chamber it seemed to those who stood by that a
keen wind blew through the window, and it bore no scent, but was an air wholly fresh and clean and young, as if it had not before been breathed by any living thing and came new-made from snowy mountains high beneath a dome of stars, or from shores of silver far away washed by seas of foam. 'Awake, Éowyn, Lady of Rohan!' said Aragorn
again, and he took her right hand in his and felt it warm with life returning.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“In his time the City was made more fair than it had ever been, even in the days of its first glory;
and it was filled with trees and with fountains,
and its gates were wrought of mithril and steel,
and its streets were paved with white marble;
and the Folk of the Mountain laboured in it,
and the Folk of the Wood rejoiced to come there;
and all was healed and made good, and the houses were filled with men and women and the
laughter of children,
and no window was blind nor any courtyard empty; and after the ending of the Third Age of the world into the new age it preserved the memory and the glory of the years that were gone.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I’ve more need of thoughts than of sleep.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Photo Guide

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Trolls do not build.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

Edoardo Albert
“From the plotting of strangers and iniquitous
Monks, as the water flows from the fountain,
Sad and heavy will be the day of Cadwallon.

The lines come from the Red Book of Hergest, a collection of Welsh poems written in the late-fourteenth century but containing material that is much older.
This brings us, neatly, to J. R. R. Tolkien. For according to a learned authorial conceit, the source of his tales of Middle-earth was the Red Book of Westmarch. Tolkien was the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University and one of his aims was to create a mythology for England, as the Red Book of Hergest, which contains the Mabinogion and other material, could be said to preserve the mythology of the Britons.

Many if not all the writers and scholars involved in Anglo-Saxon studies first came to the field through reading the professor’s stories – and I am one of them, so it is no accident that this story is called Oswald: Return of the King, in tribute and homage. Tolkien writes of Oswald in his seminal essay Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics and the parallels between him and Aragorn – rightful king in exile returning to claim the throne – are obvious.”
Edoardo Albert, Oswald: Return of the King

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