Frodo Baggins Quotes

Quotes tagged as "frodo-baggins" (showing 1-30 of 47)
J.R.R. Tolkien
“It would be the death of you to come with me, Sam," said Frodo, "and I could not have borne that."

"Not as certain as being left behind," said Sam.

"But I am going to Mordor."

"I know that well enough, Mr. Frodo. Of course you are. And I'm coming with you.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Then Frodo came forward and took the crown from Faramir and bore it to Gandalf; and Aragorn knelt, and Gandalf set the White Crown upon his head and said:
Now come the days of the King, and may they be blessed while the thrones of the Valar endure!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Where are you going, Master?' cried Sam, though at last he understood what was happening.

'To the Havens, Sam,' said Frodo.

'And I can't come.'

'No, Sam. Not yet, anyway, not further than the Havens. Though you too were a Ring-bearer, if only for a little while. Your time may come. Do not be too sad, Sam. You cannot always be torn in two. You will have to be one and whole, for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do.'

'But,' said Sam, and tears started in his eyes, 'I thought you were going to enjoy the Shire, too, for years and years, after all you have done.'

'So I thought too, once. But I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them. But you are my heir: all that I had and might have had I leave to you. And also you have Rose, and Elanor; and Frodo-lad will come, and Rosie-lass, and Merry, and Goldilocks, and Pippin; and perhaps more that I cannot see. Your hands and your wits will be needed everywhere. You will be the Mayor, of course, as long as you want to be, and the most famous gardener in history; and you will read things out of the Red Book, and keep alive the memory of the age that is gone, so that people will remember the Great Danger, and so love their beloved land all the more. And that will keep you as busy and as happy as anyone can be, as long as your part in the Story goes on.

'Come now, ride with me!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“And here he was, a little halfling from the Shire, a simple hobbit of the quiet countryside, expected to find a way where the great ones could not go, or dared not go. It was an evil fate.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Muchos de los que viven merecen morir y algunos de los que mueren merecen la vida. ¿Puedes devolver la vida? Entonces no te apresures a dispensar la muerte, pues ni el más sabio conoce el fin de todos los caminos.”
Gandalf

J.R.R. Tolkien
“And there was Frodo, pale and worn, and yet himself again; and in his eyes there was peace now, neither strain of will, nor madness, nor any fear. His burden was taken away.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“There is no real going back. Though I may come to the Shire, it will not seem the same; for I shall not be the same. I am wounded with knife, sting, and tooth, and a long burden. Where shall I find rest?”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Gandalf!' cried Frodo, sitting up. There was the old wizard, sitting in a chair by an open window.

'Yes,' he said, 'I am here. And you are lucky to be here, too, after all the absurd things you have done since you left home."
He was smiling, and there seemed to be little wrong with him. But to the wizard's eye there was a faint change, just a hint as it were of transparency, about him, and especially about the left hand that lay outside upon the coverlet.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I wonder,' said Frodo. 'It's my doom, I think, to go to that Shadow yonder, so that a way will be found. But will good or evil show it to me?”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“All this last day Frodo had not spoken, but had walked half-bowed, often stumbling, as if his eyes no longer saw the way before his feet. Sam guessed that among all their pains he bore the worst, the growing weight of the Ring, a burden on the body and a torment to his mind. Anxiously Sam had noted how his master's left hand would often be raised as if to ward off a blow, or to screen his shrinking eyes from a dreadful Eye that sought to look in them. And sometimes his right hand would creep to his breast, clutching, and then slowly, as the will recovered mastery, it would be withdrawn.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“You are wise and fearless and fair, Lady Galadriel,' said Frodo. 'I will give you the One Ring, if you ask for it. It is too great a matter for me”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Though he walked and breathed, and about him living leaves and flowers were stirred by the same cool wind as fanned his face, Frodo felt he was in a timeless land that did not fade or change or fall into forgetfulness. When he had gone and passed again into the outer world, still Frodo the wanderer from the Shire would walk there, upon the grass among elanor and niphredil in fair Lothlorien”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“We're going on a bit too fast. You and I, Sam, are still stuck in the worst places of the story, and it is all too likely that some will say at this point: "Shut the book now, dad; we don't want to read any more.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“And far away, as Frodo put on the Ring and claimed it for his own, even in Sammath Naur the very heart of his realm, the Power in Barad-dur was shaken, and the Tower trembled from its foundations to its proud and bitter crown. The Dark Lord was suddenly aware of him, and his Eye piercing all shadows looked across the plain to the door that he had made; and the magnitude of his own folly was revealed to him in a blinding flash, and all the devices of his enemies were at last laid bare.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I would rather see him than all the towers and palaces in the world.”
J.R.R. TOLKEIN

J.R.R. Tolkien
“I am commanded to go to the land of Mordor, and therefore I shall go,' said Frodo. 'If there is only one way, then I must take it. What comes after must come.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Glorfindel smiled. 'I doubt very much,' he said, 'if your friends would be in danger if you were not with them! The pursuit would follow you and leave us in peace, I think. It is you, Frodo, and that which you bear that brings us all in peril.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Anne Marie Gazzolo
“The hobbit is hallowed for his terrible and grace-filled journey and hollowed out by it. His body seems too small for all that he endures but not so his heart. Fear, fatigue, cold, hunger, and thirst torment him, but he continues out of love. Frodo’s struggle shows that there are, in fact, two quests going on: his to destroy the Ring and the Ring’s to dominate and destroy him. Despite the despair that it causes, which both fills and empties him, the Ring-bearer remains as intent upon saving everyone as Denethor is not. Frodo’s torn heart still beats, and it pushes past terror and hopelessness because of Sam’s blessed aid and his own battered and bleeding will to do so. Both hobbits teach us the great value of redemptive suffering.”
Anne Marie Gazzolo, Moments of Grace and Spiritual Warfare in The Lord of the Rings

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Well, I suppose we must be going on again,' he said. 'I wonder how long it will be before we really are caught and all the toiling and the slinking will be over, and in vain.' He stood up. 'It's dark, and we cannot use the Lady's glass. Keep it safe for me, Sam. I have nowhere to keep it now, except in my hand, and I shall need both hands in the blind night. But Sting I give to you. I have got an orc-blade, but I do not think it will be my part to strike any blow again.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

J.R.R. Tolkien
“But this is terrible!’ cried Frodo. ‘Far worse than the worst that I imagined from your hints and warnings. O Gandalf, best of friends, what am I to do? For now I am really afraid. What am I to do? What a pity that Bilbo did not stab that vile creature, when he had a chance!’
‘Pity? It was Pity that stayed his hand. Pity, and Mercy: not to strike without need. And he has been well rewarded, Frodo. Be sure that he took so little hurt from the evil, and escaped in the end, because he began his ownership of the Ring so. With Pity.’
‘I am sorry,’ said Frodo. ‘But I am frightened; and I do not feel any pity for Gollum.’
‘You have not seen him,’ Gandalf broke in.
‘No, and I don’t want to,’ said Frodo. I can’t understand you. Do you mean to say that you, and the Elves, have let him live on after all those horrible deeds? Now at any rate he is as bad as an Orc, and just an enemy. He deserves death.’
‘Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Don't you let go!”
J.R.R. Tolkien

“Alright, we put it away. We keep it hidden. We never speak of it again. No one knows it's here, do they? Do they, Gandalf?”
J. R. R. Tolkien

Anne Marie Gazzolo
“Bilbo and Frodo overcome the objections of the Baggins side of themselves in order to embrace the Quests that await them. Sometimes we have the same struggles as they do. The Took in us wants to pursue dreams, and the Baggins part wants to stay safe and conventional. Too often we heed the negative thinking that convinces us that we do not have the time, money, energy, or opportunity to make our desires come true. We think we have too many other obligations blocking our way. Sometimes we also saddle ourselves with the false guilt that tells us it is not right to do anything for ourselves, especially if we have a family to take care of first. We must not abandon our true responsibilities, of course, but would it not be better if we could fulfill them in a way that fed our soul and not just our pocketbook and got us excited about going to work rather than dreading the drudgery?”
Anne Marie Gazzolo, Moments of Grace and Spiritual Warfare in The Lord of the Rings

“Alright, we put it away. We keep it hidden. We never speak of it again. No one knows it's here, do they? Do they, Gandalf?”
Frodo Baggins

J.R.R. Tolkien
“It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: someone has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

Anne Marie Gazzolo
“His ordeal has stripped away every bit of himself and leaves him feeling completely exposed to his Enemy. He has no way to know when the next full-scale attack will come, only that it will and that he cannot hide or protect himself from it.
Yet even in Frodo’s darkness, with the fiery Ring as the only illumination he senses, there is still deep union between him and God. Evil continually forces its way into the hobbit’s soul, but God is already there to strengthen him in his struggle to keep the demonic power from overwhelming him completely. As Frodo burns upon the kindled wheel, he becomes a candle set alight by both Light and Dark, a figure 'clothed in flame' (LOTR, 890), as Sam saw by the red light in the Tower chamber. The combination of this torment, God’s love for him, and his own love for his world consume him in 'a holy sacrifice, truly pleasing to God' (Rom. 12:1).”
Anne Marie Gazzolo, Moments of Grace and Spiritual Warfare in The Lord of the Rings

“Muchos de los que viven merecen morir y algunos de los que mueren merecen la vida. ¿Puedes devolver la vida? Entonces no te apresures a dispensar la muerte, pues ni el más sabio conoce el fin de todos los caminos.”
Gandals

J.R.R. Tolkien
“„Mi-ar plăcea să salvez ținutul ăsta, dacă-mi stă în putință - chiar dacă au fost vremuri când i-am socotit pe locuitorii lui mai nătângi și mai grei de cap decât o pot spune vorbele, și când mă bătea gândul că un cutremur sau o năvală a dragonilor le-ar prinde bine.”
Tolkien J.R.R.

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Gollum merece la muerte. La merece, sin duda. Muchos de los que viven merecen morir y algunos de los que mueren merecen la vida ¿Puedes devolver la vida? Entonces no te apresures a dispensar la muerte, pues ni el más sabio conoce el fin de todos los caminos.”
Gandalf

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