75 Books...More or Less! discussion

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Archive (2015 Completed) > Kay's "Gonna Make It" Challenge - 2015 (Completed!)

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message 1: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments I'm ready!


message 2: by Karin (new)

Karin | 123 comments Good Luck!
Happy New Year!!!


message 3: by Kristin's (new)

Kristin's (Kristinnb) | 186 comments I'm so going to make it in 2015 too! HAH!


message 4: by Elyse, Moderator (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Good luck!


message 5: by Dawn Michelle (new)

Dawn Michelle | 1614 comments YAY Kay!!!
You can do it!!!


message 6: by Hillary (new)

Hillary (Hmom) | 352 comments Happy New Year and Reading toward goal!


message 7: by Charleen (new)

Charleen (charleenlynette) | 994 comments Good luck!


message 8: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Thanks, everyone!

1. Liver Let Die by Liz Lipperman, 3/5 stars


message 9: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, 5/5 stars.

I absolutely loved this book. I'm not sure what age group it's intended for, though. It's about a middle-school kid and it's devoid of foul language and dicey innuendo, etc. so I'm thinking it would be suitable for teens. Yet I found it in the adult section at my library. Any thoughts from others who've read this on the appropriate age group? I was thinking my 14-year old son might like it.


message 10: by Elyse, Moderator (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Karol wrote: "2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, 5/5 stars.

I absolutely loved this book. I'm not sure what age group it's intended for, though. It's about a middle-school kid and it's..."


My 9-year-old niece and 12-year-old nephew have both read it. I think it's intended for middle grade but just good for everyone and everyone should read it!! I liked it.


message 11: by Kristin's (new)

Kristin's (Kristinnb) | 186 comments I'm always looking for good books for my teens!! I will look into this one. :-)


message 12: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Elyse wrote: "My 9-year-old niece and 12-year-old nephew have both read it. I think it's intended for middle grade but just good for everyone and everyone should read it!! I liked it. "

Thanks, Elyse. I thought it was probably targeted for tweens or young teens, so it did surprise me to find it in the adult section at my library.


message 13: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Kristin wrote: "I'm always looking for good books for my teens!! I will look into this one. :-)"

Thanks for your comments, Kristin! (This one, and the one earlier). By the way, I believe you ARE gonna' make it this year.


message 14: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 3. A Winter Dream by Richard Paul Evans, 4/5 stars.

This book is the story of Joseph from the book of Genesis in the Bible, set in a modern advertising agency. Since I know the biblical story very well, there weren't a lot of surprises in the novel. Yet, I found it quite readable - interesting and entertaining. And it is thought-provoking to see how timeless the Bible really is.


message 15: by Karol (last edited Jan 17, 2015 11:46AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 4. Paper Roses by Amanda Cabot, 4/5 stars

Christian historical romance with a mystery thrown in - covered quite a few genres here. It was a pretty good story altogether.


message 16: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 5. Missing by Shelley Shepard Gray, 4/5 stars.

A mystery/romance set in Amish country . . . the disappointment is that the mystery is solved over the course of three books, not just one.

This was my first experience with a Playaway from the library. I liked that technology a lot.


message 17: by Andrea, Moderator (new)

Andrea | 3813 comments Mod
Off to a running jump Kay :)


message 18: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Andrea wrote: "Off to a running jump Kay :)"

you bet! a running start this year for sure!

6. Pecos Bill, The Greatest Cowboy of All Time by James Cloyd Bowman, 4/5 stars

I remember, many a year ago, reading about Pecos Bill riding a cyclone like it was a bronco. The story was featured in a section about Tall Tales in our school reading text book. I loved the story back then, and I enjoyed it again now along with all the other "tall tales" in this book. Perhaps I love these stories given the knack my grandfather had for telling his own stories about his father in the old days (late 1800's) on the plains of Nebraska. Whatever the reason, I've always loved the old Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill stories, and really enjoyed taking a look at Bill all over again.

7. Chop, Chop by L.N. Cronk, 5/5 stars

I related to this story, as it told of the deep friendship among kids in a local youth group. Seeing how their faith and the lessons they learned together shaped how they dealt with the world was so encouraging, and I pondered how some of those early life lessons of my own have shaped my entire life.

There is a lot of sadness in the story, and yet there is triumph over the worst of circumstances too. I'm sorry I waited so long to read this book, and I definitely plan to read more of the books in the series.


message 19: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 8. On the Banks of Plum Creek, by Laura Ingalls Wilder, 5/5 stars

I read this one for a group discussion in Goodread's Children's Books group. Of course, I read all of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books as a child. That was many a year ago. Back then, I read with wonderment and related to Laura's struggles as the little girl who was not quite as well-behaving as her older sister. (I had the same thing going on back then!)

As an adult, I obviously approached the book quite differently. The hardships in this book are incredible - losing crops to hordes of grasshoppers, fighting prairie fire, dealing with blinding blizzards, etc. I was struck by the difficulty of the Ingalls' lives, the tall responsibilities that Mary and Laura had at a very young age, and the strong bond of love in the family that held them all together. Really, a remarkable book.


message 20: by Elyse, Moderator (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Karol wrote: "8. On the Banks of Plum Creek, by Laura Ingalls Wilder, 5/5 stars

I read this one for a group discussion in Goodread's Children's Books group. Of course, I read all of ..."


I enjoyed these books very much as a child!


message 21: by Andrea, Moderator (new)

Andrea | 3813 comments Mod
My sister went nuts over the Little House books but it's funny as much as I love to read I never got into them. I wonder if I would like them more as an adult.


message 22: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 9. The Big Five-OH! by Sandra D. Bricker, 4/5 stars

Parts of this story were VERY funny. It was a great pick-me-up.

10. Dearest Dorothy, Who Would Have Ever Thought?, by Charlene Ann Baumbich, 4/5 stars.

Actually, this book was a good pick-me-up also. Sweet characters and warm family stuff. I wish I had been reading this around Thanksgiving weekend, but the story was a good one to read any time I suppose.


message 23: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 11. Starting Now by Debbie Macomber, 3/5/stars

A pretty good chick book. Seems like it took Libby, the main character, an awfully long time and frustrating time to figure some basic things out. But then, I guess life is that way sometimes.


message 24: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:42AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments I've been in the mood for mysteries all of a sudden. Finished two of them on the same day!

12. The Cat Who Came to Breakfast, by Lilian Jackson Braun, 3/5 stars

I thought I would like this one much more than I did. However, the author's use of cats providing clues through random selection of dominoes, etc. kind of killed it for me. They just "knew" stuff, apparently. My experiences with my cats leads me to believe, however, that they are totally unconcerned with human goings-on. Still, I enjoyed the main character, found some humor in the story, and found an interesting complexity in the mystery.

13. Murder in Miniature, by Margaret Grace, 4/5 stars.

Geraldine Porter, the main character, is just a lot of fun to read about. A nice (but not too old) grandma who has pluck, humor, and steadfast loyalty to family and friends. I'm not all that into miniatures, but as a crafter in other areas it was interesting to read about the work and detail that go into this hobby. The mystery itself was pretty good, although there were a couple of "coincidences" that stretched credibility just a little. But then, that's not all that unusual in the cozy mystery genre. This first book in a series was entertaining enough that I'm keeping this author on my short list for future reading.


message 25: by Kristin's (new)

Kristin's (Kristinnb) | 186 comments I haven't read a mystery in a long time. Maybe I should try one out soon? I usually enjoy them but I'm a big fantasy nerd so those are usually what I look for.


message 26: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Kristin wrote: "I haven't read a mystery in a long time. Maybe I should try one out soon? I usually enjoy them but I'm a big fantasy nerd so those are usually what I look for."

Interesting . . . I'm not a fantasy reader myself. Maybe I should try that genre! I enjoy cozy mysteries for their character development and the sense of justice (because the criminal is always found out).


message 27: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:42AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 14. Valentine Murder, by Leslie Meier, 4/5 stars

This is the second time I've read Leslie Meier. I read the first mystery in this Lucy Stone series Mistletoe Murder, all of which are set around a holiday or major event. In this book, which was written in 1999, I was distracted by Lucy's absolute ignorance of the Internet and how browsing worked. (I guess I was an early adopter for an older person, getting connected in 1995). Things have changed - I don't personally know anyone in my generation or younger any more who is so lacking in knowledge. Even my 86 year old mother has a Facebook page, although my 88 year old aunt doesn't even have a computer and never will.

Anyway, I did enjoy the story overall and I like Lucy, who is the mom of 4 children and in this book, a new library board member.

15. How to Tell If Your Cat Is Plotting to Kill You, by Matthew Inman, 2/5 stars

I really thought I'd like this book more than I did. Most of it was so-so, but there were some things in it that were hilariously funny.


message 28: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:42AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 16. Starry Night, by Debbie Macomber, 3/5 stars.

A nice romance.


message 29: by Meghanly (new)

Meghanly | 253 comments Karol wrote: "2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, 5/5 stars.

I absolutely loved this book. I'm not sure what age group it's intended for, though. It's about a middle-school kid and it's..."


Loved Wonder! We placed it on the summer reading list for our 6th grade students and it has been well-received by parents and students.


message 30: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Meghanly wrote: "Karol wrote: "2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, 5/5 stars.

Loved Wonder! We placed it on the summer reading list for our 6th grade students and it has been well-received by parents and students."


Oh, that's great! "Wonder" has really stuck with me. Great story and one that perhaps helps people see things differently.


message 31: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:42AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 17. Miss Match, by Erynn Mangum, 4/5 stars (02/21/15)

Very funny chick-lit (Christian perspective). I laughed out loud frequently during this book.


18. Thimble Summer, by Elizabeth Enright, 5/5 stars.

Another Newberry winner that I somehow missed during my growing-up years. I have to say I absolutely loved this story that took place in the 1930's. Farm life as it is described in this story sounds so much like the stories from my own family. Great story-telling by the author. Loved the illustrations, too! (In the edition I read, the author's Newberry acceptance speech is included. In it, she points out that she began as an illustrator and eventually began writing her own stories).


message 32: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:42AM) (new)


message 33: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:43AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 20. The Victory Club, by Robin Lee Hatcher, 4/5 stars


message 34: by Elyse, Moderator (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Karol wrote: "18. Devil's Food Cake Murder, by Joanne Fluke, 4/5 stars"

I need to start this series soon!


message 35: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:43AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 21. In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette, by Hampton Sides, 5/5 stars

I think it would be hard for anyone to find this work of historical nonfiction "boring". I read it rather quickly, not wanting to put it down. The author brought people to life in a way that has been rare in history books. I found myself feeling such an ache in my heart over the struggles the men in this polar expedition faced. Very well written and informative. I'll never think of the north pole in quite the same way.

22. A Lack of Temperance by Anna Loan-Wilsey, 4/5 stars.

This mystery takes place in the late 1800s. The main characters are women, and it is interesting to see how they are treated in society - what their assumed "place" is. Quite an interesting book to me, although I didn't find it as suspenseful as some mysteries are.


message 36: by Elyse, Moderator (last edited Mar 06, 2015 05:36AM) (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Karol wrote: "20. In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette, by Hampton Sides, 5/5 stars

I think it would be hard for anyone to find this wor..."


This is in my TBR! I'm currently listening to No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks about Ed Viesturs climbing the world's 14 tallest peaks. He goes over the 1996 Everest catastrophe and other tragedies along with some amazing triumphs. It's fascinating.


message 37: by Dawn Michelle (new)

Dawn Michelle | 1614 comments Kay, did you know that there are Wonder short stories as well? They continue the story of Wonder, from other people's POV. And they are AWESOME!!! :-)

I added In the Kingdom of Ice and Elyse, you DO need to start the Hannah Swenson series. They are fun!! :-)


message 38: by Karol (last edited Mar 07, 2015 01:36AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Dawn Michelle wrote: "Kay, did you know that there are Wonder short stories as well? They continue the story of Wonder, from other people's POV. And they are AWESOME!!! :-)
"


Dawn Michelle, I did NOT know that. I'll have to look into the short stories. Thanks for that tip!


message 39: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Elyse wrote: "I'm currently listening to No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks about Ed Viesturs climbing the world's 14 tallest peaks. He goes over the 1996 Everest catastrophe and other tragedies along with some amazing triumphs. It's fascinating."

Elyse, that does sound like a fascinating read. I'm adding it to my To-Read list.


message 40: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 23. Mr. Popper's Penguins, by Richard Atwater, 4/5 stars.

Loved the fun and fanciful plot! Read for the Newberry Book Club within Goodreads group Children's Books.


message 41: by Karol (last edited Mar 17, 2015 03:02AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 24. Easter Bunny Murder, by Leslie Meier, 4/5 stars


message 42: by Karol (last edited Mar 17, 2015 03:03AM) (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 25. A Fatal Grace, by Louise Penny, 5/5 stars

I really like the artsy Canadian village of Three Pines that Penny has crafted.


message 43: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 26. The Giver, by Lois Lowry, 4/5 stars


message 44: by Elyse, Moderator (new)

Elyse (weezie40er) | 5752 comments Mod
Karol wrote: "26. The Giver, by Lois Lowry, 4/5 stars"

Karol, was this your first time reading The Giver? I read it a few years ago and was blown away. Unfortunately, Lowry took too long to write the following 3 companion novels so they don't feel the same but as a whole, they're a good quartet.


message 45: by Andrea, Moderator (new)

Andrea | 3813 comments Mod
I never read the other 3 books, I should put those on my reading bucket list because I loved the Giver.


message 46: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments Elyse wrote: "Karol wrote: "26. The Giver, by Lois Lowry, 4/5 stars"

Karol, was this your first time reading The Giver? I read it a few years ago and was blown away."


Elyse and Andrea, yep - first time reading The Giver. While I enjoyed it, I'm not finding myself at all motivated to read the others at this time.


message 47: by Karol (last edited Apr 03, 2015 05:47AM) (new)


message 48: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 34. Kansas Troubles, by Earlene Fowler, 4/5 stars (04/04/15)


message 49: by Karol (new)


message 50: by Karol (new)

Karol | 1767 comments 39. Daniel Boone, by James Daugherty, 4/5 stars

A Newberry award winner back in the day . . . although the writing style is old-fashioned (a reflection of when it was written) it really does contain a lot of historical information about the settling of Kentucky.

40. Mrs. Lincoln's Rival, by Jennifer Chiaverini, 4/5 stars

I loved this book, and learned quite a lot about the political maneuverings of Lincoln's cabinet during his presidency. The Civil War years were such a challenging time to live through, no matter which side of the war you were on. Kate Chase Sprague, the daughter of a cabinet member who wished to be president, is an interesting person on her own. Highly political and independent, she was perhaps her father's closest political advisor, at least while she was a single woman. In her day, of course, political careers were not open to women at all (we couldn't even vote!) unless one had access as a family member like she did. A truly fascinating story.


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