Voodoo Quotes

Quotes tagged as "voodoo" Showing 1-30 of 64
Sully Erna
“I'm not the one who's so far away
When I feel the snake bite enter my veins.
Never did I wanna be here again,
And I don't remember why I came.”
Sully Erna

Charles A. Cornell
“No evil ever came from a woman’s womb that wasn’t placed there first by a man.’... Tantie Neptune, Lucifer's Key by Charles A. Cornell, due 2013”
Charles A. Cornell

R.G. Alexander
“Bone Daddy.
That's what they called him. A walking talking well-hung pleasure factory who, with a few easy orgasms, could bring you whatever your heart desired. Your boyfriend would propose, your boss would give you a raise. Rumor had it he could heal your scars, inside and out. If you satisfied his lust.”
R.G. Alexander , Rachel Grace, Possess Me

Zora Neale Hurston
“Gods always behave like the people who make them.”
Zora Neale Hurston, Tell My Horse: Voodoo and Life in Haiti and Jamaica

Ishmael Reed
“Neo-Hoodoo is the 8 basic dances of 19th century New Orleans' Place Congo- the Calinda the Bamboula the Chacta the Babouille the Conjaille the Juba the Congo and the VooDoo- modernized into the Philly Dog, the Hully Gully, the Funky Chicken, the Popcorn, the Boogaloo and the dance of great American choreographer Buddy Bradley. ”
Ishmael Reed

Venita Louise
“What I feared was the onset of incontinence was simply a mid-laugh crisis.”
Venita Louise, Mixed Nuts

“I straightforward invite you to this worldly connection of god and their function for the procedures of performing magical rites. I ensure you with the best voodoo and love spell which will embody magical powers.”
Ever Smith

Susannah Sandlin
“Morning, ma'am. I'm looking for Tommy Mason. Is he around?" Polite and professional, that was Senior Agent Broussard.
"Lord, what's that no-good sonofabitch done now? Wait, you ain't a cop; you're a game warden. "What'd he do, run over a fish?”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

“The color white is not always what it seems to be. Watch for white handkerchiefs, handmade altars, homemade gumbo, and light summer dresses.”
Martha Ward, Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau
tags: voodoo

Yaa Gyasi
“Since moving to the Castle, she'd discovered that only the white men talked of "black magic." As though magic had a color.”
Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing

Israel Morrow
“In West African traditions, land belongs to the person who works it. Produce belongs to the person who grows it. Whatever is created belongs to the creators—not to the God that created them, and certainly not to the colonist or slavemaster.”
Israel Morrow, Gods of the Flesh: A Skeptic's Journey Through Sex, Politics and Religion

Susannah Sandlin
“What a voice. Deep, throaty, but not in a sexy way. In a haunted way. A voice full of heartbreak and ghosts.

I won't go back, I won't go home,
'Cause in this place, the dead still roam,
'Cause this time, Whiskey Bayou won't let me go.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“There was something about a guy in a uniform most women found irresistible. Ceelie and Sonia had pondered this peculiar phenomenon over late-night glasses of moscato back in Nashville. They'd decided it had to be the belt and all the equipment that dangled from it when the guys walked, which not only was phallic but probably released extra sex pheromones into the air and turned women into nectar-seeking honeybees.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“Ceelie preferred cats and small dogs, although they tended to be eaten by alligators around here, as she recalled. Munchability wasn't a desirable trait in a pet.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“Bones gotta have a special place of respect," she'd told Ceelie more times than she could count. "You treat them right and they'll always speak true."
"The bones never lie," Ceelie whispered, placing the last one - a tiny skull - into the box and closing the lid.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“She glanced up at him. "Why does it matter? Why do you care?"
He'd been staring at her hands again, but jerked his gaze up to hers as if surprised by the question. He answered quickly, almost automatically. "I am a law enforcement officer. I found your aunt and saw what... that animal" -- he seemed to struggle with the words -- "I saw what he did. And we don't know why."
Ceelie nodded. "So this is how you'd treat anyone whose case you got involved with?"...
He leaned across the space that divided them, cupping his left hand around her jaw and pulling her toward him as if she were fragile, breakable. His kiss was soft, a pressure of lips, a slight parting, a promise of more. His stubble scratched her chin.
"That's the real answer." His voice was so soft the air around him seemed to soak it up. "And don't ask me what it means because I'll be damned if I know.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“The lieutenant paused at the low, rhythmic hum sounding from inside the cabin, obviously loud enough for him to hear. Jena moved farther from the door. "What the hell is that?" he asked.
Jena lowered her voice. "It's Ceelie Savoie, chanting or singing or something." She paused, but couldn't resist adding, "She has some new chicken bones."
There was a long pause.
"Chicken bones. Golsalmighty." Warren sighed.”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Susannah Sandlin
“We can do slow and sweet later. I want you fast and rough, and I've been begging for a while now." She hooked a leg around his, bringing their bodies together as close as possible. "If you missed the memo, buddy, I've been trying to get you inside me half the day."
With a low groan, he picked her up and lowered her to the bed, his mouth and tongue setting up a rhythm to match the fingers he slid inside her. "Not that," she said. "You. Now."
"Bossy Cajun woman." He gave her a tousle-haired, lopsided grin as he rolled into the cradle of her thighs, positioning himself at her 'entrance...”
Susannah Sandlin, Wild Man's Curse

Hank Bracker
“No place in Haiti was easy to get to and to drive to their lodge would take a couple of hours, so they sent a van to pick us up. It was already evening and the sun had just set, as we made our way up into the mountains behind Port-au-Prince. As we bounced along the dirt road winding through the hills, I could distinctly hear the rhythm of drums and see fires on the distant mountains. Mrs. Allen, who was with us, explained that in the 1940’s devout members of the Catholic faith considered the Voodoo rites an abomination of their faith. They armed themselves and started to eradicate from Haiti what they considered a cult. The entire thing turned into a war! They burned voodoo temples and shrines, and killed some of the practitioners as well as voodoo priests. In the end, the Catholic hierarchy gave up and after a time reached a tacit understanding with them. They now allowed Voodoo drums and songs to be sung in Catholic Church services and ignored what they once called devil worship.”
Captain Hank Bracker, "Seawater One...."

“Marie the Second sported a bright tignon to signal her status and identity. She flaunted her turban, gold jewelry, and a proud walk that announced to all that saw her -- I am not white, not slave, not black, not French, not Negro, not African American. I am a free woman, a Creole of New Orleans.”
Martha Ward, Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau

Israel Morrow
“In Africa every human has a spark of divine nature, and sin does not separate us from it. We are cousins of God. Every person has multiple souls, including the souls of ancestors that reincarnate through us. The purest soul is called an ori, and a person who cultivates their ori can attain divinity.”
Israel Morrow, Gods of the Flesh: A Skeptic's Journey Through Sex, Politics and Religion

“Funny thing about optimism, if you can become a carrier, it grows more each day and life becomes a little more bearable.”
John Parham, The Binding

Kinky Friedman
“You Struggle with your Demons an you Conquer them.”
Kinky Friedman

Hank Bracker
“No place in Haiti was easy to get to and to drive to their lodge would take a couple of hours, so they sent a van to pick us up. It was already evening and the sun had just set, as we made our way up into the mountains behind Port-au-Prince. As we bounced along the dirt road winding through the hills, I could distinctly hear the rhythm of drums and see fires on the distant mountains. Mrs. Allen, who was with us, explained that in the 1940’s devout members of the Catholic faith considered the Voodoo rites an abomination of their faith. They armed themselves and started to eradicate from Haiti what they considered a cult. The entire thing turned into a war! They burned voodoo temples and shrines, and killed some of the practitioners as well as voodoo priests. In the end, the Catholic hierarchy gave up and after a time reached a tacit understanding with them. They now allowed Voodoo drums and songs to be sung in Catholic Church services and ignored what they once called devil worship.
At the lodge, we were assigned rooms with real beds instead of the cots we were used to on the ship. Dinner consisted of chicken in a hot tomato and garlic sauce, over rice, with a heap of picklese on the side. Picklese is a pickled dish or Vinaigre Piquant, indigenous to Haiti consisting of peppers, shredded cabbage, onions, carrots, peas, vinegar, peppercorns and cloves. The dessert was Haitian Flan. It could not have been better and I was glad that I had availed myself of this generous offer. After dinner we went outside to where there was a large fire roaring, surrounded by benches made of split logs. We were warned that it gets cool in these mountains, and I was glad that I had brought along a sweater and jacket. We seated ourselves on the logs around the fire and listened to a gaunt-looking old Haitian woman explain what Voodoo was. She sounded convincing as she told of the Grand Voodoo Zombie rituals that were held at “Wishing Spot,” and how snakes slithered about the feet of the young women dancers. She spoke reverently about the walking dead in the Lower Artibonite Valley and the Spirits trapped in bottles near Cape Haitian. It was all very spooky and gave me something to think about that night. However before her talk ended, she came directly up to me and, looking deep into my eyes, said that I was to beware…. “I would witness death before leaving the island….” Ouch!”
Captain Hank Bracker, "Seawater One"

“Humble yourself in front of the Lwas for they have given you the opportunity to serve them”
Anujj Elviis

“Blessed are those who get to serve”
Anujj Elviis

Marie Vieux-Chauvet
“Les loas sont les dieux des nègres d’Afrique. Dieu est universel. Les loas se vengent de la désertion des nègres car ils ont été esclaves et persécutés et que le vaudou sera, un jour, leur point de ralliement”
Marie Vieux-Chauvet, Love, Anger, Madness: A Haitian Trilogy

Margot Berwin
“The room was large and empty except for a four-poster bed and a framed picture of Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen of New Orleans.
"A free woman of color who owned her own business," said Vivian Weaver. "She made her own money, and rose to fame and power in a segregated South.”
Margot Berwin, Scent of Darkness

Zora Neale Hurston
“The will to make life beautiful was strong.”
Zora Neale Hurston, Tell My Horse: Voodoo and Life in Haiti and Jamaica

Marie Vieux-Chauvet
“Mais le Père Angelo se refusa tout net à serrer la main au prêtre du vaudou”
Marie Vieux-Chauvet, Love, Anger, Madness: A Haitian Trilogy

« previous 1 3