Performing Quotes

Quotes tagged as "performing" Showing 1-30 of 39
Robert Schumann
“When you play, never mind who listens to you.”
Robert Schumann

Robert Schumann
“Play always as if in the presence of a master.”
Robert Schumann

Robert Schumann
“Endeavour to play easy pieces well and with elegance; that is better than to play difficult pieces badly.”
Robert Schumann, Advice To Young Musicians

Sandhya Menon
“Dimple could see, flush from the endorphins of a great performance, why actors and performers got addicted to this kind of thing. It had always seemed unfathomable to her, choosing a career where all you did was put yourself out in front of hundreds or thousands of people and risked rejection in real time. But if they felt even half of what she was feeling now when it went well...”
Sandhya Menon, When Dimple Met Rishi

David Byrne
“Performers try harder.”
David Byrne, How Music Works

David Byrne
“In musical performances one can sense that the person on stage is having a good time even if they're singing a song about breaking up or being in a bad way. For an actor this would be anathema, it would destroy the illusion, but with singing one can have it both ways. As a singer, you can be transparent and reveal yourself on stage, in that moment, and at the same time be the person whose story is being told in the song. Not too many kinds of performance allow that.”
David Byrne, How Music Works

“Give your soul to touch their hearts.”
Dominique Champault

Stewart Stafford
“It is often asked why the greatest performers are so timid in private. Confident people get attention naturally. Shy people must do something extraordinary or outrageous to have similar recognition.”
Stewart Stafford

“if somebody doesn't have any talent, get off the stage! you're wasting my time.”
Elaine Stritch

Bob Mould
“It reset and mended my freshly damaged and distorted view of life, and made me recognize that this thing we call music, this primal expression that we reshape and refine and define ourselves with, is the gift I was given. The ability to communicate what others feel but cannot fully express, the passing down and around of songs and stories, from Pete Townshend to Joey Ramone to me, to the audiences who take the time and effort to support our work and give us a way to support ourselves -- I'm thinking this is what I am supposed to be doing.”
Bob Mould, See A Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody

David Byrne
“One forgets that part of one's performance is one's history—or sometimes the lack of it. You're playing against what an audience knows, what they expect. This seems to be true of all performers; there's baggage that gets carried into the venue that we can't see.”
David Byrne, How Music Works

Bob Odenkirk
“I told Chris [Farley] and the writers, "Look. Whatever you do, the one thing to remember is: don't start from the ending [of the "van down by the river" sketch]. Start from the beginning, so that you have somewhere to go." Almost every time Chris did that sketch after I left SNL, he started by breaking the table.

I just became one of those dangerous examples of becoming addicted to the big laugh. You become addicted as a performer to that big moment, and you ask yourself, Why am I not just doing my big thing that gets the big reaction? Why am I not just standing up there and doing that?”
Bob Odenkirk

David Byrne
“In the early days, I might have gotten on stage and begun to sing as a desperate attempt to communicate, but now I found that singing was both a physical and emotional joy. It was sensuous, a pure pleasure, which didn't take away from the emotions being expressed—even if they were melancholic. Music can do that; you can enjoy singing about something sad.”
David Byrne, How Music Works

David Byrne
“Powerpoint presentations are a kind of theater, a kind of augmented stand-up. Too often it's a boring and tedious genre, and audiences are subjected to the bad as well as the good.”
David Byrne, How Music Works

“I like performing because it's direct contact with live people. I write a good deal of the time but that's introspective creation rather than interaction.”
Oliver

“There are quite a few people around us performing the job of being our own personal sharpeners. Never a dull moment with them.”
Jeffrey G. Duarte

Jeanette Coron
“Repetition, repetition, repetion; equals Results.”
Jeanette Coron

Peter Carey
“He held back nothing of himself in his effort to please his audience”
Peter Carey, War Crimes

August Wilhelm Schlegel
“But this is not all. Even in a lively oral narration, it is not unusual to introduce persons in conversation with each other, and to give a corresponding variety to the tone and the expression. But the gaps, which these conversations leave in the story, the narrator fills up in his own name with a description of the accompanying circumstances, and other particulars. The dramatic poet must renounce all such expedients; but for this he is richly recompensed in the following invention. He requires each of the characters in his story to be personated by a living individual; that this individual should, in sex, age, and figure, meet as near as may be the prevalent conceptions of his fictitious original, nay, assume his entire personality; that every speech should be delivered in a suitable tone of voice, and accompanied by appropriate action and gesture; and that those external circumstances should be added which are necessary to give the hearers a clear idea of what is going forward. Moreover, these representatives of the creatures of his imagination must appear in the costume belonging to their assumed rank, and to their age and country; partly for the sake of greater resemblance, and partly because, even in dress, there is something characteristic. Lastly, he must see them placed in a locality, which, in some degree, resembles that where, according to his fable, the action took place, because this also contributes to the resemblance: he places them, i.e., on a scene. All this brings us to the
idea of the theatre. It is evident that the very form of dramatic poetry, that is, the exhibition of an action by dialogue without the aid of narrative, implies the theatre as its necessary complement. We allow that there are dramatic works which were not originally designed for the stage, and not calculated to produce any great effect there, which nevertheless afford great pleasure in the perusal. I am, however, very much inclined to doubt whether they would produce the same strong impression, with which they affect us, upon a person who had never seen or heard a description of a theatre. In reading dramatic works, we are accustomed ourselves to supply the representation.”
August Wilhelm Schlegel, Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

Steven Magee
“I first started telling doctors about my abnormal growing toenails in 2014. They did not correctly treat them until 2019, which I found to be very strange and symptomatic of a poor performing healthcare system.”
Steven Magee

Steven Magee
“I have every expectation that the internet will replace much of the expensive and poorly performing healthcare system.”
Steven Magee

Steven Magee
“As a manager in high altitude astronomy, I found poor performing employees to be a feature of remote observatories.”
Steven Magee

Steven Magee
“I had observed similar problems in numerous poor performing high altitude workers I had supervised to the ill health that I displayed at age 48.”
Steven Magee

Angelo Marcos
“This isn’t about killing people for fun. This is about justice. Justice for all the people whose lives end up broken and wasted, because the thing they’ve been looking for all their life doesn’t exist. It doesn’t exist! Even when they get it it’s not real! Doesn’t anyone see?”
Angelo Marcos, The Artist

Steven Magee
“For me, participating in the Pledge of Allegiance is akin to performing a Nazi salute, and that is why I never do it.”
Steven Magee

“I've always got stage fright,' he says. 'There's always a level of fright. If I can just make it manageable rather than overwhelming then I've won.”
Chris Heath, Reveal: Robbie Williams

Steven Magee
“The workers compensation system for occupational diseases is the worst performing government social security department that I have ever encountered.”
Steven Magee

Colum McCann
“The perfection is not so much in the performance as in the journey towards it. This is the joy. You must burn!”
Colum McCann, Dancer

Kate Morton
“Dolly was giddy, infused with life and happiness and the peculiar energy that came from having slipped inside another skin. There was nothing that made her spin quite like it, the invisible moment of transition when she stopped being Dolly Smitham and became instead Someone Else. The details of that Someone Else weren't particularly important; it was the frisson of performance she adored, the sublime pleasure of masquerade. It was like stepping into another person's life. Stealing it for a time.”
Kate Morton, The Secret Keeper

Alan Alda
“I didn't know it, but what I was really looking for was compassion. Not consciously of course. I didn't consciously want to become compassionate. Who in his right mind would give up his place at the center of the universe? Compassion is scary. If you open up too much to people, they have power over you and make you i things for them. Better to keep them at a distance ...
Alan Alda, Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: And Other Things I've Learned

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