Heathcliff Quotes

Quotes tagged as "heathcliff" Showing 1-30 of 46
Emily Brontë
“If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living. You said I killed you--haunt me then. The murdered do haunt their murderers. I believe--I know that ghosts have wandered the earth. Be with me always--take any form--drive me mad. Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! It is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Helen Fielding
“It struck me as pretty ridiculous to be called Mr. Darcy and to stand on your own looking snooty at a party. It's like being called Heathcliff and insisting on spending the entire evening in the garden, shouting "Cathy" and banging your head against a tree.”
Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones's Diary

Deb Caletti
“It starts so young, and I'm angry about that. The garbage we're taught. About love, about what's "romantic." Look at so many of the so-called romantic figures in books and movies. Do we ever stop and think how many of them would cause serious and drastic unhappiness after The End? Why are sick and dangerous personality types so often shown a passionate and tragic and something to be longed for when those are the very ones you should run for your life from? Think about it. Heathcliff. Romeo. Don Juan. Jay Gatsby. Rochester. Mr. Darcy. From the rigid control freak in The Sound of Music to all the bad boys some woman goes running to the airport to catch in the last minute of every romantic comedy. She should let him leave. Your time is so valuable, and look at these guys--depressive and moody and violent and immature and self-centered. And what about the big daddy of them all, Prince Charming? What was his secret life? We dont know anything about him, other then he looks good and comes to the rescue.”
Deb Caletti, The Secret Life of Prince Charming

Emily Brontë
“Nelly, I am Heathcliff - he's always, always in my mind - not as a pleasure, any more then I am always a pleasure to myself - but, as my own being.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“Because misery, and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would have parted us, you, of your own will did it. I have no broken your heart - you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. So much the worse for me that I am strong.”
Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“I have lost the faculty of enjoying their destruction, and I am too idle to destroy for nothing.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“Hush, my darling! Hush, hush, Catherine! I'll stay. If he shot me so, I'd expire with a blessing on my lips.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Marisha Pessl
“...I couldn't let go of the thought that it had, in fact, been he, restless and moody Heathcliff. Day after day, he floated through all the Wal-Marts in America, searching for me in a million lonely aisles.”
Marisha Pessl, Special Topics in Calamity Physics

Jasper Fforde
“I was on HPD--Heathcliff Protection Duty--in Wuthering Heights for two years, and believe me, the ProCaths tried everything. I personally saved him from assassination eight times.”
Jasper Fforde, Lost in a Good Book

Jasper Fforde
“Who do readers expect to see when they pick up this book? Who has won the Most Troubled Romantic Lead at the BookWorld Awards seventy-seven times in a row? Me. All me.”
Jasper Fforde, The Well of Lost Plots

Emily Brontë
“Wish and learn to smooth away the surly wrinkles, to raise your lids frankly, and change the fiends to confident, innocent angels, suspecting and doubting nothing, and always seeing friends where they are not sure of foes.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“It is astonishing how sociable I feel myself compared with him.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“I got the sexton, who was digging Linton’s grave, to remove the earth off her coffin lid, and I opened it. I thought, once, I would have stayed there, when I saw her face again—it is hers yet—he had hard work to stir me; but he said it would change, if the air blew on it...”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Jasper Fforde
“I also read about Heathcliff's unexpected three-year career in Hollywood under the name Buck Stallion and his eventual return to the pages of Wuthering Heights.”
Jasper Fforde, Lost in a Good Book

Emily Brontë
“He might as well plant an oak in a flower-pot and expect it to thrive, as imagine he can restore her to vigour in the soil of his shallow cares?”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“I love my murderer--but yours? How can I?”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Charlotte Brontë
“Heathcliff, if I were you, I’d go stretch myself over her grave and die like a faithful dog. The world is surely not worth living in now, is it? You had distinctly impressed on me the idea that Catherine was the whole joy of your life: I can’t imagine how you think of surviving her loss.”
Charlotte Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“Are you possessed with a devil,' he pursued, savagely, 'to talk in that manner to me when you are dying? Do you reflect that all those words will be branded in my memory, and eating deeper eternally after you have left me?”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

“And Heathcliff? What an evil fellow. Or is he merely misunderstood?”
Mary O'Connell, Dear Reader

Charlotte Brontë
“Far rather would I be condemned to a perpetual dwelling in the infernal regions, than, even for one night, abide beneath the roof of Wuthering Heights again.”
Charlotte Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“invariably to me, I know, and to any person who saw her, I should think--refuted more tangible proofs of convalescence, and stamped her as one doomed to decay.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“That is not my Heathcliff. I shall love mine yet; and take him with me: he’s in my soul.”
Emily Brontë

Emily Brontë
“and firstly, let me beware of the fascination that lurks in Catherine Heathcliff's brilliant eyes. I should be in a curious taking if I surrendered my heart to that young person, and the daughter turned out a second edition of the mother.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Deanna Raybourn
“Brisbane, if you wish to go about looking like Heathcliff that is your affair.”
Deanna Raybourn, Silent on the Moor

Emily Brontë
“He was leaning against the ledge of an open lattice, but not looking out: his face was turned to the interior gloom. The fire had smouldered to ashes; the room was filled with the damp, mild air of the cloudy evening; and so still, that not only the murmur of the beck down Gimmerton was distinguishable, but its ripples and its gurgling over the pebbles, or through the large stones which it could not cover. I uttered an ejaculation of discontent at seeing the dismal grate, and commenced shutting the casements, one after another, till I came to his.

'Must I close this?' I asked, in order to rouse him; for he would not stir.
The light flashed on his features as I spoke. Oh, Mr. Lockwood, I cannot express what a terrible start I got by the momentary view! Those deep black eyes! That smile, and ghastly paleness! It appeared to me, not Mr. Heathcliff, but a goblin; and, in my terror, I let the candle bend towards the wall, and it left me in darkness.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“Yes you had the reason of going to bed with a proud heart and an empty stomach,' said I. 'Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“That brute of a lad has warmed me nicely. Next time, Master Edgar, take the law into your own fists it will give you an appetite!”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë
“No, God won't have the satisfaction that I shall,' he returned. 'I only wish I knew the best way! Let me alone, and I'll plan it out: while I'm thinking of that, I don't feel pain.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

“The wider moral argument in this text coheres closely with attitudes in the Wilberforce circle towards human nature in the context of slavery.”
christoper heywood

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